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  1. Brad Frazier (2006). Rorty and Kierkegaard on Irony and Moral Commitment: Philosophical and Theological Connections. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This book seeks to clarify the concept of irony and its relation to moral commitment. Frazier provides a discussion of the contrasting accounts of Richard Rorty and Søren Kierkegaard. He argues that, while Rorty's position is much more defensible and thoughtful than his detractors tend to recognize, it turns out to be surprisingly more parochial than Kierkegaard's.
     
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  2. Brad Frazier (2006). The Ethics of Rortian Redescription. Philosophy and Social Criticism 32 (4):461-492.
    Certain features of Richard Rorty's account of liberal irony have provoked serious moral criticisms from some of his peers. In particular, Rorty's claim that anything can be made to look good or bad by being redescribed has struck some philosophers, such as Richard Bernstein and Jean Bethke Elshtain, for instance, as morally outrageous. In this article, I examine these criticisms and clarify the meaning and implications of Rorty's position. I argue that a more careful reading of Rorty reveals that his (...)
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  3. Brad Frazier (2004). Kierkegaard on the Problems of Pure Irony. Journal of Religious Ethics 32 (3):417 - 447.
    Søren Kierkegaard's thesis, "The Concept of Irony", contains an interesting critique of pure irony. Kierkegaard's critique turns on two main claims: (a) pure irony is an incoherent and thus, unrealizable stance; (b) the pursuit of pure irony is morally enervating, psychologically destructive, and culminates in bondage to moods. In this essay, first I attempt to clarify Kierkegaard's understanding of pure irony as "infinite absolute negativity." Then I set forth his multilayered critique of pure irony. Finally, I consider briefly a distinctly (...)
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  4. Brad Frazier (2004). Kierkegaard on Mastered Irony. International Philosophical Quarterly 44 (4):465-479.
    After extensively critiquing the stance of pure irony in the second half of The Concept of Irony, Kierkegaard attempts to recover the “truth of irony,” as he puts it, in a brief but suggestive conclusion. A main feature of the “truth of irony” turns out to be that irony, when mastered, is an indispensable component in an ethical way of life. In this paper I attempt to clarify Kierkegaard’s account of mastered irony. I discuss the analogy that Kierkegaard offers between (...)
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  5. Gregory R. Beabout & Brad Frazier (2000). A Challenge to the "Solitary Self" Interpretation of Kierkegaard. History of Philosophy Quarterly 17 (1):75 - 98.
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