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Profile: Brad Hooker (University of Reading)
  1. Brad Hooker, Discussion.
    The ‘publicity requirement on moral rules’ refers to the idea that moral rules must be suitable for public acknowledgement and acceptance. The idea is that moral rules must be suitable for being ‘widely known and explicitly recognized’, suitable for teaching as part of moral education, suitable for guiding behaviour and reactions to behaviour, and thus suitable for justifying one’s behaviour to others. The publicity requirement is now most often associated with John Rawls, who traces it back through Kurt Baier to (...)
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  2. Brad Hooker, Promises and Rule-Consequentialism.
    The duty to keep promises has many aspects associated with deontological moral theories. The duty to keep promises is non-welfarist, in that the obligation to keep a promise need not be conditional on there being a net benefit from keeping the promise—indeed need not be conditional on there being at least someone who would benefit from its being kept. The duty to keep promises is more closely connected to autonomy than directly to welfare: agents have moral powers to give themselves (...)
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  3. Brad Hooker, Publicity in Morality.
    Consider the idea that moral rules must be suitable for public acknowledgement and acceptance, i.e., that moral rules must be suitable for being ‘widely known and explicitly recognized’, suitable for teaching as part of moral education, suitable for guiding behaviour and reactions to behaviour, and thus suitable for justifying one’s behaviour to others. This idea is now most often associated with John Rawls, who traces it back through Kurt Baier to Kant.[1] My book developing ruleconsequentialism, Ideal Code, Real World, accepted (...)
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  4. Brad Hooker, The Demandingness Objection.
    This paper’s first section invokes a relevant meta-ethical principle about what a moral theory needs in order to be plausible and superior to its rivals. In subsequent sections, I try to pinpoint exactly what the demandingness objection has been taken to be. I try to explain how the demandingness objection developed in reaction to impartial act-consequentialism’s requirement of beneficence toward strangers. In zeroing in on the demandingness objection, I distinguish it from other, more or less closely related, objections. In particular, (...)
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  5. David Bakhurst, Margaret Olivia Little & Brad Hooker (eds.) (2013). Thinking About Reasons: Themes From the Philosophy of Jonathan Dancy. Oxford University Press.
    Thinking about Reasons collects fourteen new essays on ethics and the philosophy of action, inspired by the work of Jonathan Dancy—one of his generation's most influential moral philosophers.
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  6. Miranda Fricker Crisp, Brad Hooker, Simon Kirchin, Kelvin Knight, Adrian Moore & Daniel C. Russell (2013). 7 Virtue Ethics in the Twentieth Century. In Daniel C. Russell (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Virtue Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
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  7. Brad Hooker (2013). Egoism, Partiality, and Impartiality. In Roger Crisp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Ethics. Oxford University Press.
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  8. Brad Hooker (ed.) (2012). Developing Deontology: New Essays in Ethical Theory. Wiley.
    The contributions to this book expand the boundaries of thought relating to deontology. Together, they provide a major addition to the field of moral philosophy for advanced undergraduates, postgraduates and academics.
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  9. Brad Hooker (2012). Theory Vs Anti-Theory. In Ulrika Heuer Gerald Lang (ed.), Luck, Value, and Commitment: Themes from the Moral Philosophy of Bernard Williams. Oxford University Press.
    Bernard Williams influentially attacked ethical theory. This paper assesses arguments for the ‘anti-theory’ position in ethics, including mainly arguments put forward by Williams but also arguments put forward by others. The paper begins by discussing what is supposed to be theory in ethics and what ethical intuitions are taken to be by those involved in the theory versus anti-theory debate. Then the paper responds to the objections that ethical theory is mistaken to prize principles, mistaken to prize rationalism, mistaken to (...)
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  10. Brad Hooker (2012). Theory Versus Anti-Theory in Ethics. In Ulrike Heuer & Gerald Lang (eds.), Luck, Value, and Commitment: Themes From the Ethics of Bernard Williams. Oxford University Press, Usa. 19.
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  11. Garrett Cullity, Brad Hooker & Tim Mulgan (2011). Intuitions and the Demands of Consequentialism. Utilitas 23 (1).
  12. Brad Hooker (2011). Morality and the Good Life. The Philosophers' Magazine 53 (53):91-95.
    Being moral sometimes handicaps decent people in their pursuit of worthwhile goals. This is especially likely to happen when those with power in society have badly mistaken ideas about what morality requires. A good person might not last long in a bad society.
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  13. Brad Hooker (2010). Consequentialism. In John Skorupski (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Ethics. Routledge.
     
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  14. Brad Hooker (2010). Griffin on Human Rights. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 30 (1):193-205.
    This review article considers James Griffin's book On Human Rights, which is an immensely important contribution to moral and political thought. The review article starts by explaining why Griffin thinks that the term ‘human right’ suffers from an unacceptable indeterminateness of sense, and then summarizes Griffin's objections to various prominent accounts of human rights. An outline of Griffin's own account of human rights follows. His theory grounds human rights in ‘personhood’ and practicalities. The final section of the article explores Griffin's (...)
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  15. Brad Hooker (2010). On What Matters. The Philosophers' Magazine 50 (50):66-67.
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  16. Brad Hooker (2010). Publicity in Morality: A Reply to Katarzyna de Lazari-Radek and Peter Singer. Ratio 23 (1):111-117.
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  17. Brad Hooker (2010). When is Impartiality Morally Appropriate? In Brian Feltham & John Cottingham (eds.), Partiality and Impartiality: Morality, Special Relationships, and the Wider World. Oup Oxford.
     
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  18. Brad Hooker (2009). Up and Down with Aggregation. Social Philosophy and Policy 26 (1):126-147.
    This paper starts by addressing some objections to the very idea of aggregate social good. The paper goes on to review the case for letting aggregate social good be not only morally relevant but also sometimes morally decisive. Then the paper surveys objections to letting aggregate social good determine personal or political decisions. The paper goes on to argue against the idea that aggregate good is sensitive to desert and the idea that aggregate good should be construed as incorporating agent-relativity.
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  19. Brad Hooker (2008). American Moral Philosophy. In C. J. Misak (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of American Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
     
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  20. Brad Hooker (2008). Fairness, Needs, and Desert. In Matthew H. Kramer (ed.), The Legacy of H.L.A. Hart: Legal, Political, and Moral Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
     
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  21. Brad Hooker (2008). Justice, Fairness, and Hart. In Matthew Kramer, Claire Grant, Ben Colburn & Antony Hatzistavrou (eds.), The Legacy of H.L.A. Hart: Legal, Political and Moral Philosophy. Oup Oxford.
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  22. Brad Hooker (2008). Moral Particularism and the Real World. In Mark Norris Lance, Matjaž Potrč & Vojko Strahovnik (eds.), Challenging Moral Particularism. Routledge. 12--30.
     
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  23. Brad Hooker (2008). Rule-Consequentialism and Its Virtues. Rivista di Filosofia 99 (3):491-510.
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  24. Brad Hooker (2008). The Meaning of Life: Subjectivism, Objectivism, and Divine Support. In Samantha Vice & Nafsika Athanassoulis (eds.), The Moral Life. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  25. Brad Hooker & Guy Fletcher (2008). Variable Versus Fixed-Rate Rule-Utilitarianism. Philosophical Quarterly 58 (231):344–352.
    Fixed-rate versions of rule-consequentialism and rule-utilitarianism evaluate rules in terms of the expected net value of one particular level of social acceptance, but one far enough below 100% social acceptance to make salient the complexities created by partial compliance. Variable-rate versions of rule-consequentialism and rule-utilitarianism instead evaluate rules in terms of their expected net value at all different levels of social acceptance. Brad Hooker has advocated a fixed-rate version. Michael Ridge has argued that the variable-rate version is better. The debate (...)
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  26. Brad Hooker & Gianfranco Pellegrino (2008). Le virtù del conseguenzialismo della regola. Rivista di Filosofia 99 (3):491-509.
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  27. Brad Hooker (2007). Just Deserts? The Philosophers' Magazine 39:20-25.
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  28. Brad Hooker (2007). Rule-Consequentialism and Internal Consistency: A Reply to Card. Utilitas 19 (4):514-519.
    Rule-consequentialism has been accused of either collapsing into act-consequentialism or being internally inconsistent. I have tried to develop a form of rule-consequentialism without these flaws. In this June's issue of Utilitas, Robert Card argued that I have failed. Here I assess his arguments.
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  29. Brad Hooker (2007). Review of George Sher, In Praise of Blame. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (3).
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  30. Philip Stratton-Lake & Brad Hooker (2006). Scanlon Versus Moore on Goodness. In Terry Horgan & Mark Timmons (eds.), Metaethics After Moore. Oxford University Press. 149.
  31. Brad Hooker (2005). Fairness. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 8 (4):329 - 352.
    The main body of this paper assesses a leading recent theory of fairness, a theory put forward by John Broome. I discuss Broome's theory partly because of its prominence and partly because I think it points us in the right direction, even if it takes some missteps. In the course of discussing Broome's theory, I aim to cast light on the relation of fairness to consistency, equality, impartiality, desert, rights, and agreements. Indeed, before I start assessing Broome's theory, I discuss (...)
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  32. Brad Hooker (2005). Reply to Arneson and McIntyre. Philosophical Issues 15 (1):264–281.
    Richard Arneson and Alison McIntyre have done me a great honor by reading my book Ideal Code, Real World so carefully.1 In addition, they have done me a great kindness by reading it sympathetically. Nevertheless, they each find the book ultimately unconvincing, though in very different ways. But the cause of their dissatisfaction with the book is not mistaken interpretation. They have interpreted the book accurately, and they have advanced penetrating criticisms of it. One group of their criticisms definitely draw (...)
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  33. Brad Hooker (2005). Some Questions Not to Be Begged in Moral Theory. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (2):277-284.
    This paper starts by considering Sterba’s argument from non-question-beggingness to morality. The paper goes on to discuss his use of the “ought” implies “can” principle and the place, within moral theorizing, of intuitions about reasonableness.
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  34. Brad Hooker (2005). The Golden Rule. Think 4 (10):25-29.
    Should you always do unto others as you would have them do unto you? Brad Hooker investigates a seemingly plausible-looking moral principle: the Golden Rule.
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  35. Brad Hooker (2004). The Good and the Godless. The Philosophers' Magazine 26:57-57.
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  36. Brad Hooker & Bart Streumer (2004). Procedural and Substantive Practical Rationality. In Piers Rawling & Alfred R. Mele (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Rationality. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 57--74.
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  37. Brad Hooker (2003). Comments: Dancy on How Reasons Are Related to Oughts. Southern Journal of Philosophy 41 (Supplement):114-120.
  38. Brad Hooker (2003). Contractualism, Spare Wheel, Aggregation. In Matt Matravers (ed.), Scanlon and Contractualism. Frank Cass. 53-76.
    This essay explores the reasons for thinking that Scanlon's contractualist principle serves merely as a ?spare wheel?, an element that spins along nicely but bears no real weight, because it presupposes too much of what it should be explaning. The ambitions and scope of Scanlon's contractualism are discussed, as is Scanlon's thesis that contracualism will assess candidate moral principles individually rather than as sets. The final third of the paper critizes Scanlon's account of fairness and his approach to cases where (...)
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  39. Brad Hooker (2003). Dancy on How Reasons Are Related to Oughts. Southern Journal of Philosophy 41 (S1):114-120.
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  40. Brad Hooker (2003). Review of Nicholas Rescher, Fairness: Theory and Practice of Distributive Justice. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (8).
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  41. Brad Hooker (2003). Scanlon's Contractualism, the Spare Wheel Objection, and Aggregation'. In Matt Matravers (ed.), Scanlon and Contractualism. Frank Cass.
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  42. Brad Hooker (2003). The Demands of Consequentialism, by Tim Mulgan. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2001, 313 Pp. + VI, ??35, $49.95 (Hbk). ISBN 0-1-825093-. [REVIEW] Philosophy 78 (2):289-307.
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  43. Brad Hooker (2002). The Collapse of Virtue Ethics. Utilitas 14 (01):22-.
    Virtue ethics is normally taken to be an alternative to consequentialist and Kantian moral theories. I shall discuss what I think is the most interesting version of virtue ethics – Rosalind Hursthouse's. I shall then argue that her version is inadequate in ways that suggest revision in the direction of a kind of rule-consequentialism.
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  44. Brad Hooker (2002). Intuitions and Moral Theorizing. In Phillip Stratton-Lake (ed.), Ethical Intuitionism: Re-Evaluations. Oxford University Press. 76--161.
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  45. Brad Hooker (2002). Review: Singer and His Critics. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (441):122-126.
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  46. Brad Hooker (2002). Singer and His Critics. Mind 111 (441):122-126.
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  47. Brad Hooker (2002). US and Them. The Philosophers' Magazine 18:50-51.
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  48. Brad Hooker (2001). Cudworth and Quinn. Analysis 61 (4):333–335.
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  49. Brad Hooker, Joseph Hamburger, Henry Sidgwick, Jonathan Riley, D. Weinstein, Margaret Olivia Little, Desmond King, F. Gaus, J. J. Kupperman & Dale Jamieson (2001). Dimensions of Equality Dennis McKerlie 263 Imagining Interest Stephen G. Engelmann 289 the Self-Other Asymmetry and Act-Utilitarianism. [REVIEW] Utilitas 13 (3).
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  50. Roger Crisp & Brad Hooker (eds.) (2000). Well-Being and Morality: Essays in Honour of James Griffin. Clarendon Press.
    Does human well-being consist in pleasure, the satisfaction of desires, or some set of goods such as knowledge, friendship, and accomplishment? Does being moral contribute to well-being, and is there a conflict between people's self-interest and the moral demands on them? Are the values of well-being and of morality measurable? Are such values objective? What is the relation between such values and the natural world? And how much can philosophical theory help us in our answers to these and similar questions? (...)
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