5 found
Sort by:
  1. Helena Granström & Bo Göranzon (2013). Turing's Man: A Dialogue. [REVIEW] AI and Society 28 (1):21-25.
    soft servants of durable material: they live without pretension in complicated relays and electrical circuits. Speed, docility are their strength. One asks: “What is 2 × 2?”—“Are you a machine?” They answer or refuse to answer, depending on what you demand. There are, however, other machines as well, more abstract automatons, bolder and more inaccessible, which eat their tape in mathematical formulae. They imitate in language. In infinite loops, farther and farther back in their retreat towards more subtle algorithms, more (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Bo Göranzon (2007). Tacit Knowledge and Risks. AI and Society 21 (4):429-442.
    How are risks and disasters prevented in high-technology environments? This is a question that has many facets. In this essay I shall discuss the aspects related to the history of knowledge, and to tacit knowledge in particular.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Bo Göranzon (1997). Leadership: Implementation of Theory or Development of Practical Skills? [REVIEW] AI and Society 11 (1-2):166-176.
    The article gives accounts of case study work in the field of Skill and Technology, whereby dialogue is developed as a tool to stimulate innovation in industrial, community and creative contexts. The work has been conducted at the Royal Institute of Technology in association with the National Institute for Working Life and the Dialogue Seminar of the Royal Dramatic Theatre, Stockholm. It includes both accounts of practice and theoretical reflections, drawing on a European cultural context.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Bo Göranzon, Magnus Florin & Pehr Sällström (1988). The Concept of Dialogue. AI and Society 2 (4):279-286.
  5. Bo Göranzon (1987). The Practice of the Use of Computers. AI and Society 1 (1):25-36.
    A quotation from Shakespeare's play King Lear, ‘I will teach you differences’, encapsulates the spirit of this paper. The distinction is introduced between three different categories of knowledge: i) propositional knowledge, ii) skill or practical knowledge and iii) knowledge of familiarity. In the present debate on ‘Information Society’, there is a clear tendency to overemphasise the theoretical knowledge at the expense of practical knowledge thereby completely ignoring the knowledge of familiarity. It is argued that different forms of theoretical knowledge are (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation