Search results for 'Body, Human Social aspects' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  44
    Nick Crossley (2001). The Social Body: Habit, Identity and Desire. Sage.
    This book explores both the embodied nature of social life and the social nature of human bodily life. It provides an accessible review of the contemporary social science debates on the body, and develops a coherent new perspective. Nick Crossley critically reviews the literature on mind and body, and also on the body and society. He draws on theoretical insights from the work of Gilbert Ryle, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, George Herbert Mead and Pierre Bourdieu, and shows how (...)
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  2.  34
    Ludwig Siep (2003). Normative Aspects of the Human Body. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 28 (2):171 – 185.
    In cultural history the human body has been the object of a great variety of opposing valuations, ranging from "imago dei" to "the devil's tool". At present, the body is commonly regarded as a mere means to fulfill the wishes of its "owner". According to these wishes it can be technically improved in an unlimited way. Against this view the text argues for a conception of the human body as a valuable "common heritage". The "normal" human body (...)
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  3. Iris Marion Young (2005). On Female Body Experience: "Throwing Like a Girl" and Other Essays. Oxford University Press.
    Written over a span of more than two decades, the essays by Iris Marion Young collected in this volume describe diverse aspects of women's lived body experience in modern Western societies. Drawing on the ideas of several twentieth century continental philosophers--including Simone de Beauvoir, Martin Heidegger, Luce Irigaray, Julia Kristeva, and Maurice Merleau-Ponty--Young constructs rigorous analytic categories for interpreting embodied subjectivity. The essays combine theoretical description of experience with normative evaluation of the unjust constraints on their freedom and opportunity (...)
     
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  4.  12
    Jean Bethke Elshtain & J. Timothy Cloyd (eds.) (1995). Politics and the Human Body: Assault on Dignity. Vanderbilt University Press.
    Who or what determines the right to die? Do advancing reproductive technologies change reproductive rights? What forces influence cultural standards of beauty? How do discipline, punishment, and torture reflect our attitudes about the human body? In this challenging new book, Jean Bethke Elshtain, a nationally recognized scholar in political science and philosophy, and J. Timothy Cloyd, a strong new voice in social and political science, have assembled a collection of thought-provoking essays on these issues written by some of (...)
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  5. E. A. Grosz (1994). Volatile Bodies: Toward a Corporeal Feminism. Allen & Unwin.
    Introduction and acknowledgments Part I. Introduction 1 Refiguring bodies Part II The inside out 2 Psychoanalysis and physical topographies 3 Body images: ...
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  6. Moira Gatens (1996). Imaginary Bodies: Ethics, Power, and Corporeality. Routledge.
    Imaginary Bodies is a collection of essays that offer a sustained challenge to traditional philosophical notions of the body, sex and gender. Moira Gatens explores alternative positions to dualism by exploring psychoanalytic, Foucaultian and Spinozist notions of embodiment. The book traces a largely neglected geneaology of philosophers from Spinoza, Nietzsche, Freud, Foucault and Deleuze and sets this tradition against that of the Enlightenment. What emerges are new ways of thinking those aspects of life which Gatens calls "imaginary." Confining herself (...)
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  7. Edward Tenner (2003). Our Own Devices: The Past and Future of Body Technology. Alfred A. Knopf.
    Machine generated contents note: Preface ix -- Chapter One: Technology, Technique, and the Body 3 --Chapter Two: The First Technology: Bottle-Feeding 30 --Chapter Three: Slow Motion: Zori 51 --Chapter Four: Double Time: Athletic Shoes 75 --Chapter Five: Sitting Up Straight: Posture Chairs 104 --Chapter Six: Laid Back: Reclining Chairs 134 --Chapter Seven: Mechanical Arts: Musical Keyboards 161 --Chapter Eight: Letter Perfect?: Text Keyboards 187 --Chapter Nine: Second Sight: Eyeglasses 213 --Chapter Ten: Hardheaded Logic: Helmets 238 --Epilogue: Thumbs Up 263 -- (...)
     
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  8.  13
    David Michael Kleinberg-Levin (1985). The Body's Recollection of Being: Phenomenological Psychology and the Deconstruction of Nihilism. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
    Expands our understanding of the human potential of spiritual self-realization by interpreting it as the developing of a bodily-felt awareness informing our ...
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  9. Shigehisa Kuriyama (1999). The Expressiveness of the Body and the Divergence of Greek and Chinese Medicine. Zone Books.
     
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  10. Lynda I. A. Birke (2000). Feminism and the Biological Body. Rutgers University Press.
  11. Shirley Castelnuovo (1998). Feminism and the Female Body: Liberating the Amazon Within. L. Rienner Publishers.
  12. Insa Härtel & Sigrid Schade (eds.) (2002). Body and Representation. Leske + Budrich.
  13. Catherine Kevin (ed.) (2009). Feminism and the Body: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Cambridge Scholars.
  14.  37
    Margrit Shildrick (1997). Leaky Bodies and Boundaries: Feminism, Postmodernism and (Bio)Ethics. Routledge.
    Drawing on postmodernist analyses, Leaky Bodies and Boundaries presents a feminist investigation into the marginalization of women within western discourse that denies both female moral agency and bodylines. With reference to contemporary and historical issues in biomedicine, the book argues that the boundaries of both the subject and the body are no longer secure. The aim is both to valorize women and to suggest that "leakiness" may be the very ground for a postmodern feminist ethic. The contribution made by Margrit (...)
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  15. E. A. Grosz (1995). Space, Time, and Perversion: Essays on the Politics of Bodies. Routledge.
    Marking a ground-breaking moment in the debate surrounding bodies and "body politics," Elizabeth Grosz's Space, Time and Perversion contends that only by resituating and rethinking the body will feminism and cultural analysis effect and unsettle the knowledges, disciplines and institutions which have controlled, regulated and managed the body both ideologically and materially. Exploring the fields of architecture, philosophy, and--in a controversial way--queer theory, Grosz shows how these fields have conceptually stripped bodies of their specificity, their corporeality, and the vestigal traces (...)
     
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  16.  12
    Russell Keat (1986). The Human Body in Social Theory: Reich, Foucault and the Repressive Hypothesis. Radical Philosophy 42 (1986):275-303.
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  17. Myra J. Hird (2004). Sex, Gender, and Science. Palgrave Macmillan.
    In Sex, Gender and Science , Myra Hird outlines the social study of science and nature, specifically in relation to sex, sex differences, and sexuality. She examines how Western understandings of sex are based less upon understanding material sex differences than on a discourse that emphasizes sex dichotomy over sex diversity and argues for a feminist engagement with scientific debate that embraces the diversity and complexity of nature.
     
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  18.  31
    Kathryn Ehrich, Clare Williams & Bobbie Farsides (2010). Consenting Futures: Professional Views on Social, Clinical and Ethical Aspects of Information Feedback to Embryo Donors in Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Clinical Ethics 5 (2):77-85.
    This paper reports from an ongoing multidisciplinary, ethnographic study that is exploring the views, values and practices (the ethical frameworks) drawn on by professional staff in assisted conception units and stem cell laboratories in relation to embryo donation for research purposes, particularly human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research, in the UK. We focus here on the connection between possible incidental findings and the circumstances in which embryos are donated for hESC research, and report some of the uncertainties and dilemmas (...)
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  19.  4
    European Group on Ethics in Science & New Technologies (2005). Ethical Aspects of ICT Implants in the Human Body. Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 10 (1).
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  20.  4
    Timothy Harvie (2015). The Social Body: Thomas Aquinas on Economics and Human Embodiment. Heythrop Journal 56 (3):388-398.
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  21.  6
    Christian Munthe (2003). The Use of Human Biobanks. Ethical, Social, Economical, and Legal Aspects: Edited by M G Hansson. Uppsala University, 2001, Free, Pp 93. ISBN 91-506-1472-X. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (2):123-a-123.
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  22. Mercedes Arriaga Flórez (ed.) (2006). Sin Carne: Representaciones y Simulacros Del Cuerpo Femenino: Tecnología, Comunicación y Poder. Arcibel Editores.
  23. Jesús Ballesteros & Encarna Fernández (eds.) (2007). Biotecnología y Posthumanismo. Editorial Aranzadi.
    La obra recoge, desde una perspectiva interdisciplinar, las aportaciones de un grupo de investigadores españoles e italianos que han trabajado conjuntamente durante varios años en distintas cuestiones en torno a las posibilidades y riesgos de los avances biotecnológicos y su incidencia en el campo de los derechos humanos. Los estudios y debates se han realizado en el marco del programa de doctorado internacional sobre "Derechos humanos: Problemas actuales" encabezado por las Universidades de Valencia y Palermo. El Profesor Jesús Ballesteros, Catedrático (...)
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  24. Maria Bernardete Ramos Flores (2007). Tecnologia E Estética Do Racismo: Ciência E Arte Na Política da Beleza. Argos Editora Universitária.
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  25. Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen, Mads Rosendahl Thomsen & Jacob Wamberg (eds.) (2012). The Posthuman Condition: Ethics, Aesthetics and Politics of Biotechnological Challenges. Aarhus University Press ;.
     
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  26.  5
    Francisco Ortega (2010). El Cuerpo Incierto: Corporeidad, Tecnologías Médicas y Cultura Contemporánea. Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas.
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  27. Marek S. Szczepański (2010). Potyczki Psyche I Soma: Elementy Socjologii Ciała I Aktywności Fizycznej. Wydawn. Uniwersytetu Opolskiego.
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  28. Helga Treichl (2005). Technik, Medien Und Gender: Zum "Paradigmenwechsel" des Körpers. Turia + Kant.
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  29.  5
    Bogdan Stancu, Georgel Rednic, Nicolae Ovidiu Grad, Ion Aurel Mironiuc & Claudia Diana Gherman (2016). Medical, Social and Christian Aspects in Patients with Major Lower Limb Amputations. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 15 (43):82-101.
    Lower limb major amputations are both life-saving procedures and life-changing events. Individual responses to limb loss are varied and complex, some individuals experience functional, psychological and social dysfunction, many others adjust and function well. Some patients refuse amputation for religious and/or cultural reasons. One of the greatest difficulties for a person undergoing amputation surgery is overcoming the psychological stigma that society associates with the loss of a limb. Persons who have undergone amputations are often viewed as incomplete individuals. The (...)
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  30.  22
    Stefanie Rembold (2014). Human Enhancement’? It’s All About ‘Body Modification’! Why We Should Replace the Term ‘Human Enhancement’ with ‘Body Modification’. NanoEthics 8 (3):307-315.
    The current use of the term ‘Human Enhancement’ implies that it is a modern, new phenomenon in which, for the first time in history, humans are able to break through their god or nature-given bodily limits thanks to the application of new technologies. The debate about the legitimation of ‘HE’, the selection of methods permitted, and the scope and purpose of these modern enhancement technologies has been dominated by ethical considerations, and has highlighted problems with the definition of the (...)
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  31.  68
    Mark Johnson (2007). The Meaning of the Body: Aesthetics of Human Understanding. University of Chicago Press.
    The belief that the mind and the body are separate and that the mind is the source of all meaning has been a part of Western culture for centuries. Both philosophers and scientists have questioned this dualism, but their efforts have rarely converged. Many philosophers continue to rely on disembodied models of human thought, while scientists tend to reduce the complex process of thinking to a merely physical phenomenon. In The Meaning of the Body , Mark Johnson (...)
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  32.  12
    Costas Douzinas & C. A. Gearty (eds.) (2014). The Meanings of Rights: The Philosophy and Social Theory of Human Rights. Cambridge University Press.
    Questioning some of the repetitive and narrow theoretical writings on rights, a group of leading intellectuals examine human rights from philosophical, theological, historical, literary and political perspectives.
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  33. David N. Weisstub (ed.) (1998). Research on Human Subjects: Ethics, Law, and Social Policy. Pergamon.
    There have been serious controversies in the latter part of the 20th century about the roles and functions of scientific and medical research. In whose interests are medical and biomedical experiments conducted and what are the ethical implications of experimentation on subjects unable to give competent consent? From the decades following the Second World War and calls for the global banning of medical research to the cautious return to the notion that in controlled circumstances, medical research on human subjects (...)
     
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  34.  17
    Petya Puncheva-Michelotti, Marco Michelotti & Peter Gahan (2010). The Relationship Between Individuals' Recognition of Human Rights and Responses to Socially Responsible Companies: Evidence From Russia and Bulgaria. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 93 (4):583 - 605.
    An emerging body of literature has highlighted a gap in our understanding of the extent to which the salience attached to human rights is likely to influence the extent to which an individual takes account of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in decision making. The primary aim of this study is to begin to address this gap by understanding how individuals attribute different emphasis on specific aspects of human rights when making decisions to purchase, work, invest or (...)
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  35. D. A. Ampofo (1994). The Health Issues of Human Reprodution [Sic] of Our Time: Philosophical Perspectives of Health and Social Problems of Procreation. Ghana Academy of Arts and Sciences.
     
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  36.  38
    Richard Shusterman (2008). Body Consciousness: A Philosophy of Mindfulness and Somaesthetics. Cambridge University Press.
    Contemporary culture increasingly suffers from problems of attention, over-stimulation, and stress, and a variety of personal and social discontents generated by deceptive body images. This book argues that improved body consciousness can relieve these problems and enhance one’s knowledge, performance, and pleasure. The body is our basic medium of perception and action, but focused attention to its feelings and movements has long been criticized as a damaging distraction that also ethically corrupts through self-absorption. In Body Consciousness, Richard Shusterman refutes (...)
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  37.  42
    Paula M. Cooey (1994). Religious Imagination and the Body: A Feminist Analysis. Oxford University Press.
    In recent years feminist scholarship has increasingly focused on the importance of the body and its representations in virtually every social, cultural, and intellectual context. Many have argued that because women are more closely identified with their bodies, they have access to privileged and different kinds of knowledge than men. In this landmark new book, Paula Cooey offers a different perspective on the significance of the body in the context of religious life and practice. Building on the pathbreaking work (...)
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  38.  23
    Felix Martin (2011). Human Development and the Pursuit of the Common Good: Social Psychology or Aristotelian Virtue Ethics? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 100 (S1):89-98.
    The encyclical proclaims the centrality of human development, which includes acting with gratuitousness and solidarity in pursuing the common good. This paper considers first whether such relationships of gratuitousness and solidarity can be analysed through the prism of traditional theories of social psychology, which are highly influential in current management research, and concludes that certain aspects of those theories may offer useful tools for analysis at the practical level. This is contrasted with the analysis of such relationships (...)
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  39. Theodore R. Schatzki (1996). Social Practices: A Wittgensteinian Approach to Human Activity and the Social. Cambridge University Press.
    This book addresses key topics in social theory such as the basic structures of social life, the character of human activity, and the nature of individuality. Drawing on the work of Wittgenstein, the author develops an account of social existence that argues that social practices are the fundamental phenomenon in social life. This approach offers new insight into the social formation of individuals, surpassing and critiquing the existing practice theories of Bourdieu, (...)
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  40.  6
    Li Che-Hou (1974). The Objective and the Social Aspects of Beauty: Comments on the Aesthetics of Chu Kuang-Ch'ien and Ts'ai I. Contemporary Chinese Thought 6 (2):54-68.
    After reading the essays of Mr. Ts'ai and Mr. Chu, I have a few immature opinions. Generally speaking, I feel that in dealing with the errors of their opponents, both Ts'ai I in his criticism of Huang Yüeh-mien and Chu Kuang-ch'ien in his criticism of Ts'ai I are quite accurate and convincing. However, in presenting their own arguments of what is right, both of them are on shaky ground and in error. That is because in one way or another, consciously (...)
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  41. Rosalyn Diprose (1994). The Bodies of Women: Ethics, Embodiment, and Sexual Difference. Routledge.
    In The Bodies of Women , Rosalyn Diprose argues that traditional approaches to ethics both perpetuate and remain blind to the mechanisms of the subordination of women. She shows that injustice against women begins in the ways that social discourses and practices place women's embodied existence as improper and secondary to men. She intervenes into debates about sexual difference, ethics, philosophies of the body and theories of self in order to develop a new ethics which places sexual difference at (...)
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  42.  1
    Emile Durkheim & Greg Yudin (2013). The Dualism of Human Nature and its Social Conditions. Russian Sociological Review 12 (2):133-144.
    This paper briefly summarizes Durkheim’s theory of the dual nature of man suggested earlier in his Elementary Forms of Religious Life. It is characteristic of human beings that two opposite principles confront each other within them: soul and body, concept and sensation, moral activity and sensory appetites. Although this inherent inconsistency of man has been long recognized by philosophical thought, no doctrine explanation to it has been provided to date. While empiricist monism has proved to be unable to explain (...)
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  43.  14
    Mary I. Bockover (2012). Confucian Ritual as Body Language of Self, Society, and Spirit. Sophia 51 (2):177-194.
    This article explains how li 禮 or ‘ritual propriety’ is the ‘body language’ of ren 仁 or the authentic expression of our humanity. Li and ren are interdependent aspects of a larger creative human way (rendao 仁道) that can be conceptually distinguished as follows: li refers to the ritualized social form of appropriate conduct and ren to the more general, authentically human spirit this expresses. Li is the social instrument for self-cultivation and the vehicle of (...)
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  44. Samuel Freeman (2006). The Law of Peoples, Social Cooperation, Human Rights, and Distributive Justice. Social Philosophy and Policy 23 (1):29-68.
    Cosmopolitans argue that the account of human rights and distributive justice in John Rawls's The Law of Peoples is incompatible with his argument for liberal justice. Rawls should extend his account of liberal basic liberties and the guarantees of distributive justice to apply to the world at large. This essay defends Rawls's grounding of political justice in social cooperation. The Law of Peoples is drawn up to provide principles of foreign policy for liberal peoples. Human rights are (...)
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  45.  5
    J. M. Ziman (1981). Puzzles, Problems, and Enigmas: Occasional Pieces on the Human Aspects of Science. Cambridge University Press.
    A discussion of the human side of science, originally published in 1981.
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  46.  40
    Hillel Steiner (2004). The Right to Trade in Human Body Parts. In Jonathan Seglow (ed.), Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy. F. Cass Publishers 187-193.
    This essay challenges the coherence of arguments brought in support of prohibiting the sale of human body parts. Considerations of neither social utility nor individual rights nor avoidance of exploitation seem sufficient to ground such a prohibition. Indeed, they may be sufficient to invalidate it.
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  47.  10
    Silvia Staub-Bernasconi (2011). Human Rights and Social Work: Philosophical and Ethical Reflections on a Possible Dialogue Between East Asia and the West. Ethics and Social Welfare 5 (4):331-347.
    The ?West? is inclined to blame Asian countries, especially China, for its disrespect of human rights without looking at it's own record of human rights violations! This makes a fair dialogue very difficult till improbable. Social work on the international level can't avoid this dialogue if it wants to live up to its internationally consensual documents which all refer to human rights. The thesis of this article is, that it will only succeed, if it clarifies some (...)
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  48.  17
    Eric Matthews (2007). Body-Subjects and Disordered Minds. Oxford University Press.
    How should we deal with mental disorder - as an "illness" like diabetes or bronchitis, as a "problem in living", or what? This book seeks to answer such questions by going to their roots, in philosophical questions about the nature of the human mind, the ways in which it can be understood, and about the nature and aims of scientific medicine. The controversy over the nature of mental disorder and the appropriateness of the "medical model" is not just an (...)
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  49.  16
    Simon V. Glynn (2014). Alfred Schutz, the Epistemology and Methodology of the Human and Social Sciences, and the Subjective Foundations of Objectivity. Schutzian Research 6:61-74.
    Long debated has been whether or not the “objectivistic” epistemologies, quantitative methods and causal explanations, developed by the natural sciences for the study of physical objects, their actions and interactions, might also be applied to the study of human subjects, their experiences, actions and social interactions. Pointing out that such supposedly objective approaches would be singularly inappropriate to the study of the significance or meanings, qualitative values and freedom of choice, widely regarded as essential aspects of (...) subjects, their experiences, actions, and social interactions, and drawing attention, a la Alfred Schutz, to the two meanings of the term “subjective” it is first argued that many of the claims of the natural sciences themselves are “empirically” unverifiable, in the Positivistic sense of that term. Moreover, and most crucially, it is further argued that the “objectivity” of an experience cannot be empirically established on the basis of its supposed correspondence to some “objective” world—for, as precisely appearance or experience transcending, the existence of such a world, much less its nature, is clearly empirically unverifiable—and must therefore rest upon inter-subjective coherence, which in turn must, as Schutz has pointed out, depend precisely upon the very subjective experiences which those who would council such an “objective” approach, had ipso facto, sought to avoid as unverifiable. Thus, paradoxically, the criterion of objective verification cannot itself be objectively verified, but rests upon appeals to “subjective” experiences. (shrink)
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  50.  5
    Ricardo de Oliveira-Souza, Jorge Moll & Jordan Grafman (2011). Emotion and Social Cognition: Lessons From Contemporary Human Neuroanatomy. Emotion Review 3 (3):310-312.
    Two paradigms have guided emotion research over the past decades. The dual-system view embraces the long-held Western belief, espoused most prominently by decision-making and social cognition researchers, that emotion and reason are often at odds. The integrative view, which asserts that emotion and cognition work synergistically, has been less explored experimentally. However, the integrative view (a) may help explain several findings that are not easily accounted for by the dual-system approach, and (b) is better (...)
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