Search results for 'Biomedical Research' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  8
    Julian Reiss (2010). In Favour of a Millian Proposal to Reform Biomedical Research. Synthese 177 (3):427 - 447.
    One way to make philosophy of science more socially relevant is to attend to specific scientific practises that affect society to a great extent. One such practise is biomedical research. This paper looks at contemporary U.S. biomedical research in particular and argues that it suffers from important epistemic, moral and socioeconomic failings. It then discusses and criticises existing approaches to improve on the status quo, most prominently by Thomas Pogge (a political philosopher), Joseph Stiglitz (a Nobel-prize (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  2.  16
    Thomas H. Murray & Josephine Johnston (eds.) (2010). Trust and Integrity in Biomedical Research: The Case of Financial Conflicts of Interest. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    This volume assesses the ethical, quantitative, and qualitative questions posed by the current financing of biomedical research.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  3.  23
    David B. Resnik (2003). Exploitation in Biomedical Research. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (3):233--259.
    This essay analyzesexploitation in biomedical research in terms ofthree basic elements: harm, disrespect, orinjustice. There are also degrees ofexploitation, ranging from highly exploitationto minimally exploitation. Althoughexploitation is prima facie wrongful,some exploitative research studies are morallyjustified, all things considered. The reasonan exploitative study can still be ethical isthat other moral considerations, such as theautonomy of the research subject or the socialbenefits of research, may sometimes justifystudies that are minimally exploitative. Calling a research project exploitative doesnot (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  4.  2
    Jean-Paul Gaudillière (2006). Normal Pathways: Controlling Isotopes and Building Biomedical Research in Postwar France. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 39 (4):737 - 764.
    During the late 1940s and 1950s, radioisotopes became important resources for biological and medical research. This article explores the strategies used by French researchers to get access to this material, either from the local Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) or from suppliers in the United States or United Kingdom. It focuses on two aspects of this process: the transatlantic circulation of both isotopes and associated instrumentation; the regulation of use and access by the administrative bodies governing research in France. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  5.  25
    Malhar N. Kumar (2008). A Review of the Types of Scientific Misconduct in Biomedical Research. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 6 (3):211-228.
    Biomedical research has increased in magnitude over the last two decades. Increasing number of researchers has led to increase in competition for scarce resources. Researchers have often tried to take the shortest route to success which may involve performing fraudulent research. Science suffers from unethical research as much time, effort and cost is involved in exposing fraud and setting the standards right. It is better for all students of science to be aware of the methods used (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  6.  2
    Nikolas Stroth (forthcoming). The Central Importance of Laboratories for Reducing Waste in Biomedical Research. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-10.
    The global biomedical research enterprise is driving substantial advances in medicine and healthcare. Yet it appears that the enterprise is rather wasteful, falling short of its true innovative potential. Suggested reasons are manifold and involve various stakeholders, such that there is no single remedy. In the present paper, I will argue that laboratories are the basic working units of the biomedical research enterprise and an important site of action for corrective intervention. Keeping laboratories relatively small will (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  29
    Kiarash Aramesh (2015). A Brief History of Biomedical Research Ethics in Iran: Conflict of Paradigms. Developing World Bioethics 15 (2):107-112.
    During the past two decades, Iran has experienced a noteworthy growth in its biomedical research sector. At the same time, ethical concerns and debates resulting from this burgeoning enterprise has led to increasing attention paid to biomedical ethics. In Iran, Biomedical research ethics and research oversight passed through major periods during the past decades, separated by a paradigm shift. Period 1, starting from the early 1970s, is characterized by research paternalism and complete reliance (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  16
    Daniel Steiner (1996). Competing Interests: The Need to Control Conflict of Interests in Biomedical Research. Science and Engineering Ethics 2 (4):457-468.
    Individual and institutional conflict of interests in biomedical research have becomes matters of increasing concern in recent years. In the United States, the growth in relationships — sponsored research agreements, consultancies, memberships on boards, licensing agreements, and equity ownership — between for-profit corporations and research universities and their scientists has made the problem of conflicts, particularly financial conflicts, more acute. Conflicts can interfere with or compromise important principles and obligations of researchers and their institutions, e.g., adherence (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  9.  12
    Emma Keuleyan (2010). Liberty to Decide on Dual Use Biomedical Research: An Acknowledged Necessity. Science and Engineering Ethics 16 (1):43-58.
    Humanity entered the twenty-first century with revolutionary achievements in biomedical research. At the same time multiple “dual-use” results have been published. The battle against infectious diseases is meeting new challenges, with newly emerging and re-emerging infections. Both natural disaster epidemics, such as SARS, avian influenza, haemorrhagic fevers, XDR and MDR tuberculosis and many others, and the possibility of intentional mis-use, such as letters containing anthrax spores in USA, 2001, have raised awareness of the real threats. Many great men, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  10.  3
    L. McHenry (2008). Biomedical Research and Corporate Interests: A Question of Academic Freedom. Mens Sana Monographs 6 (1):146.
    _The current situation in medicine has been described as a crisis of credibility, as the profit motive of industry has taken control of clinical trials and the dissemination of data. Pharmaceutical companies maintain a stranglehold over the content of medical journals in three ways: (1) by ghostwriting articles that bias the results of clinical trials, (2) by the sheer economic power they exert on journals due to the purchase of drug advertisements and journal reprints, and (3) by the threat of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  11.  7
    David B. Resnick (1999). Privatized Biomedical Research, Public Fears, and the Hazards of Government Regulation: Lessons From Stem Cell Research. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 7 (3):273-287.
    This paper discusses the hazards of regulating controversial biomedical research in light of the emergence of powerful, multi-national biotechnology corporations. Prohibitions on the use of government funds can simply force controversial research into the private sphere, and unilateral or multilateral research bans can simply encourage multi-national companies to conduct research in countries that lack restrictive laws. Thus, a net effect of government regulation is that research migrates from the public to the private sphere. Because (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  12.  16
    Robert C. Jones & Ray Greek (2014). A Review of the Institute of Medicine's Analysis of Using Chimpanzees in Biomedical Research. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (2):481-504.
    We argue that the recommendations made by the Institute of Medicine’s 2011 report, Chimpanzees in Biomedical and Behavioral Research : Assessing the Necessity, are methodologically and ethically confused. We argue that a proper understanding of evolution and complexity theory in terms of the science and ethics of using chimpanzees in biomedical research would have had led the committee to recommend not merely limiting but eliminating the use of chimpanzees in biomedical research. Specifically, we argue (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  2
    Pēteris Zilgalvis (2002). The Council of Europe's Instruments on Biomedical Research: How is Conflict of Interest Addressed? [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):277-281.
    Conflict of interest is an issue that has been put in the spotlight by the commercial application of the new biomedical technologies. This paper presents the approach of the Council of Europe and the binding legal instruments to deal with this problem. The main focus is on the Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine, and its draft additional Protocol on Biomedical Research.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  14.  7
    M. B. Weyden (2007). The ICMJE and URM: Providing Independent Advice for the Conduct of Biomedical Research and Publication. Mens Sana Monographs 5 (1):15.
    _The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) is a working group of editors of selected medical journals that meets annually. Founded in Vancouver, Canada, in 1978, it currently consists of 11 member journals and a representative of the US National Library of Medicine. The major purpose of the Committee is to address and provide guidance for the conduct and publishing of biomedical research and the ethical tenets underpinning these activities. This advice is detailed in the Committee's _ (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  6
    Judge Christian Byk (2002). Conflicts of Interests and Access to Information Resulting From Biomedical Research: An International Legal Perspective. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):287-290.
    Recently adopted international texts have given a new focus on conflicts of interests and access to information resulting from biomedical research. They confirmed ethical review committees as a central point to guarantee individual rights and the effective application of ethical principles. Therefore specific attention should be paid in giving such committees all the facilities necessary to keep them independent and qualified.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  23
    Christopher Tollefsen (2008). Biomedical Research and Beyond: Expanding the Ethics of Inquiry. Routledge.
    Biomedical Research and Beyond: Expanding the Ethics of Inquiry investigates the ethics of biomedical and scientific inquiry, including embryonic research, animal research, genetic enhancement, and fairness in research in the developing world. Core concerns of biomedical and scientific research ethics are then shown also to be key in humanistic areas of inquiry. Biomedical Research and Beyond concludes with a discussion of the virtues that all inquirers, scientific, medical, and humanistic, should (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  4
    Stephen A. Gallo, Michael Lemaster & Scott R. Glisson (2016). Frequency and Type of Conflicts of Interest in the Peer Review of Basic Biomedical Research Funding Applications: Self-Reporting Versus Manual Detection. Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (1):189-197.
    Despite the presumed frequency of conflicts of interest in scientific peer review, there is a paucity of data in the literature reporting on the frequency and type of conflicts that occur, particularly with regard to the peer review of basic science applications. To address this gap, the American Institute of Biological Sciences conducted a retrospective analysis of conflict of interest data from the peer review of 282 biomedical research applications via several onsite review panels. The overall conflicted-ness of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  1
    Sir David Weatherall (2003). Problems for Biomedical Research at the Academia-Industrial Interface. Science and Engineering Ethics 9 (1):43-48.
    Throughout much of the world, universities have driven towards industrial partnerships. This collaboration, which, in the biochemical field at least, has to continue if potential benefits for patients are to be realised, has brought with it a number of problems. These include the neglect of long-term research in favour of short-term projects, the curtailing of free dissemination of research information within university departments and the biasing of results of clinical trials by the financial interests of the investigators.It is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  45
    James V. Lavery (ed.) (2007). Ethical Issues in International Biomedical Research: A Casebook. Oxford University Press.
    No other volume has this scope. Students in bioethics, public and international health, and ethics will find this book particularly useful.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  20.  2
    Antonio Casado da Rocha & José Antonio Seoane (2008). Alternative Consent Models for Biobanks: The New Spanish Law on Biomedical Research. Bioethics 22 (8):440-447.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  21.  6
    Dannie di Tillio-gonzalez & Ruth L. Fischbach (2008). Harmonizing Regulations for Biomedical Research: A Critical Analysis of the Us and Venezuelan Systems. Developing World Bioethics 8 (3):167-177.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  22.  12
    Pēteris Zilgalvis (2004). Placebo Use in Council of Europe Biomedical Research Instruments. Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (1):15-22.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  23.  55
    Baruch A. Brody (1998). The Ethics of Biomedical Research: An International Perspective. Oxford University Press.
    A broad critical review of national policies on biomedical research - human, epidemiologic, clinical trials, genetic, reproductive, etc.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   18 citations  
  24.  1
    Sylvie Vandoolaeghe, Alessandra Blaizot, Danie Boudiguet, Valérie Bougault, Eduardo Dei Cas, Benoît Foligne, Anne Goffard, Hélène Lefranc, Bénédicte Oxombre, Thomas Trentesaux, Bernard Vandenbunder, Isabelle Wolowczuk, Laurence Delhaes & The “Ethic and Research” Working Group (2015). A Charter for Biomedical Research Ethics in a Progressive, Caring Society. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 10 (1):1-6.
    BackgroundGiven that advances in research continuously raise new ethical issues, a multidisciplinary working group of investigators involved in biomedical research has gathered to discuss and compare ethical viewpoints in their daily practice.MethodsThe working group has drafted a Charter for Ethics in Biomedical Research that encompasses all the steps in the research process, i.e. from the initial idea to analysis and publication of the results.ResultsBased on key principles for ethically responsible research, the Charter may (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  8
    Susan Eastwood, Pamela Derish, Evangeline Leash & Stephen Ordway (1996). Ethical Issues in Biomedical Research: Perceptions and Practices of Postdoctoral Research Fellows Responding to a Survey. Science and Engineering Ethics 2 (1):89-114.
    We surveyed 1005 postdoctoral fellows by questionnaire about ethical matters related to biomedical research and publishing; 33% responded. About 18% of respondents said they had taken a course in research ethics, and about 31% said they had had a course that devoted some time to research ethics. A substantial majority stated willingness to grant other investigators, except competitors, access to their data before publication and to share research materials. Respondents’ opinions about contributions justifying authorship of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   16 citations  
  26.  7
    David B. Resnik (2012). Limits on Risks for Healthy Volunteers in Biomedical Research. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (2):137-149.
    Healthy volunteers in biomedical research often face significant risks in studies that offer them no medical benefits. The U.S. federal research regulations and laws adopted by other countries place no limits on the risks that these participants face. In this essay, I argue that there should be some limits on the risks for biomedical research involving healthy volunteers. Limits on risk are necessary to protect human participants, institutions, and the scientific community from harm. With the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  27.  16
    R. R. Kishore (2006). Biomedical Research and Mining of the Poor: The Need for Their Exclusion. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (1):175-183.
    Almost all ethical guidelines and legislative policies concerning biomedical research involving human subjects contain provisions about relevance of research for the participating populations, informed consent, adequate care for research induced injuries and several other safeguards but the poor continue to suffer. Globalization has further aggravated poor people’s vulnerability by exposing them to international markets. Since the developing countries are abode of higher population of the poor they have become the unholy mines of this human ore for (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  28.  1
    Paulina Tindana, Catherine S. Molyneux, Susan Bull & Michael Parker (2014). Ethical Issues in the Export, Storage and Reuse of Human Biological Samples in Biomedical Research: Perspectives of Key Stakeholders in Ghana and Kenya. BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):76.
    For many decades, access to human biological samples, such as cells, tissues, organs, blood, and sub-cellular materials such as DNA, for use in biomedical research, has been central in understanding the nature and transmission of diseases across the globe. However, the limitations of current ethical and regulatory frameworks in sub-Saharan Africa to govern the collection, export, storage and reuse of these samples have resulted in inconsistencies in practice and a number of ethical concerns for sample donors, researchers and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Francis Kombe (2015). Enhancing Quality and Integrity in Biomedical Research in Africa: An International Call for Greater Focus, Investment and Standardisation in Capacity Strengthening for Frontline Staff. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-5.
    The integrity of biomedical research depends heavily on the quality of research data collected. In turn, data quality depends on processes of data collection, a task undertaken by frontline research staff in many research programmes in Africa and elsewhere. These frontline research staff often have additional responsibilities including translating and communicating research in local languages, seeking informed consent for study participation and maintaining supportive relationships between research institutions and study participants and wider (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Alexander Rushforth & Sarah de Rijcke (2015). Accounting for Impact? The Journal Impact Factor and the Making of Biomedical Research in the Netherlands. Minerva 53 (2):117-139.
    The range and types of performance metrics has recently proliferated in academic settings, with bibliometric indicators being particularly visible examples. One field that has traditionally been hospitable towards such indicators is biomedicine. Here the relative merits of bibliometrics are widely discussed, with debates often portraying them as heroes or villains. Despite a plethora of controversies, one of the most widely used indicators in this field is said to be the Journal Impact Factor. In this article we argue that much of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  9
    Merryn Ekberg (2012). Reassessing the Role of the Biomedical Research Ethics Committee. Journal of Academic Ethics 10 (4):335-352.
    The role of the Research Ethics Committee (REC) in the design, conduct and dissemination of scientific research is still evolving and many important questions remain unanswered. Hence, the aim of this paper is to address some of the uncertainty that exists around the role and responsibilities of RECs and to discuss some of the controversy that exists over the criteria that RECs should follow when evaluating a research proposal. The discussion is organised around five of the major (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  32.  12
    Catherine M. Klein (2007). Creation and Use of Transgenic Animals in Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Research. Journal of Philosophical Research 32 (Supplement):7-26.
    The creation of transgenic animals has application in the following areas of pharmaceutical and biomedical research: the production of biopharmaceuticals for human use; the production of organs for xenotransplantation; and the generation of animal models for human genetic diseases. Nuclear transfer technology offers a more precise and efficient way of performing genetic modification and creating transgenic animals than the more traditional method of pronuclear microinjection. This paper will review nuclear transfer as ameans of producing transgenic animals; introduce advantages (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Angeliki Kerasidou & Michael Parker (2014). Does Science Need Bioethicists? Ethics and Science Collaboration in Biomedical Research. Research Ethics 10 (4):214-226.
    Biomedical research is an increasingly multidisciplinary activity bringing together a range of different academic fields and forms of expertise to investigate diseases that are increasingly understood to be complex and multifactorial. Recently the discipline of ethics has been starting to find a place in large-scale biomedical collaborations. In this article we draw from our experience of working with the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network and other research projects to reflect upon the integration of ethics into biomedical (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  10
    Charles Weijer & E. J. Emanuel, Protecting Communities in Biomedical Research.
    Although for the last 50 years, ethicists dealing with human experimentation have focused primarily on the need to protect individual research subjects and vulnerable groups, biomedical research, especially in genetics, now requires the establishment of standards for the protection of communities. We have developed such a strategy, based on five steps. (i) Identification of community characteristics relevant to the biomedical research setting, (ii) delineation of a typology of different types of communities using these characteristics, (iii) (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   17 citations  
  35. William M. Sage (2010). Some Principles Require Principals : Why Banning 'Conflicts of Interest' Won't Solve Incentive Problems in Biomedical Research. In Thomas H. Murray & Josephine Johnston (eds.), Trust and Integrity in Biomedical Research: The Case of Financial Conflicts of Interest. Johns Hopkins University Press
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  36.  64
    Annette Rid & David Wendler (2011). A Framework for Risk-Benefit Evaluations in Biomedical Research. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 21 (2):141-179.
    One of the key ethical requirements for biomedical research is that it have an acceptable risk-benefit profile (Emanuel, Wendler, and Grady 2000). The International Conference of Harmonization guidelines mandate that clinical trials should be initiated and continued only if “the anticipated benefits justify the risks” (1996). Guidelines from the Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences state that biomedical research is acceptable only if the “potential benefits and risks are reasonably balanced” (2002). U.S. federal regulations require (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  37.  4
    Dorothy E. Roberts (2006). Legal Constraints on the Use of Race in Biomedical Research: Toward a Social Justice Framework. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 34 (3):526-534.
    This article addresses three questions concerning the legal regulation of the use of race as a category in biomedical research: how does the law currently encourage the use of race in biomedical research?; how might the existing legal framework constrain its use?; and what should be the law's approach to race-based biomedical research? It proposes a social justice approach that aims to promote racial equality by discouraging the use of “race” as a biological category (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  38.  14
    David B. Resnik (2004). The Distribution of Biomedical Research Resources and International Justice. Developing World Bioethics 4 (1):42–57.
    ABSTRACTAccording to some estimates, less than 10% of the world's biomedical research funds are dedicated to addressing problems that are responsible for 90% of the world's burden of disease. This paper explains why this disparity exists and what should be done about it. It argues that the disparity exists because: 1) multinational pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies do not regard research and development investments on the health problems of developing nations to be economically lucrative; and 2) governmental agencies (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  39.  19
    Julian Reiss & Philip Kitcher (2010). Biomedical Research, Neglected Diseases, and Well-Ordered Science. Theoria. An International Journal for Theory, History and Foundations of Science 24 (3):263-282.
    In this paper we make a proposal for reforming biomedical research that is aimed to align re-search more closely with the so-called fair-share principle according to which the proportions of global resources as-signed to different diseases should agree with the ratios of human suffering associated with those diseases.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  40.  66
    R. Macklin (2010). Intertwining Biomedical Research and Public Health in HIV Microbicide Research. Public Health Ethics 3 (3):199-209.
    Finding an effective microbicide that could substantially lower women’s risk of acquiring HIV infection is an ethical imperative. Women and girls continue to be disproportionally affected by HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. Ethics guidelines for conducting preventive HIV microbicide trials call for steps that intertwine biomedical research and public health. Ethical considerations include adequate studies of the safety of microbicides, the use of placebo controls in future trials once a microbicide is shown to be effective, whether leftover microbicide from (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  41.  4
    Nicolas Rasmussen (2002). Of `Small Men', Big Science and Bigger Business: The Second World War and Biomedical Research in the United States. [REVIEW] Minerva 40 (2):115-146.
    The Second World War is commonly said to have ushered in theera of `big science' in the United States. However, at least inpractically-oriented biomedical research, the American governmentadopted modes of sponsorship that were commonplace between scientistsand industry before the war. Furthermore, many life scientistsleading wartime projects were already familiar with industrialcollaboration. This essay argues that the new federal regimes introduced in the late 1940s and 1950s were more important than wartime experience in shaping the character of biomedical (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  42.  6
    C. Trouet (2004). New European Guidelines for the Use of Stored Human Biological Materials in Biomedical Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (1):99-103.
    The increasing possibilities for using tissue for research and development in genetics and biotechnology have made stored human biological materials more important than ever. Using stored human biological materials raises many legal and ethical questions. On an international level however, the use of these materials has not been regulated in a detailed manner so far. The Council of Europe recently declassified the text of the proposal for an instrument on the use of archived human biological materials in biomedical (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  43.  6
    S. Shapshay & K. D. Pimple (2007). Participation in Biomedical Research is an Imperfect Moral Duty: A Response to John Harris. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (7):414-417.
    In his paper “Scientific research is a moral duty”, John Harris argues that individuals have a moral duty to participate in biomedical research by volunteering as research subjects. He supports his claim with reference to what he calls the principle of beneficence as embodied in the “rule of rescue” , and the principle of fairness embodied in the prohibition on “free riding” . His view that biomedical research is an important social good is agreed (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  44.  45
    Inmaculada de Melo-Martín & Kristen Intemann (2011). Feminist Resources for Biomedical Research: Lessons From the HPV Vaccines. Hypatia 26 (1):79-101.
    Several feminist philosophers of science have argued that social and political values are compatible with, and may even enhance, scientific objectivity. A variety of normative recommendations have emerged regarding how to identify, manage, and critically evaluate social values in science. In particular, several feminist theorists have argued that scientific communities ought to: 1) include researchers with diverse experiences, interests, and values, with equal opportunity and authority to scrutinize research; 2) investigate or “study up” scientific phenomena from the perspectives, interests, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  45.  27
    Gary L. Francione (2007). The Use of Nonhuman Animals in Biomedical Research: Necessity and Justification. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 35 (2):241-248.
    Discourse about the use of animals in biomedical research usually focuses on two issues: its empirical and moral use. The empirical issue asks whether the use of nonhumans in experiments is required in order to get data. The moral issue asks whether the use of nonhumans can be defended as matter of ethical theory. Although the use of animals in research may involve a plausible necessity claim, no moral justification exists for using nonhumans in situations in which (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  46.  10
    Pauline E. Osamor & Nancy Kass (2012). Decision-Making and Motivation to Participate in Biomedical Research in Southwest Nigeria. Developing World Bioethics 12 (2):87-95.
    Motivations and decision-making styles that influence participation in biomedical research vary across study types, cultures, and countries. While there is a small amount of literature on informed consent in non-western cultures, few studies have examined how participants make the decision to join research. This study was designed to identify the factors motivating people to participate in biomedical research in a traditional Nigerian community, assess the degree to which participants involve others in the decision-making process, and (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  47.  12
    Richard R. Sharp & Morris W. Foster (2007). Grappling with Groups: Protecting Collective Interests in Biomedical Research. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (4):321 – 337.
    Strategies for protecting historically disadvantaged groups have been extensively debated in the context of genetic variation research, making this a useful starting point in examining the protection of social groups from harm resulting from biomedical research. We analyze research practices developed in response to concerns about the involvement of indigenous communities in studies of genetic variation and consider their potential application in other contexts. We highlight several conceptual ambiguities and practical challenges associated with the protection of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  48.  9
    Christiane Auray-Blais & Johane Patenaude (2006). A Biobank Management Model Applicable to Biomedical Research. BMC Medical Ethics 7 (1):1-9.
    Background The work of Research Ethics Boards (REBs), especially when involving genetics research and biobanks, has become more challenging with the growth of biotechnology and biomedical research. Some REBs have even rejected research projects where the use of a biobank with coded samples was an integral part of the study, the greatest fear being the lack of participant protection and uncontrolled use of biological samples or related genetic data. The risks of discrimination and stigmatization are (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  49.  2
    John Hadley (2011). Telling It Like It Is: A Proposal to Improve Transparency in Biomedical Research. Between the Species 15 (1):7.
    Recent proposals to improve public communication about animal-based biomedical research have been narrowly focused on reforming biomedical journal submission guidelines. My suggestion for communication reform is broader in scope reaching beyond the research community to healthcare communicators and ultimately the general public. The suggestion is for researchers to provide journalists and public relations practitioners with concise summaries of their ‘animal use data’. Animal use data is collected by researchers and intended for the public record but is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  50.  9
    E. Lamas, M. Ferrer, A. Molina, R. Salinas, A. Hevia, A. Bota, D. Feinholz, M. Fuchs, R. Schramm, J. -C. Tealdi & S. Zorrilla (2010). A Comparative Analysis of Biomedical Research Ethics Regulation Systems in Europe and Latin America with Regard to the Protection of Human Subjects. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (12):750-753.
    The European project European and Latin American Systems of Ethics Regulation of Biomedical Research Project (EULABOR) has carried out the first comparative analysis of ethics regulation systems for biomedical research in seven countries in Europe and Latin America, evaluating their roles in the protection of human subjects. We developed a conceptual and methodological framework defining ‘ethics regulation system for biomedical research’ as a set of actors, institutions, codes and laws involved in overseeing the ethics (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000