Search results for 'Blair McDonald' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Blair McDonald (2009). Friendship's Future: Derrida's Promising Thought. Derrida Today 2 (2):210-221.score: 240.0
    This paper will address the political and ethical ramifications of Derrida's concern for friendship in relation to his concerns with the future of democracy, rights of hospitality and cosmopolitics. The questions addressed read as follows: Is there a way we can get beyond this stance which not only consolidates a friendship of the ‘perhaps’ with a friendship of the promise, but also implicates their consolidation with the very future of what we today call democracy? Is there a way in which (...)
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  2. R. Thomas McDonald (1992). McDonald, From Page One. Inquiry 10 (4):18-22.score: 180.0
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  3. David Blair (2012). Science Works Better Than That. Australian Humanist, The 108 (108):12.score: 60.0
    Blair, David David Tribe, in his article, 'On science, good, bad and ugly' (AH, No. 107, Spring 2012), criticises an earlier article by Victor Bien. Bien - rightly in my view - defends present-day science in respect of three areas where science is under attack; the most prominent of these three is anthropogenic global warming (AGW). Tribe claims that, Victor Bien appears to have inflated views on the sagacity, objectivity and probity of scientists, who can be called our new (...)
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  4. Greg Dickinson, Carole Blair & Brian L. Ott (eds.) (2010). Places of Public Memory: The Rhetoric of Museums and Memorials. University of Alabama Press.score: 60.0
    introduction Rhetoric/Memory/Place Carole Blair, Greg Dickinson, and Brian L. Ott The story is told of the poet Simonides of Ceos who, after chanting a poem ...
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  5. R. J. R. Blair (1997). Affect and the Moral‐Conventional Distinction. Journal of Moral Education 26 (2):187-196.score: 60.0
    Abstract The effect of inducing negative, positive or neutral affect on the recall of moral and conventional transgressions and positive moral and conventional acts was examined. It was found that inducing negative affect was associated with higher recall of moral transgressions while inducing positive affect was associated with higher recall of positive moral acts. Affect induction condition did not have a significant effect on the recall of the conventional transgressions or positive acts. The results are interpreted within the Violence Inhibition (...)
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  6. David Blair (2013). Review Essay, Part II [Book Review]. Australian Humanist, The 109 (109):23.score: 60.0
    Blair, David Review(s) of: Incognito: The secret lives of the brain, by David Eagleman, Text Publishing, Melbourne, 2011, paperback, $35.
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  7. David Blair (2012). Review Essay, Part I [Book Review]. Australian Humanist, The 108 (108):23.score: 60.0
    Blair, David Review(s) of: Incognito: The secret lives of the brain, by David Eagleman, Text Publishing, Melbourne, 2011, paperback, $35.
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  8. James I. H. McDonald (1998). The Crucible of Christian Morality. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Christian morality has been of enormous significance in world history and still underpins moral notions today. In this groundbreaking volume, J. Ian H. McDonald explores the notion of Christian ethics and discusses its roots, its significance in developing moral standards throughout the world and its stability in the modern world. The Crucible of Christian Morality begins with a study of the ethos of early Christian communities, examining the relation of cosmic vision to moral attitude and authority, noting also the (...)
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  9. David Blair (2013). Real Science. Australian Humanist, The 110 (110):16.score: 60.0
    Blair, David Concerning David Tribe's rejoinder (AH, Autumn 2013) to my 'Science works better than that' (AH, Summer 2012), it's pleasing to see that there are some points on which we agree. Unfortunately he continues to make a strong and unjustified attack on the scientific community as a whole-essentially on the grounds that, of the conclusions of science that later turned out to be false, virtually all of them were at some time 'believed' by most scientists. In reply, I (...)
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  10. David Blair (2013). Here on Earth: An Argument for Hope [Book Review]. Australian Humanist, The 110 (110):23.score: 60.0
    Blair, David Review(s) of: Here on earth: An argument for hope, by Tim Flannery, Text Publishing Co. 2010 $35 (smaller print $25).
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  11. Steven M. Emmanuel, Jon Stewart & William McDonald (eds.) (2014). Volume 15, Tome III: Kierkegaard's Concepts: Envy to Incognito. Ashgate.score: 60.0
    Kierkegaard’s Concepts is a comprehensive, multi-volume survey of the key concepts and categories that inform Kierkegaard’s writings. Each article is a substantial, original piece of scholarship, which discusses the etymology and lexical meaning of the relevant Danish term, traces the development of the concept over the course of the authorship, and explains how it functions in the wider context of Kierkegaard’s thought. Concepts have been selected on the basis of their importance for Kierkegaard’s contributions to philosophy, theology, the social sciences, (...)
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  12. P. A. Minkus, J. A. Blair & R. H. Johnson (1980). Arguments That Aren't Arguments. Informal Logic: The First International Symposium, Ed. Ja Blair and Rh Johnson 69:76.score: 60.0
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  13. James Blair, A. A. Marsh, E. Finger, K. S. Blair & J. Luo (2006). Neuro-Cognitive Systems Involved in Morality. Philosophical Explorations 9 (1):13 – 27.score: 30.0
    In this paper, we will consider the neuro-cognitive systems involved in mediating morality. Five main claims will be made. First, that there are multiple, partially separable neuro-cognitive architectures that mediate specific aspects of morality: social convention, care-based morality, disgust-based morality and fairness/justice. Second, that all aspects of morality, including social convention, involve affect. Third, that the neural system particularly important for social convention, given its role in mediating anger and responding to angry expressions, is ventrolateral prefrontal cortex. Fourth, that the (...)
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  14. R. J. R. Blair (2008). The Cognitive Neuroscience of Psychopathy and Implications for Judgments of Responsibility. Neuroethics 1 (3):149-157.score: 30.0
    Psychopathy is a developmental disorder associated with specific forms of emotional dysfunction and an increased risk for both frustration-based reactive aggression and goal-directed instrumental antisocial behavior. While the full behavioral manifestation of the disorder is under considerable social influence, the basis of this disorder appears to be genetic. At the neural level, individuals with psychopathy show atypical responding within the amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). Moreover, the roles of the amygdala in stimulus-reinforcement learning and responding to emotional expressions and (...)
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  15. Clancy Blair (2006). How Similar Are Fluid Cognition and General Intelligence? A Developmental Neuroscience Perspective on Fluid Cognition as an Aspect of Human Cognitive Ability. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (2):109-125.score: 30.0
    This target article considers the relation of fluid cognitive functioning to general intelligence. A neurobiological model differentiating working memory/executive function cognitive processes of the prefrontal cortex from aspects of psychometrically defined general intelligence is presented. Work examining the rise in mean intelligence-test performance between normative cohorts, the neuropsychology and neuroscience of cognitive function in typically and atypically developing human populations, and stress, brain development, and corticolimbic connectivity in human and nonhuman animal models is reviewed and found to provide evidence of (...)
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  16. Fritz J. McDonald (2009). Linguistics, Psychology, and the Ontology of Language. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 9 (3):291-301.score: 30.0
    Noam Chomsky’s well-known claim that linguistics is a “branch of cognitive psychology” has generated a great deal of dissent—not from linguists or psychologists, but from philosophers. Jerrold Katz, Scott Soames, Michael Devitt, and Kim Sterelny have presented a number of arguments, intended to show that this Chomskian hypothesis is incorrect. On both sides of this debate, two distinct issues are often conflated: (1) the ontological status of language and (2) the relation between psychology and linguistics. The ontological issue is, I (...)
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  17. R. J. R. Blair (2007). What Emotional Responding is to Blame It Might Not Be to Responsibility. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (2):pp. 149-151.score: 30.0
  18. Jacob Blair (2011). Honor in the Military and the Possible Implication for the Traditional Separation of Jus Ad Bellum and Jus in Bello. In Applied Ethics Series (Center for Applied Ethics and Philosophy). 94-102.score: 30.0
    Traditional just war theory maintains that the two types of rules that govern justice in times of war, jus ad bellum (justice of war) and jus in bello (justice in war), are logically independent of one another. Call this the independence thesis. According to this thesis, a war that satisfies the ad bellum rules does not guarantee that the in bello rules will be satisfied; and a war that violates the ad bellum rules does not guarantee that the in bello (...)
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  19. George A. Blair (1967). The Meaning of “Energeia” and “Entelecheia” in Aristotle. International Philosophical Quarterly 7 (1):101-117.score: 30.0
  20. Fritz J. McDonald (2010). Agency and Responsibility. Journal of Value Inquiry 44 (2):199-207.score: 30.0
    According to Christine Korsgaard, Kantian hypothetical and categorical imperative principles are constitutive principles of agency. By acting in a way that is guided by these imperatives, an individual makes herself into an agent. There is hence, on her theory, an inextricable link between the nature of agency and the practical issue of why we should be rational and moral. The benefits of such an account would be great: in Korsgaard’s view, an account that bases morality on the nature of agency (...)
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  21. Chris MacDonald, Michael McDonald & Wayne Norman (2002). Charitable Conflicts of Interest. Journal of Business Ethics 39 (1-2):67 - 74.score: 30.0
    This paper looks at conflicts of interest in the not-for-profit sector. It examines the nature of conflicts of interest and why they are of ethical concern, and then focuses on the way not-for-profit organisations are especially prone to and vulnerable to conflict-of-interest scandals. Conflicts of interest corrode trust; and stakeholder trust (particularly from donors) is the lifeblood of most charities. We focus on some specific challenges faced by charitable organisations providing funding for scientific (usually medical) research, and examine a case (...)
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  22. Fritz J. McDonald (2009). A Deflationary Metaphysics of Morality. Acta Analytica 25 (3):285-298.score: 30.0
    The metaphysical dispute between moral realists and antirealists is cast in terms of properties: the realist holds that moral properties exist, the antirealist denies this claim. There is a longstanding philosophical dispute over the nature of properties, and the obscurity of properties may make the realist/antirealist dispute even more obscure. In the spirit of deflationary theories of truth, we can turn to a deflationary theory of properties in order to clarify this issue. One might reasonably worry that such an account (...)
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  23. Fritz J. McDonald (forthcoming). Review of Korsgaard's The Constitution of Agency (2008, OUP). [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice.score: 30.0
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  24. J. Anthony Blair (2012). Argumentation as Rational Persuasion. Argumentation 26 (1):71-81.score: 30.0
    I argue that argumentation is not to be identified with (attempted) rational persuasion, because although rational persuasion appears to consist of arguments, some uses of arguments are not attempts at rational persuasion. However, the use of arguments in argumentative communication to try to persuade is one kind of attempt at rational persuasion. What makes it rational is that its informing ideal is to persuade on the basis of adequate grounds, grounds that make it reasonable and rational to accept the claim (...)
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  25. Fritz J. McDonald (2010). Christine M. Korsgaard, the Constitution of Agency. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (2):235-236.score: 30.0
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  26. J. Anthony Blair (2001). Walton's Argumentation Schemes for Presumptive Reasoning: A Critique and Development. [REVIEW] Argumentation 15 (4):365-379.score: 30.0
    The aim of the paper is to advance the theory of argument or inference schemes by suggesting answers to questions raised by Walton's Argumentation Schemes for Presumptive Reasoning (1996), specifically on: the relation between argument and reasoning; distinguishing deductive from presumptive schemes, the origin of schemes and the probative force of their use; and the motivation and justification for their associated critical questions.
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  27. James R. Blair & Karina S. Perschardt (2001). Empathy: A Unitary Circuit or a Set of Dissociable Neuro-Cognitive Systems? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):27-28.score: 30.0
    We question whether empathy is mediated by a unitary circuit. We argue that recent neuroimaging data indicate dissociable neural responses for different facial expressions as well as for representing others' mental states (Theory of Mind, TOM). We also argue that the general empathy disorder considered characteristic of autism and psychopathy is not general but specific for each disorder.
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  28. Henry McDonald (2011). Levinas, Heidegger, and Hitlerism's Ontological Racism. The European Legacy 15 (7):891-896.score: 30.0
  29. Clancy Blair (2006). Toward a Revised Theory of General Intelligence: Further Examination of Fluid Cognitive Abilities as Unique Aspects of Human Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (2):145-153.score: 30.0
    Primary issues raised by the commentaries on the target article relate to (1) the need to differentiate distinct but overlapping aspects of fluid cognition, and (2) the implications that this differentiation may hold for conceptions of general intelligence. In response, I outline several issues facing researchers concerned with differentiation of human cognitive abilities and suggest that a revised and expanded theory of intelligence is needed to accommodate an increasingly diverse and varied empirical base. (Published Online April 5 2006).
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  30. Gael McDonald (2000). Cross-Cultural Methodological Issues in Ethical Research. Journal of Business Ethics 27 (1-2):89 - 104.score: 30.0
    Despite the fundamental and administrative difficulties associated with cross-cultural research the rewards are significant and, given an increasing trend toward globalisation, the move away from singular location studies to more comparative research is to be encouraged. In order to facilitate this research process it is imperative, however, that considerable attention is given to the methodological issues that can beset cross-cultural research, specifically as these issues relate to the primary domain or discipline of investigation, which in this instance is research on (...)
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  31. Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham, Colleen Varcoe, Annette J. Browne, M. Judith Lynam, Koushambhi Basu Khan & Heather McDonald (2009). Critical Inquiry and Knowledge Translation: Exploring Compatibilities and Tensions. Nursing Philosophy 10 (3):152-166.score: 30.0
    Knowledge translation has been widely taken up as an innovative process to facilitate the uptake of research-derived knowledge into health care services. Drawing on a recent research project, we engage in a philosophic examination of how knowledge translation might serve as vehicle for the transfer of critically oriented knowledge regarding social justice, health inequities, and cultural safety into clinical practice. Through an explication of what might be considered disparate traditions (those of critical inquiry and knowledge translation), we identify compatibilities (...)
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  32. Gael M. McDonald & Gabriel D. Donleavy (1995). Objections to the Teaching of Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 14 (10):839 - 853.score: 30.0
    To date the teaching of business ethics has been examined from the descriptive, prescriptive, and analytical perspectives. The descriptive perspective has reviewed the existence of ethics courses (e.g., Schoenfeldtet al., 1991; Bassiry, 1990; Mahoney, 1990; Singh, 1989), their historical development (e.g., Sims and Sims, 1991), and the format and syllabi of ethics courses (e.g., Hoffman and Moore, 1982). Alternatively, the prescriptive literature has centred on the pedagogical issues of teaching ethics (e.g., Hunt and Bullis, 1991; Strong and Hoffman, 1990; Reeves, (...)
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  33. R. J. R. Blair (2005). Responding to the Emotions of Others: Dissociating Forms of Empathy Through the Study of Typical and Psychiatric Populations. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (4):698-718.score: 30.0
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  34. Jacob Blair (2008). Tensions in a Certain Conception of Just War as Law Enforcement. Res Publica 14 (4):303-311.score: 30.0
    Many just war theorists (call them traditionalists) claim that just as people have a right to personal self-defense, so nations have a right to national-defense against an aggressive military invasion. David Rodin claims that the traditionalist is unable to justify most defensive wars against aggression. For most aggressive states only commit conditional aggression in that they threaten to kill or maim the citizens of the nation they are invading only if those citizens resist the occupation. Most wars, then, claimed to (...)
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  35. Sara A. Morris & Robert A. McDonald (1995). The Role of Moral Intensity in Moral Judgments: An Empirical Investigation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 14 (9):715 - 726.score: 30.0
    Jones (1991) has proposed an issue-contingent model of ethical decision making by individuals in organizations. The distinguishing feature of the issue was identified as its moral intensity, which determines the moral imperative in the situation. In this study, we adapted three scenarios from the literature in order to examine the issue-contingent model. Findings, based on a student sample, suggest that (1) the perceived and actual dimensions of moral intensity often differed; (2) perceived moral intensity variables, in the aggregate, significantly affected (...)
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  36. Gael M. McDonald (2005). A Case Example: Integrating Ethics Into the Academic Business Curriculum. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 54 (4):371 - 384.score: 30.0
    This paper combines a review of existing literature in the field of business ethics education and a case study relating to the integration of ethics into an undergraduate degree. Prior to any discussion relating to the integration of ethics into the business curriculum, we need to be cognisant of, and prepared for, the arguments raised by sceptics in both the business and academic environments, in regard to the teaching of ethics. Having laid this foundation, the paper moves to practical questions (...)
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  37. Hugh P. McDonald (2002). Dewey's Naturalism. Environmental Ethics 24 (2):189-208.score: 30.0
    In the recent literature of environmental ethics, certain criticisms of pragmatism in general and Dewey in particular have been made, specifically, that certain features of pragmatism make it unsuitable as an environmental ethic. Eric Katz asserts that pragmatism is an inherently anthropocentric and subjective philosophy. Bob Pepperman Taylor argues that Dewey’s naturalism in particular is anthropocentric in that it concentrates on human nature. I challenge both of these views in the context of Dewey’s naturalism. I discuss his naturalism, his critique (...)
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  38. Fritz McDonald (2003). Sense, Reference, and Philosophy [2003]: The Epimenidean Dilemma and the Definition of Truth. Philosophical Forum 34 (3-4):477–486.score: 30.0
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  39. J. A. Blair (1970). Four Essays on Liberty. By Isaiah Berlin. Oxford University Press. 1969. Pp. Lxiii, 213. $2.15. Dialogue 9 (02):266-268.score: 30.0
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  40. Michael McDonald & Susan Cox (2009). Moving Toward Evidence-Based Human Participant Protection. Journal of Academic Ethics 7 (1-2):1-16.score: 30.0
    There is near universal recognition that human participant protection is both morally and practically essential for all forms of research involving humans. Yet most of the discourse around human participant protection has focussed on norms—rules, regulations and governance arrangements—rather than on the actual effectiveness of these norms in achieving their ends—protecting participants from undue risk and ensuring respectful treatment as well as advancing the generation of useful knowledge. In recent years there has been increasing advocacy for evidence-based human participant protection (...)
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  41. Patrick McDonald (2008). Naturalistic Methodology in an Emerging Scientific Psychology: Lotze and Fechner in the Balance. Zygon 43 (3):605-625.score: 30.0
    The development of a methodologically naturalistic approach to physiological and experimental psychology in the nineteenth century was not primarily driven by a naturalistic agenda. The work of R. Hermann Lotze and G. T. Fechner help to illustrate this claim. I examine a selected set of central commitments in each thinkers philosophical outlook, particularly regarding the human soul and the nature of God, that departed strongly from a reductionist materialism. Yet, each contributed significantly to the formation of experimental and physiological psychology. (...)
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  42. Carole Blair, V. Balthrop & Neil Michel (2011). The Arguments of the Tombs of the Unknown: Relationality and National Legitimation. [REVIEW] Argumentation 25 (4):449-468.score: 30.0
    In the wake of the First World War, a new form of commemoration emerged internationally, but in each case focused upon a new kind of national “hero”—the unknown soldier or warrior. The first instances appeared in France and Britain in 1920, followed by the United States in 1921, and Belgium in 1922. Other nations followed suit over the years, with the most recent WWI Unknown Soldier monument dedicated in 2004, in New Zealand. The motivational calculus of these national tombs was, (...)
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  43. J. Anthony Blair (1998). The Limits of the Dialogue Model of Argument. Argumentation 12 (2):325-339.score: 30.0
    The paper's thesis is that dialogue is not an adequate model for all types of argument. The position of Walton is taken as the contrary view. The paper provides a set of descriptions of dialogues in which arguments feature in the order of the increasing complexity of the argument presentation at each turn of the dialogue, and argues that when arguments of great complexity are traded, the exchanges between arguers are turns of a dialogue only in an extended or metaphorical (...)
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  44. Julie M. McDonald (1995). The Presumption in Favor of Requirement Conflicts. Journal of Social Philosophy 26 (3):49-58.score: 30.0
  45. Tim Loughran, Bill McDonald & Hayong Yun (2009). A Wolf in Sheep's Clothing: The Use of Ethics-Related Terms in 10-K Reports. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (1):39 - 49.score: 30.0
    We examine the occurrence of ethicsrelated terms in 10-K annual reports over 1994-2006 and offer empirical observations on the conceptual framework of Erhard et al. (Integrity: A Positive Model that Incorporates the Normative Phenomena of Morality, Ethics, and Legality (Harvard Business School, Harvard) 2007). We use a pre-Sarbanes-Oxley sample subset to compare the occurrence of ethics-related terms in our 10-K data with samples from other studies that consider virtue-related phenomena. We find that firms using ethics-related terms are more likely to (...)
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  46. F. J. McDonald (2013). New Waves in Metaethics By Michael Brady * New Waves in Truth By Cory D. Wright and Nikolaj J.L.L. Pedersen. Analysis 73 (2):400-402.score: 30.0
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  47. Fritz J. McDonald (2008). Truth and Realism – Patrick Greenough and Michael P. Lynch. Philosophical Quarterly 58 (230):178–180.score: 30.0
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  48. David Paulsen & Brett McDonald (2008). Joseph Smith and the Trinity: An Analysis and Defense of the Social Model of the Godhead. Faith and Philosophy 25 (1):47-74.score: 30.0
    The theology of Joseph Smith remains controversial and at times divisive in the broader Christian community. This paper takes Smith’s trinitarian theologyas its point of departure and seeks to accomplish four interrelated goals: (1) to provide a general defense of “social trinitarianism” from some of the major objections raised against it; (2) to express what we take to be Smith’s understanding of the Trinity; (3) to analyze the state of modern ST and (4) to argue that, as a form of (...)
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  49. Ann Blair (2003). Reading Strategies for Coping With Information Overload Ca.1550-1700. Journal of the History of Ideas 64 (1):11-28.score: 30.0
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  50. Clancy Blair (2007). Inherent Limits on the Identification of a Neural Basis for General Intelligence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (2):154-155.score: 30.0
    The target article provides a thoughtful review and synthesis of studies examining the neural basis of cognitive abilities associated with intelligence test performance. In its attempt to present a new or generative theory of the neural basis for intelligence, however, the review faces specific limits to its theoretical model that relate to processes of development and the role of automaticity in cognition.
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