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  1. Bob Brecher (2014). Practical Reasoning: A Guide for the Perplexed. Res Publica 20 (3):323-326.
    Despite its title, this is an extremely useful book: the first four of its five chapters expound the standard range of theories of practical reasoning more clearly and accurately than one might have thought possible. A measure of Schaubroeck’s authoritative handling of her material is her ability to navigate the peaks, troughs and crevasses of the myriad variations of ‘internalism’ and ‘externalism’ without inducing either vertigo or fury. Thus she patiently guides the reader through the stupefying obstacles along the route (...)
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  2. Bob Brecher (2014). Torture and its Apologists. In Andrew I. Cohen & Christopher H. Wellman (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Applied Ethics. Wiley Blackwell. 22--260.
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  3. Bob Brecher, Academic Freedom.
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  4. Bob Brecher (2013). Holocaust. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  5. Bob Brecher, The Holocaust.
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  6. Bob Brecher, Pornography: Men Possessing Women. A Reassessment.
    For a few years in the 1980s, Andrea Dworkin’s Pornography: Men Possessing Women appeared to have changed the intellectual landscape – as well as some people’s lives. Pornography, she argued, not only constitutes violence against women; it constitutes also the main conduit for such violence, of which rape is at once the prime example and the central image. In short, it is patriarchy’s most powerful weapon. Given that, feminists’ single most important task is to deal with pornography. By the early (...)
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  7. Bob Brecher (2012). The Family and Neoliberalism: Time to Revive a Critique. Ethics and Social Welfare 6 (2):157-167.
    I argue that the family remains integral to neoliberal capitalism. First, I identify two tensions in the neoliberals' advocacy of the traditional family: that the ?family values? advocated run directly counter to the homo economicus of the ?free market?; and the fact that the increasingly strident rhetoric of the family belies its decreasing popularity. The implications of these tensions for how we might think of the family, I then propose, suggest that earlier critiques are worth revisiting for what they have (...)
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  8. Bob Brecher, The "Ticking Bomb": A Spurious Argument for Torture.
    The so-called ticking bomb is invoked by philosophers and lawyers trying to justify, on behalf of their political masters, the use of torture in extremis. I show that the scenario is spurious; and that the likely consequences of the use of interrogational torture in such cases are disastrous. Finally, I test the argument against a real case.
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  9. Bob Brecher, Why Torture is Wrong.
    Even people who think torture is justified in certain circumstances regard it - to say the least - as undesirable, however necessary they think it is. So I approach the issue by analysing the extreme case where people such as Dershowitz, Posner and Walzer think torture is justified, the so-called ticking bomb scenario. And since the justification offered is always consequentialist - no one thinks that torture is in any way “good in itself” – I confine myself to consequentialist arguments. (...)
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  10. Bob Brecher (2011). Democracy and Social Justice. Studies in Social Justice 5 (2):145-147.
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  11. Bob Brecher, Torture: A Touchstone for Global Social Justice.
    This chapter considers the wider significance of torture, addressing the manner in which it represents a touchstone for any universalistic morality, and arguing that it offers a means of refuting any moral relativism, something that ties in closely with my long-term theoretical work in metaethics (eg Getting What You Want? A Critique of Liberal Morality (Routledge: London and New York, 1998; and ongoing work around the ultimate justification of morality). Since torture consists in the erasure of a person on the (...)
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  12. Bob Brecher, Which Values and Whose?
    Fulford’s discussion of ‘values-based practice’ as a model for medical ethics is deeply puzzling. First, it remains unclear what exactly he takes values to be or how tyhey can be based in clinical skills. Second, his proposal does not make it clear whose values these are supposed to be. I conclude that his attempt in effect to take the morality out of ethics fails.
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  13. Bob Brecher (2010). The New Order of War. Rodopi.
    That much goes without saying. What is controversial, however, is how we might understand and respond to these new wars. This book offers a new approach.
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  14. Bob Brecher (2010). The Politics of Professional Ethics. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (2):351-355.
    In order to illustrate how terms of reference themselves, such as those announced by ‘professional ethics’, delimit and distort moral consideration I start with an extended discussion of how Just War Theory operates to do this; and go on to discuss ‘the power of naming’ with reference to the British attack on Iraq. Having thus situated my approach to the politics of professional ethics in a broader political context I offer a critique of ‘professional’ ethics in terms of what is (...)
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  15. Bob Brecher, Mark Devenney & Aaron Winter (eds.) (2010). Discourses and Practices of Terrorism. Routledge.
    Arising out of one of the annual conferences I organise as Director of the University’s Centre for Applied Philosophy, Politics and Ethics (see http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/research/cappe/) -- ‘Interrogating Terror’ – and from my work on the editorial board of Critical Studies on Terrorism, this collection is published in the Routledge Critical Terrorism Studies series and brings together theoretical and empirical material to challenge the notion that ‘terrorism’ and/or ‘terror’ are transparent, given or limited to non-state agents. Instead, it seeks to expose the (...)
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  16. Bob Brecher, Interrogation, Intelligence and Ill-Treatment: Lessons From Northern Ireland, 1971-72.
    In 2008, Samantha Newbery, then a PhD student, discovered a hitherto confidential document: ‘Confidential: UK Eyes Only. Annex A: Intelligence gained from interrogations in Northern Ireland’ (DEFE 13/958, The National Archives (TNA)). It details the British Army’s notorious interrogations of IRA suspects that led to the eventual banning of the ‘five techniques’ that violated the UK’s international treaty obligation prohibiting the use of torture and ‘inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment’. Having decided that the document – Intelligence gained from should (...)
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  17. Bob Brecher, Tortue and the Ticking Bomb.
    We live in times when, as Conor Gearty has pointed out, ‘legal scholars in the US are being taken seriously when they float the idea of torture warrants as a reform to what they see as the unacceptably uncodified system of arbitrary torture that they believe currently prevails’. And he is right when he goes on to add that ‘This is like reacting to a series of police killings with proposals to reform the law on homicide so as to sanction (...)
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  18. Bob Brecher, Communitarianism: The Practice of Postmodern Liberalism.
    The chapter argues that communitarianism is the ‘postmodern bourgeois liberalism’ that Rorty, probably the leading avowedly epistemological, rather than political, or merely political, communitarian, describes himself as espousing. Proceeding by way of a detailed discussion of Philip Selznick’s definitive ‘Social Justice: a Communitarian Perspective’-- in which he seeks ‘to reaffirm, and to clarify if I can, the communitarian commitment to social justice’ -- I show that rooted in the particular as communitarianism is, it cannot but reflect the values, beliefs and (...)
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  19. Bob Brecher, 'In its Own Image': Neo-Liberalism and the Managerialist University.
    I argue that neo-liberalism requires a managerialist view of our universities; and to the extent that managerialism cannot be ameliorated, to that extent neo-liberalism signals the end of universities as places of learning. Rather than calling for “friendlier” management practice, we need to organise opposition by articulating and rallying around some vision of what the ends should be of the university, and which managing such an institution should therefore serve. Such a vision, whatever exactly its details might consist in, would (...)
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  20. Bob Brecher (2006). Reparation, Responsibility and the Memory Game. Res Publica 12 (2):213-221.
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  21. Bob Brecher, The Politics of Humanism.
    This chapter argues against Frank Furedi’s urging of a ‘pre-political’ humanism. Having considered the possible bases of appeals to "human nature" as a starting-point for political claims, I argue that, unless we already have a pre-existent non- or anti-humanist commitment, the movement in appeals to "human nature" is from our philosophical/political commitment to our view of it. But since that is precisely what the call for a pre-political humanism opposes, it founders on two difficulties. First, in what sense might a (...)
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  22. Bob Brecher (2006). The Politics of Medical and Health Ethics: Collapsing Goods and the Moral Climate. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 40 (2-3):359-370.
    In responding to Thomas Magnell's notion of 'collapsing goods', I draw attention to how medical and health ethics practices are not innocent, but political; and to suggest something about their relation to the moral climate. More specifically, I show that to take them as innocent, or as politically neutral, is not only a misunderstanding, but one that is likely to impact on the moral climate as well as being already a reflection of it. Ethics, and the various practices and understandings (...)
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  23. Bob Brecher, Complicity and Modularization: How Universities Were Made Safe for the Market.
    Education has always occupied a contradictory position in society, expected to ensure compliance and continuity and yet to encourage critique and renewal. Since the early 1980s, however, successive UK governments have directly mobilised education, and higher education in particular, as an ideological tool in the task of embedding neo-liberalism as ‘common sense’. Modularisation has been in the vanguard, first in the universities, more latterly at secondary level. The effect has been disastrous: here as elsewhere, choice has become depressingly fetishised; knowledge, (...)
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  24. Bob Brecher (2005). Moral Obligation and Everyday Advice. South African Journal of Philosophy 24 (2):109-120.
    A major obstacle in the way of any rationalistic understanding of morality is that the moral ‘ought' obliges action: and on the (neo-)Humean view, action is thought to require affect. If, however, one could show that “ordinary” practical reasons are by themselves action-guiding, then moral reasons – a particular sort of practical reasons – also have no need of desire to “move” us to act. So how does the practical ‘ought' work? To answer that, we need to ask what exactly (...)
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  25. Bob Brecher (2005). Morality, Professions and Ideals. Philosophy of Management 5 (3):79-81.
    Paul Griseri’s generous response to my ‘Against Professional Ethics’ offers an interesting point of view and there is much on which we agree. But we continue to differ about the nature of the primacy of morality, the possibility of a ‘general idea of professionalism’ and - perhaps - about Kant’s Categorical Imperative.
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  26. Bob Brecher (2004). Against Professional Ethics. Philosophy of Management 4 (2):3-8.
    I argue that the current popularity of 'ethics' in general, and the extension of 'professional ethics in particular, masks an increasingly unethical culture. Furthermore, attempts to codify ethics encourage a rule-governed approach, thus misunderstanding the nature of ethical practice and - whether or not inadvertently - serving to protect the professions from ethical considerations rather than the opposite.
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  27. Bob Brecher (2003). Ethics, Management and Mythology by Michael Loughlin. Philosophy of Management 3 (1):66-68.
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  28. Doris Schroeder & Bob Brecher (2003). Transgenerational Obligations: Twenty-First Century Germany and the Holocaust. Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (1):45–57.
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  29. Bob Brecher (2002). Our Obligation to the Dead. Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (2):109–119.
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  30. Bob Brecher (1999). Instructions for Authors. Res Publica 5 (1):109-112.
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  31. Bob Brecher (1999). Understanding the Holocaust-The Uniqueness Debate. Radical Philosophy 96:17-28.
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  32. Bob Brecher (1998). The Moronic Inferno. Res Publica 4 (2):241-250.
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  33. Bob Brecher (1997). Getting What You Want?: A Critique of Liberal Morality. Routledge.
    Getting What You Want? is the first book which calls for the collapse of liberal morality. Bob Brecher claims that it is wrong to think that morality is simply rooted in what people want. He explains that in our consumerist society, we make the assumption that getting 'what people want' is our natural goal, and that this 'natural goal' is a necessarily good one. We see that whether it is a matter of pornography or getting married - if people want (...)
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  34. Bob Brecher (1997). Rorty Through the Looking-Glass. Res Publica 3 (1):105-114.
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  35. Bob Brecher (1997). What Would a Socialist Health Service Look Like? Health Care Analysis 5 (3):217-225.
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  36. Bob Brecher (1996). Fair and Effective Resource Allocation in Cancer Care: Uncharted Territory? Paper Four: How Should We Think About Resource Allocation? Health Care Analysis 4 (1):37-40.
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  37. Bob Brecher (1996). Paper Four: How Should We Think About Resource Allocation? [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 4 (1):37-40.
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  38. Bob Brecher (1993). Why Patronize Feminists? A Reply to Stove on Mill. Philosophy 68 (265):397 - 400.
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  39. Bob Brecher (1992). In Defence of Reason. The Personalist Forum 8 (1):35-40.
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  40. Bob Brecher (1987). Surrogacy, Liberal Individualism and the Moral Climate. Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 22:183-197.
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  41. Bob Brecher (1976). Descartes' Causal Argument for the Existence of God. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 7 (3):418 - 432.
  42. Bob Brecher (1974). Aquinas on Anselm. Philosophical Studies 23:63-66.
  43. Bob Brecher (1974). Kant's Dialectic. Philosophical Studies 23:265-267.
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  44. Bob Brecher (1974). Proslogion II and III, A Third Interpretation of Anselm's Argument. Philosophical Studies 23:314-317.
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