Search results for 'Bodhicitta (Buddhism' (try it on Scholar)

8 found
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  1. Minoru Kiyota (1983). Tantric Concept of Bodhicitta: A Buddhist Experiential Philosophy (an Exposition Based Upon the Mah⁻Avairocana-S⁻Utra, Bodhicitta-Ś⁻Astra and Sokushin-J⁻Obutsu-Gi). South Asian Area Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison.
     
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    Heesoon Bai & Avraham Cohen (2014). Zen and the Art of Storytelling. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (6):597-608.
    This paper explores the contribution of Zen storytelling to moral education. First, an understanding of Zen practice, what it is and how it is achieved, is established. Second, the connection between Zen practice and ethics is shown in terms of the former’s ability to cultivate moral emotions and actions. It is shown that Zen practice works at the roots of consciousness where, according to the fundamental tenets of Buddhism, the possibility of human goodness, known as bodhicitta , lies. Third, (...)
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    Susanne Mrozik (2004). Cooking Living Beings: The Transformative Effects of Encounters with Bodhisattva Bodies. Journal of Religious Ethics 32 (1):175 - 194.
    Bodies play important and diverse roles in Buddhist ethics. Drawing upon an Indian Mahāyāna Buddhist compendium of bodhisattva practice, this paper explores the role bodhisattva bodies play in the ethical development of other living beings. Bodhisattvas adopt certain disciplinary practices in order to produce bodies whose very sight, sound, touch, and even taste transform living beings in physical and moral ways. The compendium uses a common South Asian and Buddhist metaphor to describe a bodhisattva's physical and moral impact on others. (...)
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    Norman Harry Rothschild (2006). Fazang (Fa-Tsang). Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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    Juan Arnau (2007). Lenguaje y silencio en las tradiciones budistas. 'Ilu. Revista de Ciencias de Las Religiones 14:85-105.
    The article analyzes the figure of Indian philosopher Vasubandhu (ca. S. IV), one of the most important representative of the vijñānavāda school of mahāyāna Buddhism. After a brief account on the legendary biography of Vasubandhu and other members of his school, the article focuses on the understanding of two of his seminal works: Trimśikā and Trisvabhāvakārikā through the concepts of vijñāna (showing the different meanings of this widely used concept in Buddhist thought), ālayavijñāna (store consciousness), vāsanā (mental trace), parikalpa (imagination) (...)
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    Luke Perera (2015). Bodhicitta and Charity: A Comparison. Buddhist-Christian Studies 35 (1):121-146.
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  7. The Cowherds (2015). Moonpaths: Ethics and Emptiness. Oxford University Press Usa.
    The Mahayana tradition in Buddhist philosophy is defined by its ethical orientation--the adoption of bodhicitta, the aspiration to attain awakening for the benefit of all sentient beings. And indeed, this tradition is known for its literature on ethics, which reflect the Madhyamaka tradition of philosophy, and emphasizes both the imperative to cultivate an attitude of universal care grounded in the realization of emptiness, impermanence, independence, and the absence of any self in persons or other phenomena.This position is morally very (...)
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  8. The Cowherds (2015). Moonpaths: Ethics and Emptiness. Oxford University Press Usa.
    The Mahayana tradition in Buddhist philosophy is defined by its ethical orientation--the adoption of bodhicitta, the aspiration to attain awakening for the benefit of all sentient beings. And indeed, this tradition is known for its literature on ethics, which reflect the Madhyamaka tradition of philosophy, and emphasizes both the imperative to cultivate an attitude of universal care grounded in the realization of emptiness, impermanence, independence, and the absence of any self in persons or other phenomena.This position is morally very (...)
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