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  1. Birgitta Dresp & Keith Langley (2009). The Biological Significance of Color. In D. Skusevich & P. Matikas (eds.), Color Perception: Physiology, Processes and Analysis. Nova Science Publishers. 110--115.
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  2. Birgitta Dresp & Jean Charles Barthaud (2006). Has the Brain Evolved to Answer “Binding Questions” or to Generate Likely Hypotheses About Complex and Continuously Changing Environments? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (1):75-76.
    We question the ecological plausibility as a general model of cognition of van der Velde's & de Kamps's combinatorial blackboard architecture, where knowledge-binding in space and time relies on the structural rules of language. Evidence against their view of the brain and an ecologically plausible, alternative model of cognition are brought forward.
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  3. Birgitta Dresp (2003). Double, Double, Toil and Trouble – Fire Burn, and Theory Bubble! Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (4):409-410.
    Lehar's Gestalt Bubble model introduces a computational approach to holistic aspects of three-dimensional scene perception. The model as such has merit because it manages to translate certain Gestalt principles of perceptual organization into formal codes or algorithms. The mistake made in this target article is to present the model within the theoretical framework of the question of consciousness. As a scientific approach to the problem of consciousness, the Gestalt Bubble fails for several reasons. This commentary addresses three of these: (1) (...)
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  4. Birgitta Dresp (2001). External Regularities and Adaptive Signal Exchanges in the Brain. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (4):663-664.
    Shepard's concept of internalization does not suggest mechanisms which help to understand how the brain adapts to changes, how representations of a steadily changing environment are updated or, in short, how brain learning continues throughout life. Neural mechanisms, as suggested by Barlow, may prove a more powerful alternative. Brain theories such as Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) propose mechanisms to explain how representational activities may be linked in space and time. Some predictions of ART are confirmed by psychophysical and neurophysiological data. (...)
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  5. Birgitta Dresp (1999). The Cognitive Impenetrability Hypothesis: Doomsday for the Unity of the Cognitive Neurosciences? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):375-376.
    The heuristic value of Pylyshyn's cognitive impenetrability theory is questioned in this commentary, mainly because, as it stands, the key argument cannot be challenged empirically. Pylyshyn requires unambiguous evidence for an effect of cognitive states on early perceptual mechanisms, which is impossible to provide because we can only infer what might happen at these earlier levels of processing on the basis of evidence collected at the post-perceptual stage. Furthermore, the theory that early visual processes cannot be modified by cognitive states (...)
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  6. Birgitta Dresp (1998). Area, Surface, and Contour: Psychophysical Correlates of Three Classes of Pictorial Completion. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (6):755-756.
    A simple working taxonomy with three classes of pictorial completion is proposed as an alternative to Pessoa et al.'s classification: area, surface, and contour completion. The classification is based on psychophysical evidence, not on the different phenomenal attributes of the stimuli, showing that pictorial completion is likely to involve mechanistic interactions in the visual system at different levels of processing. Whether the concept of “filling-in” is an appropriate metaphor for the visual mechanisms that may underlie perceptual completion is questioned.
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  7. Birgitta Dresp (1993). The Kanizsa Square Does Not Engender a Configural Superiority Effect. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 31 (3):183-184.
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