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Bonnie Honig [23]Bonnie Helen Honig [1]
  1. Bonnie Honig (ed.) (1995). Feminist Interpretations of Hannah Arendt. Penn State University Press.
    Feminist Interpretations of Hannah Arendt, edited by Bonnie Honig, a collection of critical feminist essays on Hannah Arendt, illustrates both the disorientation and the insights that can result when feminist philosophers come to terms with a canonical figure who is a woman.
     
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  2.  20
    Bonnie Honig (1993). Political Theory and the Displacement of Politics. Cornell University Press.
    CHAPTER ONK Negotiating Positions: The Politics of Virtue and Virtu [Virtu] rouses enmity toward order, toward the lies that are concealed in every order, ...
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  3. Bonnie Honig (2011). Review Article: The Politics of Ethos Stephen White The Ethos of a Late-Modern Citizen. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2009. European Journal of Political Theory 10 (3):422-429.
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  4.  5
    Bonnie Honig (2002). [Book Review] Democracy and the Foreigner. [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 16 (1):129-134.
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  5.  53
    Mathew Humphrey, David Owen, Joe Hoover, Clare Woodford, Alan Finlayson, Marc Stears & Bonnie Honig (2014). Humanism From an Agonistic Perspective: Themes From the Work of Bonnie Honig. Contemporary Political Theory 13 (2):168-217.
    This paper examines Honig’s use of Rancière in her book ‘Democracy and the Foreigner’. In seeking to clarify the benefits of ‘foreignness’ for democratic politics it raises the concern that Honig does not acknowledge the ways in which her own democratic cosmopolitanism may be more akin to Rancière’s police than politics. By challenging Honig’s assertion that democracy is usually read as a romance with the suggestion that it is more commonly read as a horror, I unpick the interstices of Honig’s (...)
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  6. Bonnie Honig (1992). Toward an Agonistic Feminism: Hannah Arendt and the Politics of Identity. In Judith Butler & Joan Wallach Scott (eds.), Feminists Theorize the Political. Routledge 215--35.
     
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  7. Bonnie Honig (1993). The Politics of Agonism: A Critical Response to "Beyond Good and Evil: Arendt, Nietzsche, and the Aestheticization of Political Action" by Dana R. Villa. Political Theory 21 (3):528-533.
  8.  13
    Bonnie Honig (1994). Difference, Dilemmas, and the Politics of Home. Social Research 61:563-598.
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  9. Bonnie Honig (2011). Emergency Politics: Paradox, Law, Democracy. Princeton University Press.
    This book intervenes in contemporary debates about the threat posed to democratic life by political emergencies. Must emergency necessarily enhance and centralize top-down forms of sovereignty? Those who oppose executive branch enhancement often turn instead to law, insisting on the sovereignty of the rule of law or demanding that law rather than force be used to resolve conflicts with enemies. But are these the only options? Or are there more democratic ways to respond to invocations of emergency politics? Looking at (...)
     
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  10.  9
    Bonnie Honig (2008). The Miracle of Metaphor: Rethinking the State of Exception with Rosenzweig and Schmitt. Diacritics 37 (2-3):78-102.
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  11.  44
    Bonnie Honig (2001). Dead Rights, Live Futures: A Reply to Habermas's "Constitutional Democracy". Political Theory 29 (6):792-805.
  12.  8
    John S. Dryzek, Bonnie Honig & Anne Phillips (2008). The Oxford Handbook of Political Theory. OUP Oxford.
    Oxford Handbooks of Political Science are the essential guide to the state of political science today. With engaging contributions from 51 major international scholars, the Oxford Handbook of Political Theory provides the key point of reference for anyone working in political theory and beyond.
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  13. Bonnie Honig (2008). The Time of Rights : Emergency Thoughts in an Emergency Setting. In David Campbell & Morton Schoolman (eds.), The New Pluralism: William Connolly and the Contemporary Global Condition. Duke University Press
  14. Bonnie Honig (2005). Bound by Law? : Alien Rights, Administrative Discretion, and the Politics of Technicality : Lessons From Louis Post and the First Red Scare. In Lawrence Douglas, Austin Sarat & Martha Merrill Umphrey (eds.), The Limits of Law. Stanford University Press 209--45.
     
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  15.  29
    Bonnie Honig (1997). Ruth, the Model Emigrée: Mourning and the Symbolic Politics of Immigration. Political Theory 25 (1):112-136.
    And we Americans are the peculiar, chosen people—the Israelites of our time.Herman Melville.
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  16.  1
    Bonnie Honig (2016). What Kind of Thing Is Land? Hannah Arendt’s Object Relations, Or: The Jewish Unconscious of Arendt’s Most “Greek” Text. Political Theory 44 (3):307-336.
    Informed by D. W. Winnicott’s object relations theory, and focused on the role of Things in constituting the world that is the object of Arendtian care, this essay examines Hannah Arendt’s treatment in The Human Condition of two liminal examples, cultivated land and poetry, that hover on the borders of Labor, Work, and/or Action. Cultivated land could belong to Work because cultivation leaves a lasting mark on the land, but it is assigned to Labor because land, once it is left (...)
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  17.  1
    Keri Walsh, Vasuki Nesiah, Emily Wilson, Stefani Engelstein, Olga Taxidou & Bonnie Honig (2015). Book Discussion: Bonnie Honig, Antigone, Interrupted. Philosophy Today 59 (3):555-578.
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  18. Bonnie Honig (2013). Antigone, Interrupted. Cambridge University Press.
    Sophocles' Antigone is a touchstone in democratic, feminist and legal theory, and possibly the most commented upon play in the history of philosophy and political theory. Bonnie Honig's rereading of it therefore involves intervening in a host of literatures and unsettling many of their governing assumptions. Exploring the power of Antigone in a variety of political, cultural, and theoretical settings, Honig identifies the 'Antigone-effect' - which moves those who enlist Antigone for their politics from activism into lamentation. She argues that (...)
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  19. Bonnie Honig (2009). Emergency Politics: Paradox, Law, Democracy. Princeton University Press.
    This book intervenes in contemporary debates about the threat posed to democratic life by political emergencies. Must emergency necessarily enhance and centralize top-down forms of sovereignty? Those who oppose executive branch enhancement often turn instead to law, insisting on the sovereignty of the rule of law or demanding that law rather than force be used to resolve conflicts with enemies. But are these the only options? Or are there more democratic ways to respond to invocations of emergency politics? Looking at (...)
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  20.  49
    Bonnie Honig (2009). Antigone's Laments, Creon's Grief: Mourning, Membership, and the Politics of Exception. Political Theory 37 (1):5-43.
    This paper reads Sophocles' " Antigone " contextually, as an exploration of the politics of lamentation and larger conflicts these stand for. Antigone defies Creon's sovereign decree that her brother Polynices, who attacked the city with a foreign army and died in battle, be dishonoured - left unburied. But the play is not about Polynices' treason. It explores the clash in 5th century Athens between Homeric/elite and democratic mourning practices. The former memorialize the unique individuality of the dead, focus on (...)
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