24 found
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  1.  23
    Joseph C. Toscano & Bob McMurray (2010). Cue Integration with Categories: Weighting Acoustic Cues in Speech Using Unsupervised Learning and Distributional Statistics. Cognitive Science 34 (3):434.
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  2.  18
    Bob McMurray, Kristine A. Kovack-Lesh, Dresden Goodwin & William McEchron (2013). Infant Directed Speech and the Development of Speech Perception: Enhancing Development or an Unintended Consequence? Cognition 129 (2):362-378.
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  3.  3
    Jessica S. Horst, Larissa K. Samuelson, Sarah C. Kucker & Bob McMurray (2011). What's New? Children Prefer Novelty in Referent Selection. Cognition 118 (2):234-244.
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  4.  13
    Bob McMurray & Richard N. Aslin (2005). Infants Are Sensitive to Within-Category Variation in Speech Perception. Cognition 95 (2):B15-B26.
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  5.  6
    Bob McMurray, Michael K. Tanenhaus & Richard N. Aslin (2002). Gradient Effects of Within-Category Phonetic Variation on Lexical Access. Cognition 86 (2):B33-B42.
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  6. Bob McMurray, Jessica S. Horst & Larissa K. Samuelson (2012). Word Learning Emerges From the Interaction of Online Referent Selection and Slow Associative Learning. Psychological Review 119 (4):831-877.
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  7.  1
    Efthymia C. Kapnoula, Stephanie Packard, Prahlad Gupta & Bob McMurray (2015). Immediate Lexical Integration of Novel Word Forms. Cognition 134:85-99.
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  8.  6
    James S. Magnuson, Bob McMurray, Michael K. Tanenhaus & Richard N. Aslin (2003). Lexical Effects on Compensation for Coarticulation: The Ghost of Christmash Past. Cognitive Science 27 (2):285-298.
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  9.  7
    Bob McMurray (2016). Language at Three Timescales: The Role of Real‐Time Processes in Language Development and Evolution. Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (2):393-407.
    Evolutionary developmental systems theory stresses that selection pressures operate on entire developmental systems rather than just genes. This study extends this approach to language evolution, arguing that selection pressure may operate on two quasi-independent timescales. First, children clearly must acquire language successfully and evolution must equip them with the tools to do so. Second, while this is developing, they must also communicate with others in the moment using partially developed knowledge. These pressures may require different solutions, and their combination may (...)
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  10.  23
    Keith S. Apfelbaum & Bob McMurray (2011). Using Variability to Guide Dimensional Weighting: Associative Mechanisms in Early Word Learning. Cognitive Science 35 (6):1105-1138.
    At 14 months, children appear to struggle to apply their fairly well-developed speech perception abilities to learning similar sounding words (e.g., bih/dih; Stager & Werker, 1997). However, variability in nonphonetic aspects of the training stimuli seems to aid word learning at this age. Extant theories of early word learning cannot account for this benefit of variability. We offer a simple explanation for this range of effects based on associative learning. Simulations suggest that if infants encode both noncontrastive information (e.g., cues (...)
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  11.  2
    Keith S. Apfelbaum & Bob McMurray (2016). Learning During Processing: Word Learning Doesn't Wait for Word Recognition to Finish. Cognitive Science 40 (6).
    Previous research on associative learning has uncovered detailed aspects of the process, including what types of things are learned, how they are learned, and where in the brain such learning occurs. However, perceptual processes, such as stimulus recognition and identification, take time to unfold. Previous studies of learning have not addressed when, during the course of these dynamic recognition processes, learned representations are formed and updated. If learned representations are formed and updated while recognition is ongoing, the result of learning (...)
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  12. Bob McMurray & Allard Jongman (2011). What Information is Necessary for Speech Categorization? Harnessing Variability in the Speech Signal by Integrating Cues Computed Relative to Expectations. Psychological Review 118 (2):219-246.
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  13.  14
    Colleen Mitchell & Bob McMurray (2009). On Leveraged Learning in Lexical Acquisition and Its Relationship to Acceleration. Cognitive Science 33 (8):1503-1523.
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  14.  13
    Colleen C. Mitchell & Bob McMurray (2008). A Stochastic Model for the Vocabulary Explosion. In B. C. Love, K. McRae & V. M. Sloutsky (eds.), Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society 1919--1926.
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  15.  2
    James S. Magnuson, Bob McMurray, Michael K. Tanenhaus & Richard N. Aslin (2003). Lexical Effects on Compensation for Coarticulation: A Tale of Two Systems? Cognitive Science 27 (5):801-805.
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  16.  1
    Tanja C. Roembke, Edward A. Wasserman & Bob McMurray (forthcoming). Learning in Rich Networks Involves Both Positive and Negative Associations. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General.
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  17.  45
    Bob McMurray & David Gow (2005). It's Not How Many Dimensions You Have, It's What You Do with Them: Evidence From Speech Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (1):31-31.
    Contrary to Pothos, rule- and similarity-based processes cannot be distinguished by dimensionality. Rather, one must consider the goal of the processing: what the system will do with the resulting representations. Research on speech perception demonstrates that the degree to which speech categories are gradient (or similarity-based) is a function of the utility of within-category variation for further processing.
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  18.  7
    Edward A. Wasserman, Daniel I. Brooks & Bob McMurray (2015). Pigeons Acquire Multiple Categories in Parallel Via Associative Learning: A Parallel to Human Word Learning? Cognition 136:99-122.
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  19.  4
    Bob McMurray & Edward Wasserman (2009). Variability in Languages, Variability in Learning? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):459-460.
    In documenting the dizzying diversity of human languages, Evans & Levinson (E&L) highlight the lack of universals. This suggests the need for complex learning. Yet, just as there is no universal structure, there may be no universal learning mechanism responsible for language. Language is a behavior assembled by many processes, an assembly guided by the language being learned.
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  20.  7
    Michael K. Tanenhaus, James S. Magnuson, Bob McMurray & Richard N. Aslin (2000). No Compelling Evidence Against Feedback in Spoken Word Recognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (3):348-349.
    Norris et al.'s claim that feedback is unnecessary is compromised by (1) a questionable application of Occam's razor, given strong evidence for feedback in perception; (2) an idealization of the speech recognition problem that simplifies those aspects of the input that create conditions where feedback is useful; (3) Norris et al.'s use of decision nodes that incorporate feedback to model some important empirical results; and (4) problematic linking hypotheses between crucial simulations and behavioral data.
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  21.  2
    Bob McMurray, Joel L. Dennhardt & Andrew Struck‐Marcell (2008). Context Effects on Musical Chord Categorization: Different Forms of Top‐Down Feedback in Speech and Music? Cognitive Science 32 (5):893-920.
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  22. Efthymia C. Kapnoula & Bob McMurray (2016). Training Alters the Resolution of Lexical Interference: Evidence for Plasticity of Competition and Inhibition. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 145 (1):8-30.
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  23. Bob McMurray, Joel Dennhardt & Andrew Struck-Marcell (2008). Context Effects on Musical Chord Categorization: Different Forms of Top-Down Feedback in Speech and Music? Cognitive Science: A Multidisciplinary Journal 32 (5):893-920.
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  24. Tim Wifall, Bob McMurray & Eliot Hazeltine (2014). Perceptual Similarity Affects the Learning Curve. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 143 (1):312-331.
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