Search results for 'Blindsight' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Sean Allen-Hermanson (2010). Blindsight in Monkeys: Lost and (Perhaps) Found. Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (1-2): 47-71.score: 24.0
    Stoerig and Cowey’s work is widely regarded as showing that monkeys with lesions in the primary visual cortex have blindsight. However, Mole and Kelly persuasively argue that the experimental results are compatible with an alternative hypothesis positing only a deficit in attention and perceptual working memory. I describe a revised procedure which can distinguish these hypotheses, and offer reasons for thinking that the blindsight hypothesis provides a superior explanation. The study of blindsight might contribute towards a general (...)
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  2. Basileios Kroustallis (2005). Blindsight. Philosophical Psychology 18 (1):31-43.score: 24.0
    Blindsight is the ability of patients with an impaired visual cortex to perform visually in their blind field without acknowledging that performance. This ability has been interpreted as a sign of the absence of phenomenal consciousness, and neuroscientific studies have extensively studied cases of it. Different proposals separate visual form recognition from motion perception, and attempt to show that either the former or the latter is solely responsible for blindsight performance. However, a review of current experimental evidence shows (...)
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  3. Berit Brogaard (2012). Non-Visual Consciousness and Visual Images in Blindsight. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):595-596.score: 24.0
    In a recent response paper to Brogaard (2011a), Morten Overgaard and Thor Grünbaum argue that my case for the claim that blindsight subjects are not visually conscious of the stimuli they correctly identify rests on a mistaken necessary criterion for determining whether a conscious experience is visual or non-visual. Here I elaborate on the earlier argu- ment while conceding that the question of whether blindsight subjects are visually con- scious of the visual stimuli they correctly identify largely is (...)
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  4. J. Campion, R. Latto & Y. Smith (1983). Is Blindsight an Effect of Scattered Light, Spared Cortex, and Near-Threshold Vision? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (3):423-86.score: 24.0
    Blindsight is the term commonly used to describe visually guided behaviour elicited by a stimulus falling within the scotoma (blind area) caused by a lesion of the striate cortex. Such is normally held to be unconscious and to be mediated by subcortical pathways involving the superior colliculus. Blindsight is of considerable theoretical importance since it suggests that destriate man is more like destriate monkey than had been previously believed and also because it supports the classical notion of two (...)
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  5. Petra Stoerig (2010). Cueless Blindsight. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.score: 24.0
    The term blindsight describes the non-reflexive visual functions that remain or recover in fields of absolute cortical blindness. As visual stimuli confined to such fields are subjectively invisible, they are customarily announced by visible or audible cues that inform the patients when to respond. The pervasive use of cueing has spawned the widely held assumption that sight and blindsight differ in that only blindsight requires cueing. To test this assumption, we measured detection of auditorily cued and un-cued (...)
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  6. Lawrence Weiskrantz (1986). Blindsight: A Case Study and Implications. Oxford University Press.score: 21.0
    within-field task as testing proceeded. (In any case, the two-field task is presumably a more difficult one than the one-field task. ...
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  7. James Danckert & Melvyn A. Goodale (2000). Blindsight: A Conscious Route to Unconscious Vision. Current Biology 10 (1):31-43.score: 21.0
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  8. Robert W. Kentridge, Charles A. Heywood & Lawrence Weiskrantz (1999). Attention Without Awareness in Blindsight. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B 266:1805-11.score: 21.0
  9. Thomas Natsoulas (1997). Blindsight and Consciousness. American Journal of Psychology 110:1-33.score: 21.0
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  10. Berit Brogaard, Kristian Marlow & Kevin Rice (2014). Unconscious Influences on Decision Making in Blindsight. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (1):22-23.score: 21.0
  11. J. Zihl (1980). "Blindsight": Improvement of Visually Guided Eye Movements by Systematic Practice in Patients with Cerebral Blindness. Neuropsychologia 18 (1):71-77.score: 21.0
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  12. Petra Stoerig (2011). Task-Irrelevant Blindsight and the Impact of Invisible Stimuli. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 21.0
    Despite their subjective invisibility, stimuli presented within regions of absolute cortical blindness can both guide forced-choice behaviour when they are task-relevant and modulate responses to visible targets when they are task-irrelevant. We here tested three hemianopic patients to learn whether their performance in an attention-demanding rapid serial visual presentation task would be affected by task-irrelevant stimuli. Per trial, nine black letters and one white target-letter appeared briefly at fixation; the white letter was to be named at the end of each (...)
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  13. Lawrence Weiskrantz (2000). Blindsight: Implications for the Conscious Experience of Emotion. In Richard D. R. Lane, L. Nadel & G. L. Ahern (eds.), Cognitive Neuroscience of Emotion. Oxford University Press. 31-43.score: 21.0
  14. Lawrence Weiskrantz (1995). Blindsight: Conscious Vs. Unconscious Aspects. In Joseph E. King & Karl H. Pribram (eds.), Scale in Conscious Experience. Lawrence Erlbaum. 31-43.score: 21.0
  15. Lawrence Weiskrantz (1995). Blindsight: Not an Island Unto Itself. Current Directions in Psychological Science 4 (1):146-151.score: 21.0
     
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  16. Christopher Mole & Sean D. Kelly (2006). On the Demonstration of Blindsight in Monkeys. Mind and Language 21 (4):475-483.score: 18.0
    The work of Alan Cowey and Petra Stoerig is often taken to have shown that, following lesions analogous to those that cause blindsight in humans, there is blindsight in monkeys. The present paper reveals a problem in Cowey and Stoerig's case for blindsight in monkeys. The problem is that Cowey and Stoerig's results would only provide good evidence for blindsight if there is no difference between their two experimental paradigms with regard to the sorts of stimuli (...)
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  17. Paul Azzopardi & Alan Cowey (1998). Blindsight and Visual Awareness. Consciousness and Cognition 7 (3):292-311.score: 18.0
    Some patients with damaged striate cortex have blindsight-the ability to discriminate unseen stimuli in their clinically blind visual field defects when forced-choice procedures are used. Blindsight implies a sharp dissociation between visual performance and visual awareness, but signal detection theory indicates that it might be indistinguishable from the behavior of normal subjects near the lower limit of conscious vision, where the dissociations could arise trivially from using different response criteria during clinical and forced-choice tests. We tested the latter (...)
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  18. Berit Brogaard (2011). Color Experience in Blindsight? Philosophical Psychology 24 (6):767 - 786.score: 18.0
    Blindsight, the ability to blindly discriminate wavelength and other aspects of stimuli in a blind field, sometimes occurs in people with lesions to striate (V1) cortex. There is currently no consensus on whether qualitative color information of the sort that is normally computed by double opponent cells in striate cortex is indeed computed in blindsight but doesn?t reach awareness, perhaps owing to abnormal neuron responsiveness in striate or extra-striate cortical areas, or is not computed at all. The existence (...)
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  19. L. M. Vaina (1995). Akinetopsia, Achromatopsia and Blindsight: Recent Studies on Perception Without Awareness. Synthese 105 (3):253-271.score: 18.0
    The neural substrate of early visual processing in the macaque is used as a framework to discuss recent progress towards a precise anatomical localization and understanding of the functional implications of the syndromes of blindsight, achromatopsia and akinetopsia in humans. This review is mainly concerned with how these syndromes support the principles of organization of the visual system into parallel pathways and the functional hierarchy of visual mechanisms.
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  20. Gerald Vision (1998). Blindsight and Philosophy. Philosophical Psychology 11 (2):137-59.score: 18.0
    The evidence of blindsight is occasionally used to argue that we can see things, and thus have perceptual belief, without the distinctive visual awareness accompanying normal sight; thereby displacing phenomenality as a component of the concept of vision. I maintain that arguments to this end typically rely on misconceptions about blindsight and almost always ignore associated visual (or visuomotor) pathologies relevant to the lessons of such cases. More specifically, I conclude, first, that the phenomena very likely do not (...)
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  21. Charles A. Heywood, Robert W. Kentridge & Alan Cowey (1998). Cortical Color Blindness is Not ''Blindsight for Color''. Consciousness and Cognition 7 (3):410-423.score: 18.0
    Cortical color blindness, or cerebral achromatopsia, has been likened by some authors to ''blindsight'' for color or an instance of ''covert'' processing of color. Recently, it has been shown that, although such patients are unable to identify or discriminate hue differences, they nevertheless show a striking ability to process wavelength differences, which can result in preserved sensitivity to chromatic contrast and motion in equiluminant displays. Moreover, visually evoked cortical potentials can still be elicited in response to chromatic stimuli. We (...)
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  22. K. Kranda (1998). Blindsight in the Blind Spot. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (6):762-763.score: 18.0
    The filling-in process proposed as a cover up for the existence of the blind spot has some conceptual similarities to blindsight. The perceptual operation of a hypothetical mechanism responsible for filling in represents a logical paradox. The apparent indeterminacy of the percept in the optic-disc region can be tested experimentally by viewing the grating test pattern below.
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  23. Jason Holt (2003). Blindsight and the Nature of Consciousness. Broadview Press.score: 18.0
    Ever since its discovery nearly thirty years ago, the phenomenon of blindsight — vision without visual consciousness — has been the source of great controversy in the philosophy of mind, psychology, and the neurosciences. Despite the fact that blindsight is widely acknowledged to be a critical test-case for theories of mind, Blindsight and the Nature of Consciousness is the first extended treatment of the phenomenon from a philosophical perspective. Holt argues, against much received wisdom, for a thorough-going (...)
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  24. Lawrence Weiskrantz (2009). Blindsight: A Case Study Spanning 35 Years and New Developments. OUP Oxford.score: 18.0
    Blindsight is an unusual condition where the sufferer can respond to visual stimuli, while lacking any conscious feeling of having seen the stimuli. It occurs after a particular form of brain injury. The first edition of 'Blindsight', by one of the pioneers in the field - Lawrence Weiskrantz, reported studies of a patient with this condition. It was an important, much cited publication. In the past twenty years, further work has been done in this area, and this new (...)
     
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  25. Morten Overgaard (2011). Visual Experience and Blindsight: A Methodological Review. Experimental Brain Research 209:473-479.score: 18.0
    Blindsight is classically defined as residual visual capacity, e.g., to detect and identify visual stimuli, in the total absence of perceptual awareness following lesions to V1. However, whereas most experiments have investigated what blindsight patients can and cannot do, the literature contains several, often contradictory, remarks about remaining visual experience. This review examines closer these remarks as well as experiments that directly approach the nature of possibly spared visual experiences in blindsight.
     
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  26. Peter Carruthers (2001). Who is Blind to Blindsight? Psyche 7 (4).score: 15.0
  27. Jason Holt (1999). Blindsight in Debates About Qualia. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (5):54-71.score: 15.0
  28. Alan Cowey (2004). The 30th Sir Frederick Bartlett Lecture: Fact, Artefact, and Myth About Blindsight. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology A 57 (4):577-609.score: 15.0
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  29. Alan Cowey & Petra Stoerig (1991). The Neurobiology of Blindsight. Trends in Neurosciences 14:140-5.score: 15.0
  30. Lawrence Weiskrantz (2002). Prime-Sight and Blindsight. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):568-581.score: 15.0
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  31. Lawrence Weiskrantz (1996). Blindsight Revisited. Current Opinion in Neurobiology 6:215-220.score: 15.0
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  32. James Danckert & Yves Rossetti (2005). Blindsight in Action: What Can the Different Sub-Types of Blindsight Tell Us About the Control of Visually Guided Actions? Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews 29 (7):1035-1046.score: 15.0
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  33. Silke Anders, Niels Birbaumer, Bettina Sadowski, Michael Erb, Irina Mader, Wolfgang Grodd & Martin Lotze (2004). Parietal Somatosensory Association Cortex Mediates Affective Blindsight. Nature Neuroscience 7 (4):339-340.score: 15.0
  34. Hakwan C. Lau & Richard E. Passingham (2006). Relative Blindsight in Normal Observers and the Neural Correlate of Visual Consciousness. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 103 (49):18763-18768.score: 15.0
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  35. Paul Azzopardi & Alan Cowey (1997). Is Blindsight Like Normal, Near-Threshold Vision? Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Usa 94 (25):14190-14194.score: 15.0
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  36. Anthony J. Marcel (1998). Blindsight and Shape Perception: Deficit of Visual Consciousness or of Visual Function? Brain 121:1565-88.score: 15.0
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  37. Alan Cowey & Petra Stoerig (1997). Visual Detection in Monkeys with Blindsight. Neuopsychologia 35:929-39.score: 15.0
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  38. Morris J. Morgan, A. J. S. Mason & J. A. Solomon (1997). Blindsight in Normal Subjects? Nature 385:401-2.score: 15.0
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  39. Alan Cowey (1995). Blindsight in Monkeys. Nature 373:247-9.score: 15.0
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  40. F. C. Kolb & Jochen Braun (1995). Blindsight in Normal Observers. Nature 377:336-8.score: 15.0
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  41. Victor A. F. Lamme (2001). Blindsight: The Role of Feedforward and Feedback Corticocortical Connections. Acta Psychologica 107 (1):209-228.score: 15.0
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  42. Charles A. Heywood & Robert W. Kentridge (2000). Affective Blindsight? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (4):125-126.score: 15.0
  43. Iona Alexander & Alan Cowey (2010). Edges, Colour and Awareness in Blindsight. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (2):520-533.score: 15.0
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  44. Beatrice de Gelder, Jean Vroomen, Gilles Pourtois & Lawrence Weiskrantz (2000). Affective Blindsight: Are We Blindly Led by Emotions? Response to Heywood and Kentridge (2000). Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (4):126-127.score: 15.0
  45. Robert W. Kentridge, Charles A. Heywood & Lawrence Weiskrantz (2004). Spatial Attention Speeds Discrimination Without Awareness in Blindsight. Neuropsychologia 42 (6):831-835.score: 15.0
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  46. Tony Ro & Robert Rafal (2006). Visual Restoration in Cortical Blindness: Insights From Natural and TMS-Induced Blindsight. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 16 (4):377-396.score: 15.0
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  47. Petra Stoerig & Alan Cowey (1989). Wavelength Sensitivity in Blindsight. Nature 342:916-18.score: 15.0
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  48. O. Braddick, J. Atkinson, B. Hood & W. Harkness (1992). Possible Blindsight in Infants Lacking One Cerebral Hemisphere. Nature 360:461-463.score: 15.0
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  49. Michael S. Gazzaniga, R. Fendrich & C. M. Wessinger (1994). Blindsight Reconsidered. Current Directions in Psychological Science 3:93-96.score: 15.0
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  50. Petra Stoerig & Alan Cowey (1997). Blindsight in Man and Monkey. Brain 120:535-59.score: 15.0
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