Search results for 'Body, Human (Philosophy History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  9
    Michel Feher, Ramona Naddaff & Nadia Tazi (1991). Fragments for a History of the Human Body. Philosophy East and West 41 (2):276-278.
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  2.  42
    Lisa Yun Lee (2004). Dialectics of the Body: Corporeality in the Philosophy of T.W. Adorno. Routledge.
    The aim of this book is to understand what Deleuze and Guattari mean by "art." Stephen Zepke argues that art, in their account, is an ontological term and an ontological practice that results in a new understanding of aesthetics. For Deleuze and Guattari understanding what art "is" means understanding how it works, what it does, how it "becomes," and finally, how it lives. This book illuminates these philosophers' discussion of ontology from the viewpoint of art-and vice versa-in a thorough questioning (...)
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  3.  26
    Martyn Evans (2001). The 'Medical Body' as Philosophy's Arena. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (1):17-32.
    Medicine, as Byron Good argues, reconstitutes thehuman body of our daily experience as a medical body,unfamiliar outside medicine. This reconstitution can be seen intwo ways: as a salutary reminder of the extent to which thereality even of the human body is constructed; and as anarena for what Stephen Toulmin distinguishes as theintersection of natural science and history, in which many ofphilosophy''s traditional questionsare given concrete and urgent form.This paper begins by examining a number of dualities between themedical (...)
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  4. Stuart F. Spicker (1970). The Philosophy of the Body. Chicago,Quadrangle Books.
    Of the nature and origin of the mind, by B. de Spinoza.--Spinoza and the theory of organism, by H. Jonas.--Man a machine, and The natural history of the soul, by J. O. de la Mettrie.--On the first ground of the distinction of regions in space, and What is orientation in thinking? by I. Kant.--Soul and body, by J. Dewey.--The philosophical concept of a human body, by D. C. Long.--Are persons bodies? By B. A. O. Williams.--Lived body, environment, and (...)
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  5. David Kleinberg-Levin (1990). The Discursive Formation of the Human Body in the History of Medicine. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 15 (5):515-537.
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  6.  6
    Robert L. Martensen (2004). The Brain Takes Shape: An Early History. Oxford University Press.
    This fine book tells an important story of how long-standing notions about the body as dominated by spirit-like humors were transformed into scientific descriptions of its solid tissues. Vesalius, Harvey, Descartes, Willis, and Locke all played roles in this transformation, as the cerebral hemispheres and cranial nerves began to take precedence over the role of spirit, passion, and the heart in human thought and behavior. Non of this occurred in a social vacuum, and the book describes the historical context (...)
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  7.  34
    Christian Emden (2005). Nietzsche on Language, Consciousness, and the Body. University of Illinois Press.
    The irreducibility of language : the history of rhetoric in the age of typewriters -- The failures of empiricism : language, science, and the philosophical tradition -- What is a trope? : the discourse of metaphor and the language of the body -- The nervous systems of modern consciousness : metaphor, physiology, and mind -- Interpretation and life : outlines of an anthropology of knowledge.
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  8.  45
    Shigenori Nagatomo (1992). Attunement Through the Body. State University of New York Press.
    CHAPTER 1 Ichikawa' s View of the Body INTRODUCTION In 1975, Ichikawa Hiroshi published a remarkable book on the concept of the body entitled, ...
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  9. Bruce W. Holsinger (2001). Music, Body, and Desire in Medieval Culture: Hildegard of Bingen to Chaucer. Stanford University Press.
    Ranging chronologically from the twelfth to the fifteenth century and thematically from Latin to vernacular literary modes, this book challenges standard assumptions about the musical cultures and philosophies of the European Middle Ages. Engaging a wide range of premodern texts and contexts, from the musicality of sodomy in twelfth-century polyphony to Chaucer's representation of pedagogical violence in the Prioress's Tale, from early Christian writings on the music of the body to the plainchant and poetry of Hildegard of Bingen, the author (...)
     
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  10.  23
    Marjorie O'Rourke Boyle (1998). Senses of Touch: Human Dignity and Deformity From Michelangelo to Calvin. Brill.
    From posture to piety, from manicure to magic, the book discovers touch in a critical period of its historical development, in anatomy and society.
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  11.  26
    Harvie Ferguson (2000). Modernity and Subjectivity: Body, Soul, Spirit. University Press of Virginia.
    Has not such a promiscuous, ill-defined concept come to obscure and confuse rather than clarify a genuine understanding of our experience?Harvie Ferguson ...
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  12. Adam J. Buben (2011). The Existential Compromise in the History of the Philosophy of Death. Dissertation, Proquest
    I begin by offering an account of two key strains in the history of philosophical dealings with death. Both strains initially seek to diminish fear of death by appealing to the idea that death is simply the separation of the soul from the body. According to the Platonic strain, death should not be feared since the soul will have a prolonged existence free from the bodily prison after death. With several dramatic modifications, this is the strain that is taken (...)
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  13. Suzannah Biernoff (2002). Sight and Embodiment in the Middle Ages. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Sight and Embodiment in the Middle Ages breaks new ground by bringing postmodern writings on vision and embodiment into dialogue with medieval texts and images: an interdisciplinary strategy that illuminates and complicates both cultures. This is an invaluable reference work for anyone interested in the history and theory of visuality, and it is essential reading or scholars of art, science, or spirituality in the medieval period.
     
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  14.  7
    Scott R. Hemmenway (1994). Pedagogy in the Myth of Plato's "Statesman:" Body and Soul in Relation to Philosophy and Politics. History of Philosophy Quarterly 11 (3):253 - 268.
    Because the young Socrates has presuppositions typical of a mathematician about the independence of the mind from the body, he has to be led to a fuller appreciation of the human soul, i.e., embodied intelligence, in order to understand statesmanship. The Eleatic Stranger thus tells a myth about an age where men age backwards, are born out of the earth, and are cared for by shepherd/gods. This affords the opportunity to think quite radically about how the body shapes the (...)
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  15. Andreas Bähr (ed.) (2005). Grenzen der Aufklärung: Körperkonstruktionen Und Die Tötung des Körpers Im Übergang Zur Moderne. Wehrhahn.
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  16.  1
    D. M. Levin & G. F. Solomon (1990). The Discursive Formation of the Body in the History of Medicine. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 15 (5):515-537.
    The principal argument of the present paper is that the human body is as much a reflective formation of multiple discourses as it is an effect of natural and environmental processes. This paper examines the implications of this argument, and suggests that recognizing the body in this light can be illuminating, not only for our conception of the body, but also for our understanding of medicine. Since medicine is itself a discursive formation, a science with both a history, (...)
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  17.  11
    George F. Solomon (1990). The Discursive Formation of the Body in the History of Medicine. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 15 (5):515-537.
    The principal argument of the present paper is that the human body is as much a reflective formation of multiple discourses as it is an effect of natural and environmental processes. This paper examines the implications of this argument, and suggests that recognizing the body in this light can be illuminating, not only for our conception of the body, but also for our understanding of medicine. Since medicine is itself a discursive formation, a science with both a history, (...)
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  18.  19
    Ted Honderich (ed.) (2005). The Oxford Companion to Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Offering clear and reliable guidance to the ideas of philosophers from antiquity to the present day and to the major philosophical systems around the globe, he Oxford Companion to Philosophy is the definitive philosophical reference work for readers at all levels. For ten years the original volume has served as a stimulating introduction for general readers and as an indispensable guide for students and scholars. A distinguished international assembly of 249 philosophers contributed almost 2,000 entries, and many of these have (...)
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  19. Barbara Stiegler (2005). Nietzsche Et la Critique de la Chair: Dionysos, Ariane, le Christ. Presses Universitaires de France.
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  20. Géraldine Caps (2010). Les Médecins Cartésiens: Héritage Et Diffusion de la Représentation Mécaniste du Corps Humain (1646-1696). G. Olms.
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  21. Shawn Loht (forthcoming). On the Concept of the Human Body in Heraclitus. Proceedings of the Southeast Philosophy Congress.
    Explores how the fragments of Heraclitus might yield an implicit understanding of the human body in distinction to the soul. In the history of scholarship on Heraclitus, soul is a much better understood concept, whereas it is normally assumed that Heraclitus, along with other figures of early Greek thought, shows only the most limited comprehension of the human being in terms of bodily form or substance. In this work I sketch some different ways in which Heraclitus’ accounts (...)
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  22.  15
    Adriana Cavarero (2005). For More Than One Voice: Toward a Philosophy of Vocal Expression. Stanford University Press.
    The human voice does not deceive. The one who is speaking is inevitably revealed by the singular sound of her voice, no matter “what” she says. We take this fact for granted—for example, every time someone asks, over the telephone, “Who is speaking?” and receives as a reply the familiar utterance, “It’s me.” Starting from the given uniqueness of every voice, Cavarero rereads the history of philosophy through its peculiar evasion of this embodied uniqueness. She shows how this (...)
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  23.  3
    Kienhow Goh (2015). Fichte on the Human Body as an Instrument of Perception. History of Philosophy Quarterly 32 (1):37-56.
    This paper considers what Fichte's conception of the human body as an instrument of perception entails for his radical principle of the primacy of practice. According to Fichte, perception is a function of what he calls the "articulation" of the human body, as opposed to its "organization." I first provide an interpretation of his theory of the human-bodily articulation by arguing that he construes it as a product of culture as well as nature. On this basis, I (...)
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  24.  34
    Ludwig Siep (2003). Normative Aspects of the Human Body. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 28 (2):171 – 185.
    In cultural history the human body has been the object of a great variety of opposing valuations, ranging from "imago dei" to "the devil's tool". At present, the body is commonly regarded as a mere means to fulfill the wishes of its "owner". According to these wishes it can be technically improved in an unlimited way. Against this view the text argues for a conception of the human body as a valuable "common heritage". The "normal" human (...)
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  25.  3
    Jacek Bielas & Rafał Abramciów (2009). Dimensions of Corporeality. A Metatheoretical Analysis of Anthropologists 'Concern with the Human Body'. Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 14 (1).
    Since the very dawn of its history, modern philosophical anthropology has been addressing the issue of the human body. As a result of those efforts, Descartes, de Biran, Husserl, Sartre, Marcel, Merleau-Ponty and others have brought forward a variety of conceptions concerning various aspects of human corporeality. Anthropological explorations concerning the question of the human body, appear in a particularly interesting way, when they are considered in the context of those points of view which, in an (...)
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  26.  20
    M. Tooley (2013). Philosophy, Critical Thinking and 'After-Birth Abortion: Why Should the Baby Live?'. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):266-272.
    Confronted with an article defending conclusions that many people judge problematic, philosophers are interested, first of all, in clarifying exactly what arguments are being offered for the views in question, and then, second, in carefully and dispassionately examining those arguments, to determine whether or not they are sound. As a philosopher, then, that is how I would naturally approach the article ‘After-birth abortion: why should the baby live?’, by Alberto Giubilini and Francesca Minerva. Very few philosophical publications, however, have evoked (...)
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  27.  63
    Gary Hatfield (2007). The Passions of the Soul and Descartes's Machine Psychology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (1):1-35.
    Descartes developed an elaborate theory of animal physiology that he used to explain functionally organized, situationally adapted behavior in both human and nonhuman animals. Although he restricted true mentality to the human soul, I argue that he developed a purely mechanistic (or material) ‘psychology’ of sensory, motor, and low-level cognitive functions. In effect, he sought to mechanize the offices of the Aristotelian sensitive soul. He described the basic mechanisms in the Treatise on man, which he summarized in the (...)
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  28.  29
    Shadi Bartsch (2006). The Mirror of the Self: Sexuality, Self-Knowledge, and the Gaze in the Early Roman Empire. University of Chicago Press.
    People in the ancient world thought of vision as both an ethical tool and a tactile sense, akin to touch. Gazing upon someone—or oneself—was treated as a path to philosophical self-knowledge, but the question of tactility introduced an erotic element as well. In The Mirror of the Self , Shadi Bartsch asserts that these links among vision, sexuality, and self-knowledge are key to the classical understanding of the self. Weaving together literary theory, philosophy, and social history, Bartsch traces this (...)
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  29.  8
    Jeanine Grenberg (2009). Review: Louden, Robert B., and Zöller, Günter (Eds.), Anthropology, History, and Education. Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (3):pp. 474-475.
    We are told in the introduction to this volume that what holds together such an apparently diverse collection of essays under a single rubric is the theme of "human nature." And this is fair enough: themes ranging from Kant's reflections on physiology, to his investigation of the vexed notion of what it is that constitutes a race, to his reflections on philosophy of history, to his lectures on pedagogy all fit reasonably enough under the rubric of "human (...)
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  30.  91
    David Owen (1992). Reviews : Eric Blondel (Trans. Seán Hand), Nietzsche: The Body and Culture: Philosophy as a Philological Genealogy. London: The Athlone Press, 1991. £40.00, 353 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 5 (1):103-106.
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  31.  10
    D. G. Brown (1968). Action. TorontoUniversity Press.
    An essay in descriptive metaphysics, this book offers a sketch of the concept of action embodied in pretheoretical, folk ways of speaking. It focuses on the points of view of the agent and spectator in the kind of action in which the question of what to do can arise for the agent. It explores the relations among such action, inanimate action, and the inanimate action of parts of the body on external objects, finding in them analogous roles for the notion (...)
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  32.  7
    Olga Gomilko (2008). The Body in Thinking. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 20:69-75.
    The paper presents the main ideas of systematic research of the phenomenon of the human body as an essential characteristic of human being and the fundamental philosophical concept. It allows one to scrutinize the concept of the human body as a necessary research tool in the humanities. The human body is analyzed in the process of its conceptualization in the history of philosophy, in relation to which its logic and main phases are defined. The paradigms (...)
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  33.  13
    Bert Gordijn & Wim Dekkers (2005). Autonomy, Integrity and the Human Body. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (2):145-146.
  34.  13
    Judith Lee Kissell (1998). Getting Beyond Classical Liberalism: The Human Body and the Property Paradigm. Medicine, Healthcare and Philosophy 1 (3):279-281.
  35.  2
    Henk A. M. J. ten Have (1998). Health Care and The Human Body. Medicine, Healthcare and Philosophy 1 (2):103-105.
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  36. Jerry Day (2003). Voegelin, Schelling, and the Philosophy of Historical Existence. University of Missouri.
    In this important new work, Jerry Day brings to light the need for an extensive reinterpretation of the mature philosophy of Eric Voegelin, based on Voegelin’s published and unpublished appreciation for nineteenth-century German philosopher F. W. J. Schelling. Schelling, whom Day maintains was one of the most important guides to Voegelin’s mature philosophy of consciousness and historiography, has been described as the father of several disparate movements and schools of continental philosophy—chief among them being “Hegelian” idealism and existentialism. This characterization (...)
     
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  37.  93
    John Sutton (2013). Soul and Body. In Peter Anstey (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century. Oxford University Press 285-307.
    Ideas about soul and body – about thinking or remembering, mind and life, brain and self – remain both diverse and controversial in our neurocentric age. The history of these ideas is significant both in its own right and to aid our understanding of the complex sources and nature of our concepts of mind, cognition, and psychology, which are all terms with puzzling, difficult histories. These topics are not the domain of specialists alone, and studies of emotion, perception, or (...)
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  38.  9
    Daniel C. Dennett (2014). Content and Consciousness. Routledge.
    _Content and Consciousness_ is an original and ground-breaking attempt to elucidate a problem integral to the history of Western philosophical thought: the relationship of the mind and body. In this formative work, Dennett sought to develop a theory of the human mind and consciousness based on new and challenging advances in the field that came to be known as cognitive science. This important and illuminating work is widely-regarded as the book from which all of Dennett’s future ideas developed. (...)
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  39.  54
    Grant Duncan (2000). Mind-Body Dualism and the Biopsychosocial Model of Pain: What Did Descartes Really Say? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (4):485 – 513.
    In the last two decades there have been many critics of western biomedicine's poor integration of social and psychological factors in questions of human health. Such critiques frequently begin with a rejection of Descartes' mind-body dualism, viewing this as the decisive philosophical moment, radically separating the two realms in both theory and practice. It is argued here, however, that many such readings of Descartes have been selective and misleading. Contrary to the assumptions of many recent authors, Descartes' dualism does (...)
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  40.  71
    Severin Schroeder (ed.) (2001). Wittgenstein and Contemporary Philosophy of Mind. Palgrave.
    Wittgenstein and Contemporary Philosophy of Mind aims to reassess the work of Wittgenstein in terms of its importance to contemporary debates surrounding the philosophy of mind.The first part of this study examines Wittgenstein in the context of current views on the human mind in relation to the body and behavior. The arguments confront the views of Quine and Dennett, as well as functionalism, eliminative materialism, and the current debate about consciousness. The essays that make (...)
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  41.  58
    Robert Pasnau (2002). Thomas Aquinas on Human Nature: A Philosophical Study of Summa Theologiae 1a, 75-89. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a major new study of Thomas Aquinas, the most influential philosopher of the Middle Ages. The book offers a clear and accessible guide to the central project of Aquinas' philosophy: the understanding of human nature. Robert Pasnau sets the philosophy in the context of ancient and modern thought, and argues for some groundbreaking proposals for understanding some of the most difficult areas of Aquinas' thought: the relationship of soul to body, the workings of sense and intellect, the (...)
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  42.  25
    Frederick A. Olafson (1995). What is a Human Being?: A Heideggerian View. Cambridge University Press.
    This broad, ambitious study is about human nature, but human nature treated in a way quite different from the scientific account that influences so much of contemporary philosophy. Drawing on certain basic ideas of Heidegger the author presents an alternative to the debate waged between dualists and materialists in the philosophy of mind that involves reconceiving the way we usually think about 'mental' life. Olafson argues that familiar contrasts between the 'physical' and the 'psychological' break down under closer (...)
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  43.  8
    Natania Meeker (2006). Voluptuous Philosophy: Literary Materialism in the French Enlightenment. Fordham University Press.
    Eighteenth-century France witnessed the rise of matter itself—in forms ranging from atoms to anatomies—as a privileged object of study. Voluptuous Philosophy redefines what is at stake in the emergence of an enlightened secular materialism by showing how questions of figure—how should a body be represented? What should the effects of this representation be on readers?—are tellingly and consistently located at the very heart of 18th-century debates about the nature of material substance. French materialisms of the Enlightenment are crucially invested not (...)
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  44. Charles F. Peterson (2016). Introductions and Histories: How, When, and Where of Race in Philosophy. Philosophy Compass 11 (2):75-80.
    Introductions and Histories: How, When, and Where of Race in Philosophy Africana Philosophy has successfully argued itself to be an important area of philosophical discourse. Fundamental to this effort is Africana Philosophy's work to bring race, race thinking, and racism to the fore of philosophical examination. In the wake of Africana Philosophy's influence, discussions of race, race thinking, and racism are becoming central to regular philosophical discourse. The production of introductory works on race and philosophy and works examining the place (...)
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  45. John Dewey, Larry A. Hickman & Phillip Deen (2012). Unmodern Philosophy and Modern Philosophy. Southern Illinois University Press.
    In 1947 America’s premier philosopher, educator, and public intellectual John Dewey purportedly lost his last manuscript on modern philosophy in the back of a taxicab. Now, sixty-five years later, Dewey’s fresh and unpretentious take on the history and theory of knowledge is finally available. Editor Phillip Deen has taken on the task of editing Dewey’s unfinished work, carefully compiling the fragments and multiple drafts of each chapter that he discovered in the folders of the Dewey Papers at the Special (...)
     
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  46.  30
    Vincent W. J. Van Gerven Oei (2012). Cumposition: Theses on Philosophy's Etymology. Continent 2 (1).
    continent. 2.1 (2012): 44–55. Philosophers are sperm, poetry erupts sperm and dribbles, philosopher recodes term, to terminate, —A. Staley Groves 1 There is, in the relation of human languages to that of things, something that can be approximately described as “overnaming”—the deepest linguistic reason for all melancholy and (from the point of view of the thing) for all deliberate muteness. Overnaming as the linguistic being of melancholy points to another curious relation of language: the overprecision that obtains in the (...)
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  47. Huw Price, Hawking's History of Time: A Plea for the Missing Page.
    One of the outstanding achievements of recent cosmology has been to offer some prospect of a unified explanation of temporal asymmetry. The explanation is in two main parts, and runs something like this. First, the various asymmetries we observe are all thermodynamic in origin – all products of the fact that we live in an epoch in which the universe is far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Second, this thermodynamic disequilibrium is associated with the condition of the universe very soon after the (...)
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  48.  2
    J. Latimer & M. Miele (2013). Naturecultures? Science, Affect and the Non-Human. Theory, Culture and Society 30 (7-8):5-31.
    Rather than focus on effects, the isolatable and measureable outcomes of events and interventions, the papers assembled here offer different perspectives on the affective dimension of the meaning and politics of human/non-human relations. The authors begin by drawing attention to the constructed discontinuity between humans and non-humans, and to the kinds of knowledge and socialities that this discontinuity sustains, including those underpinned by nature-culture, subject-object, body-mind, individual-society polarities. The articles presented track human/non-human relations through different domains, (...)
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  49.  30
    Joachim Schummer, The Philosophy of Chemistry.
    It would seem that philosophy of chemistry emerged only recently. Since the early 1990s philosophers and chemists began to meet in many different countries to discuss philosophical issues of chemistry – at first in isolated national groups but soon cultivating international exchange through regular meetings and the publications of two journals (Hyle and Foundations of Chemistry) devoted to the philosophy of chemistry. While the social formation is indeed a recent phenomenon that is still in progress, the philosophical topics have a (...)
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  50.  16
    James Aho & Kevin Aho (2008). Body Matters: A Phenomenology of Sickness, Disease, and Illness. Lexington Books.
    Written in a jargon-free way, Body Matters provides a clear and accessible phenomenological critique of core assumptions in mainstream biomedicine and explores ways in which health and illness are experienced and interpreted differently in various socio-historical situations. By drawing on the disciplines of literature, cultural anthropology, sociology, medical history, and philosophy, the authors attempt to dismantle common presuppositions we have about human afflictions and examine how the methods of phenomenology open up new ways to interpret the body and (...)
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