Search results for 'Body, Human Social aspects' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Nick Crossley (2001). The Social Body: Habit, Identity and Desire. Sage.score: 660.0
    This book explores both the embodied nature of social life and the social nature of human bodily life. It provides an accessible review of the contemporary social science debates on the body, and develops a coherent new perspective. Nick Crossley critically reviews the literature on mind and body, and also on the body and society. He draws on theoretical insights from the work of Gilbert Ryle, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, George Herbert Mead and Pierre Bourdieu, and shows how (...)
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  2. Iris Marion Young (2005). On Female Body Experience: "Throwing Like a Girl" and Other Essays. Oxford University Press.score: 492.0
    Written over a span of more than two decades, the essays by Iris Marion Young collected in this volume describe diverse aspects of women's lived body experience in modern Western societies. Drawing on the ideas of several twentieth century continental philosophers--including Simone de Beauvoir, Martin Heidegger, Luce Irigaray, Julia Kristeva, and Maurice Merleau-Ponty--Young constructs rigorous analytic categories for interpreting embodied subjectivity. The essays combine theoretical description of experience with normative evaluation of the unjust constraints on their freedom and opportunity (...)
     
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  3. Jean Bethke Elshtain & J. Timothy Cloyd (eds.) (1995). Politics and the Human Body: Assault on Dignity. Vanderbilt University Press.score: 486.0
    Who or what determines the right to die? Do advancing reproductive technologies change reproductive rights? What forces influence cultural standards of beauty? How do discipline, punishment, and torture reflect our attitudes about the human body? In this challenging new book, Jean Bethke Elshtain, a nationally recognized scholar in political science and philosophy, and J. Timothy Cloyd, a strong new voice in social and political science, have assembled a collection of thought-provoking essays on these issues written by some of (...)
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  4. Moira Gatens (1996). Imaginary Bodies: Ethics, Power, and Corporeality. Routledge.score: 468.0
    Imaginary Bodies is a collection of essays that offer a sustained challenge to traditional philosophical notions of the body, sex and gender. Moira Gatens explores alternative positions to dualism by exploring psychoanalytic, Foucaultian and Spinozist notions of embodiment. The book traces a largely neglected geneaology of philosophers from Spinoza, Nietzsche, Freud, Foucault and Deleuze and sets this tradition against that of the Enlightenment. What emerges are new ways of thinking those aspects of life which Gatens calls "imaginary." Confining herself (...)
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  5. David Michael Kleinberg-Levin (1985). The Body's Recollection of Being: Phenomenological Psychology and the Deconstruction of Nihilism. Routledge & Kegan Paul.score: 456.0
    Expands our understanding of the human potential of spiritual self-realization by interpreting it as the developing of a bodily-felt awareness informing our ...
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  6. Edward Tenner (2003). Our Own Devices: The Past and Future of Body Technology. Alfred A. Knopf.score: 456.0
    Machine generated contents note: Preface ix -- Chapter One: Technology, Technique, and the Body 3 --Chapter Two: The First Technology: Bottle-Feeding 30 --Chapter Three: Slow Motion: Zori 51 --Chapter Four: Double Time: Athletic Shoes 75 --Chapter Five: Sitting Up Straight: Posture Chairs 104 --Chapter Six: Laid Back: Reclining Chairs 134 --Chapter Seven: Mechanical Arts: Musical Keyboards 161 --Chapter Eight: Letter Perfect?: Text Keyboards 187 --Chapter Nine: Second Sight: Eyeglasses 213 --Chapter Ten: Hardheaded Logic: Helmets 238 --Epilogue: Thumbs Up 263 -- (...)
     
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  7. Lynda I. A. Birke (2000). Feminism and the Biological Body. Rutgers University Press.score: 444.0
  8. Shirley Castelnuovo (1998). Feminism and the Female Body: Liberating the Amazon Within. L. Rienner Publishers.score: 444.0
  9. Insa Härtel & Sigrid Schade (eds.) (2002). Body and Representation. Leske + Budrich.score: 444.0
  10. Shigehisa Kuriyama (1999). The Expressiveness of the Body and the Divergence of Greek and Chinese Medicine. Zone Books.score: 444.0
     
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  11. E. A. Grosz (1994). Volatile Bodies: Toward a Corporeal Feminism. Allen & Unwin.score: 432.0
    Introduction and acknowledgments Part I. Introduction 1 Refiguring bodies Part II The inside out 2 Psychoanalysis and physical topographies 3 Body images: ...
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  12. Margrit Shildrick (1997). Leaky Bodies and Boundaries: Feminism, Postmodernism and (Bio)Ethics. Routledge.score: 432.0
    Drawing on postmodernist analyses, Leaky Bodies and Boundaries presents a feminist investigation into the marginalization of women within western discourse that denies both female moral agency and bodylines. With reference to contemporary and historical issues in biomedicine, the book argues that the boundaries of both the subject and the body are no longer secure. The aim is both to valorize women and to suggest that "leakiness" may be the very ground for a postmodern feminist ethic. The contribution made by Margrit (...)
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  13. Ludwig Siep (2003). Normative Aspects of the Human Body. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 28 (2):171 – 185.score: 432.0
    In cultural history the human body has been the object of a great variety of opposing valuations, ranging from "imago dei" to "the devil's tool". At present, the body is commonly regarded as a mere means to fulfill the wishes of its "owner". According to these wishes it can be technically improved in an unlimited way. Against this view the text argues for a conception of the human body as a valuable "common heritage". The "normal" human body (...)
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  14. E. A. Grosz (1995). Space, Time, and Perversion: Essays on the Politics of Bodies. Routledge.score: 432.0
    Marking a ground-breaking moment in the debate surrounding bodies and "body politics," Elizabeth Grosz's Space, Time and Perversion contends that only by resituating and rethinking the body will feminism and cultural analysis effect and unsettle the knowledges, disciplines and institutions which have controlled, regulated and managed the body both ideologically and materially. Exploring the fields of architecture, philosophy, and--in a controversial way--queer theory, Grosz shows how these fields have conceptually stripped bodies of their specificity, their corporeality, and the vestigal traces (...)
     
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  15. Catherine Kevin (ed.) (2009). Feminism and the Body: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Cambridge Scholars.score: 432.0
  16. Myra J. Hird (2004). Sex, Gender, and Science. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 420.0
    In Sex, Gender and Science , Myra Hird outlines the social study of science and nature, specifically in relation to sex, sex differences, and sexuality. She examines how Western understandings of sex are based less upon understanding material sex differences than on a discourse that emphasizes sex dichotomy over sex diversity and argues for a feminist engagement with scientific debate that embraces the diversity and complexity of nature.
     
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  17. Francisco Ortega (2010). El Cuerpo Incierto: Corporeidad, Tecnologías Médicas y Cultura Contemporánea. Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas.score: 396.0
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  18. Mercedes Arriaga Flórez (ed.) (2006). Sin Carne: Representaciones y Simulacros Del Cuerpo Femenino: Tecnología, Comunicación y Poder. Arcibel Editores.score: 396.0
  19. Jesús Ballesteros & Encarna Fernández (eds.) (2007). Biotecnología y Posthumanismo. Editorial Aranzadi.score: 396.0
    La obra recoge, desde una perspectiva interdisciplinar, las aportaciones de un grupo de investigadores españoles e italianos que han trabajado conjuntamente durante varios años en distintas cuestiones en torno a las posibilidades y riesgos de los avances biotecnológicos y su incidencia en el campo de los derechos humanos. Los estudios y debates se han realizado en el marco del programa de doctorado internacional sobre "Derechos humanos: Problemas actuales" encabezado por las Universidades de Valencia y Palermo. El Profesor Jesús Ballesteros, Catedrático (...)
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  20. Maria Bernardete Ramos Flores (2007). Tecnologia E Estética Do Racismo: Ciência E Arte Na Política da Beleza. Argos Editora Universitária.score: 396.0
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  21. Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen, Mads Rosendahl Thomsen & Jacob Wamberg (eds.) (2012). The Posthuman Condition: Ethics, Aesthetics and Politics of Biotechnological Challenges. Aarhus University Press ;.score: 396.0
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  22. Marek S. Szczepański (2010). Potyczki Psyche I Soma: Elementy Socjologii Ciała I Aktywności Fizycznej. Wydawn. Uniwersytetu Opolskiego.score: 396.0
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  23. Helga Treichl (2005). Technik, Medien Und Gender: Zum "Paradigmenwechsel" des Körpers. Turia + Kant.score: 396.0
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  24. Petya Puncheva-Michelotti, Marco Michelotti & Peter Gahan (2010). The Relationship Between Individuals' Recognition of Human Rights and Responses to Socially Responsible Companies: Evidence From Russia and Bulgaria. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 93 (4):583 - 605.score: 360.0
    An emerging body of literature has highlighted a gap in our understanding of the extent to which the salience attached to human rights is likely to influence the extent to which an individual takes account of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in decision making. The primary aim of this study is to begin to address this gap by understanding how individuals attribute different emphasis on specific aspects of human rights when making decisions to purchase, work, invest or (...)
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  25. Paula M. Cooey (1994). Religious Imagination and the Body: A Feminist Analysis. Oxford University Press.score: 318.0
    In recent years feminist scholarship has increasingly focused on the importance of the body and its representations in virtually every social, cultural, and intellectual context. Many have argued that because women are more closely identified with their bodies, they have access to privileged and different kinds of knowledge than men. In this landmark new book, Paula Cooey offers a different perspective on the significance of the body in the context of religious life and practice. Building on the pathbreaking work (...)
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  26. Richard Shusterman (2008). Body Consciousness: A Philosophy of Mindfulness and Somaesthetics. Cambridge University Press.score: 300.0
    Contemporary culture increasingly suffers from problems of attention, over-stimulation, and stress, and a variety of personal and social discontents generated by deceptive body images. This book argues that improved body consciousness can relieve these problems and enhance one’s knowledge, performance, and pleasure. The body is our basic medium of perception and action, but focused attention to its feelings and movements has long been criticized as a damaging distraction that also ethically corrupts through self-absorption. In Body Consciousness, Richard Shusterman refutes (...)
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  27. Rosalyn Diprose (1994). The Bodies of Women: Ethics, Embodiment, and Sexual Difference. Routledge.score: 288.0
    In The Bodies of Women , Rosalyn Diprose argues that traditional approaches to ethics both perpetuate and remain blind to the mechanisms of the subordination of women. She shows that injustice against women begins in the ways that social discourses and practices place women's embodied existence as improper and secondary to men. She intervenes into debates about sexual difference, ethics, philosophies of the body and theories of self in order to develop a new ethics which places sexual difference at (...)
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  28. Juha Marko Lahnakoski, Enrico Glerean, Juha Salmi, Iiro P. Jääskeläinen, Mikko Sams, Riitta Hari & Lauri Nummenmaa (2012). Naturalistic fMRI Mapping Reveals Superior Temporal Sulcus as the Hub for the Distributed Brain Network for Social Perception. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 280.0
    Despite the abundant data on brain networks processing static social signals, such as pictures of faces, the neural systems supporting social perception in naturalistic conditions are still poorly understood. Here we delineated brain networks subserving social perception under naturalistic conditions in 19 healthy humans who watched, during 3-tesla functional magnetic imaging (fMRI), a set of 137 short (~16 s each, total 27 min) audiovisual movie clips depicting pre-selected social signals. Two independent raters estimated how well each (...)
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  29. Mark Johnson (2007). The Meaning of the Body: Aesthetics of Human Understanding. University of Chicago Press.score: 261.0
    The belief that the mind and the body are separate and that the mind is the source of all meaning has been a part of Western culture for centuries. Both philosophers and scientists have questioned this dualism, but their efforts have rarely converged. Many philosophers continue to rely on disembodied models of human thought, while scientists tend to reduce the complex process of thinking to a merely physical phenomenon. In The Meaning of the Body , Mark Johnson continues his (...)
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  30. Russell Keat (1986). The Human Body in Social Theory: Reich, Foucault and the Repressive Hypothesis. Radical Philosophy 42 (1986):275-303.score: 256.5
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  31. Mary I. Bockover (2012). Confucian Ritual as Body Language of Self, Society, and Spirit. Sophia 51 (2):177-194.score: 252.0
    This article explains how li 禮 or ‘ritual propriety’ is the ‘body language’ of ren 仁 or the authentic expression of our humanity. Li and ren are interdependent aspects of a larger creative human way (rendao 仁道) that can be conceptually distinguished as follows: li refers to the ritualized social form of appropriate conduct and ren to the more general, authentically human spirit this expresses. Li is the social instrument for self-cultivation and the vehicle of (...)
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  32. European Group on Ethics in Science & New Technologies (2005). Ethical Aspects of ICT Implants in the Human Body. Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 10 (1).score: 243.0
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  33. Eric Matthews (2007). Body-Subjects and Disordered Minds. Oxford University Press.score: 240.0
    How should we deal with mental disorder - as an "illness" like diabetes or bronchitis, as a "problem in living", or what? This book seeks to answer such questions by going to their roots, in philosophical questions about the nature of the human mind, the ways in which it can be understood, and about the nature and aims of scientific medicine. The controversy over the nature of mental disorder and the appropriateness of the "medical model" is not just an (...)
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  34. Erin E. Hecht, Richard Patterson & Aron K. Barbey (2012). What Can Other Animals Tell Us About Human Social Cognition? An Evolutionary Perspective on Reflective and Reflexive Processing. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 229.5
    Human neuroscience has seen a recent boom in studies on reflective, controlled, explicit social cognitive functions like imitation, perspective‐taking, and empathy. The relationship of these higher‐level functions to lower‐level, reflexive, automatic, implicit functions is an area of current research. As the field continues to address this relationship, we suggest that an evolutionary, comparative approach will be useful, even essential. There is a large body of research on reflexive, automatic, implicit processes in animals. A growing perspective sees social (...)
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  35. A. K. Barbey E. E. Hecht, R. Patterson (2012). What Can Other Animals Tell Us About Human Social Cognition? An Evolutionary Perspective on Reflective and Reflexive Processing. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 229.5
    Human neuroscience has seen a recent boom in studies on reflective, controlled, explicit social cognitive functions like imitation, perspective‐taking, and empathy. The relationship of these higher‐level functions to lower‐level, reflexive, automatic, implicit functions is an area of current research. As the field continues to address this relationship, we suggest that an evolutionary, comparative approach will be useful, even essential. There is a large body of research on reflexive, automatic, implicit processes in animals. A growing perspective sees social (...)
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  36. H. M. Solli & A. Barbosa da Silva (2012). The Holistic Claims of the Biopsychosocial Conception of WHO's International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF): A Conceptual Analysis on the Basis of a Pluralistic-Holistic Ontology and Multidimensional View of the Human Being. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (3):277-294.score: 228.0
    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), designed by the WHO, attempts to provide a holistic model of functioning and disability by integrating a medical model with a social one. The aim of this article is to analyze the ICF’s claim to holism. The following components of the ICF’s complexity are analyzed: (1) health condition, (2) body functions and structures, (3) activity, (4) participation, (5) environmental factors, (6) personal factors, and (7) health. Although the ICF claims to (...)
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  37. Georgia Apostolopoulou (2007). Toward a Hermeneutic Anthropology of Human Rights. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 3:151-156.score: 228.0
    The hermeneutic anthropology of human rights is a possible anthropology before human rights. It does not aim at a deductive demonstration of the validity of human rights, but it delivers a hermeneutic justification of them by taking into account the a priori link of self-understanding with living body. Three aspects are most relevant in this case: a) The human person not only exists, but also has a value which is recognized within the shared world of (...)
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  38. Hans Magnus Solli & Antonio Barbosa Da Silva (2012). The Holistic Claims of the Biopsychosocial Conception of Who's International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (Icf): A Conceptual Analysis on the Basis of a Pluralistic-Holistic Ontology and Multidimensional View of the Human Being (Vol 37, Pg 277, 2012). [REVIEW] Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (5):277-294.score: 228.0
    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), designed by the WHO, attempts to provide a holistic model of functioning and disability by integrating a medical model with a social one. The aim of this article is to analyze the ICF’s claim to holism. The following components of the ICF’s complexity are analyzed: (1) health condition, (2) body functions and structures, (3) activity, (4) participation, (5) environmental factors, (6) personal factors, and (7) health. Although the ICF claims to (...)
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  39. D. B. Resnik (1998). The Commodification of Human Reproductive Materials. Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (6):388-393.score: 225.0
    This essay develops a framework for thinking about the moral basis for the commodification of human reproductive materials. It argues that selling and buying gametes and genes is morally acceptable although there should not be a market for zygotes, embryos, or genomes. Also a market in gametes and genes should be regulated in order to address concerns about the adverse social consequences of commodification.
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  40. Murat Ergin (2009). Cultural Encounters in the Social Sciences and Humanities: Western Émigré Scholars in Turkey. History of the Human Sciences 22 (1):105-130.score: 220.0
    Turkish modernization relied on the western social sciences and humanities not only as an abstract and distant model, but also in the form of close encounters and interactions with western refugee scholars. This article examines the activities of western intellectuals and experts who visited Turkey in the early republican era (1923—50), especially focusing on a group of émigré scholars who were employed in Turkey after the university reform of 1933. While European and North American social scientists were drawn (...)
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  41. John A. Teske (2013). From Embodied to Extended Cognition. Zygon 48 (3):759-787.score: 216.0
    Embodied cognitive science holds that cognitive processes are deeply and inescapably rooted in our bodily interactions with the world. Our finite, contingent, and mortal embodiment may be not only supportive, but in some cases even constitutive of emotions, thoughts, and experiences. My discussion here will work outward from the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of the brain to a nervous system which extends to the boundaries of the body. It will extend to nonneural aspects of embodiment and even beyond the boundaries (...)
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  42. Anna Luise Kirkengen (2008). Inscriptions of Violence: Societal and Medical Neglect of Child Abuse – Impact on Life and Health. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (1):99-110.score: 216.0
    ObjectiveA sickness history from General Practice will be unfolded with regard to its implicit lived meanings. This experiential matrix will be analyzed with regard to its medico-theoretical aspects.MethodThe analysis is grounded in a phenomenology of the body. The patient Katherine Kaplan lends a particular portrait to the dynamics that are enacted in the interface between socially silenced domestic violence and the theoretical assumptions of human health as these inform the clinical practice of health care.ResultsBy applying an understanding of (...)
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  43. Motoaki Sugiura (2013). Associative Account of Self-Cognition: Extended Forward Model and Multi-Layer Structure. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 216.0
    The neural correlates of “self” identified by neuroimaging studies differ depending on which aspects of self are addressed. Here, three categories of self are proposed based on neuroimaging findings and an evaluation of the likely underlying cognitive processes. The physical self, representing self-agency of action, body ownership, and bodily self-recognition, is supported by the sensory and motor association cortices located primarily in the right hemisphere. The interpersonal self, representing the attention or intentions of others directed at the self, is (...)
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  44. Londa L. Schiebinger (ed.) (2000). Feminism and the Body. Oxford University Press.score: 211.5
    Feminism and the Body presents classic texts in feminist body studies. Intended for undergraduate and graduate students, the volume touches on the medical history of sexual differences, the political history of the body, the history of clothing and its cultural meanings, symbolic renderings of the body, male bodies, and the body in colonial and cross-cultural contexts.
     
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  45. Theodore R. Schatzki (1996). Social Practices: A Wittgensteinian Approach to Human Activity and the Social. Cambridge University Press.score: 207.0
    This book addresses key topics in social theory such as the basic structures of social life, the character of human activity, and the nature of individuality. Drawing on the work of Wittgenstein, the author develops an account of social existence that argues that social practices are the fundamental phenomenon in social life. This approach offers new insight into the social formation of individuals, surpassing and critiquing the existing practice theories of Bourdieu, Giddens, Lyotard, (...)
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  46. Christopher Lawrence & Steven Shapin (eds.) (1998). Science Incarnate: Historical Embodiments of Natural Knowledge. The University of Chicago Press.score: 207.0
    Ever since Greek antiquity "disembodied knowledge" has often been taken as synonymous with "objective truth." Yet we also have very specific mental images of the kinds of bodies that house great minds--the ascetic philosopher versus the hearty surgeon, for example. Does truth have anything to do with the belly? What difference does it make to the pursuit of knowledge whether Einstein rode a bicycle, Russell was randy, or Darwin flatulent? Bringing body and knowledge into such intimate contact is occasionally seen (...)
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  47. Kevin A. Pelphrey, Juliana Lopez & James P. Morris (2009). Developmental Continuity and Change in Responses to Social and Nonsocial Categories in Human Extrastriate Visual Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.score: 204.0
    It is well known that adult human extrastriate visual cortex contains areas that respond in a selective fashion to specific categories of visual stimuli. Three regions have been identified with particular regularity: the fusiform face area (FFA), which responds to faces more than to other objects; the parahippocampal place area (PPA), which responds selectively to images of houses, places, and visual scenes; and the extrastriate body area (EBA), which responds specifically to images of bodies and body parts. While the (...)
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  48. Andrew Pithouse & Alyson Rees (2011). Care as Regulated and Care in the Obdurate World of Intimate Relations: Foster Care Divided? Ethics and Social Welfare 5 (2):196-209.score: 204.0
    This paper outlines briefly care as a formal construct of a highly regulatory approach to being looked after in the setting of foster care. It then moves on to consider care and its expression within the interdependencies and everyday moral ?workings out? between people in caring relationships. These relationships are informed partly by exterior regulation, but also emerge predominantly from care as a social process and daily human activity in which the self exists through and with others. Drawing (...)
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  49. Samuel Freeman (2006). The Law of Peoples, Social Cooperation, Human Rights, and Distributive Justice. Social Philosophy and Policy 23 (1):29-68.score: 198.0
    Cosmopolitans argue that the account of human rights and distributive justice in John Rawls's The Law of Peoples is incompatible with his argument for liberal justice. Rawls should extend his account of liberal basic liberties and the guarantees of distributive justice to apply to the world at large. This essay defends Rawls's grounding of political justice in social cooperation. The Law of Peoples is drawn up to provide principles of foreign policy for liberal peoples. Human rights are (...)
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  50. James Mensch (2009). Embodiments: From the Body to the Body Politic. Northwestern University Press.score: 198.0
    The intertwining: the recursion of the seer and the seen -- Artificial intelligence and the phenomenology of flesh -- Aesthetic education and the project of being human -- The intertwining of incommensurables: Yann Martel's life of Pi -- Flesh and the limits of self-making -- Violence and embodiment -- Excessive presence and the image -- Politics and freedom -- Sovereignty and alterity -- Political violence -- Public space -- Sustaining the other: tolerance as a positive ideal -- Forgiveness and (...)
     
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