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  1. Brad Partridge & Wayne Hall (forthcoming). Repeated Head Injuries in Australia's Collision Sports Highlight Ethical and Evidential Gaps in Concussion Management Policies. Neuroethics:1-7.
    Head injuries (including concussion) are an inherent risk of participating in the major collision sports played in Australia (rugby league, rugby union and Australian Rules football). Protocols introduced by the governing bodies of these sports are ostensibly designed to improve player safety but do not prevent players suffering from repeated concussions. There is evidence that repeated traumatic brain injuries increase the risk of developing a number of long term problems but scientific and popular debates have largely focused on whether there (...)
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  2. Brad Partridge (2014). Dazed and Confused: Sports Medicine, Conflicts of Interest, and Concussion Management. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (1):65-74.
    Professional sports with high rates of concussion have become increasingly concerned about the long-term effects of multiple head injuries. In this context, return-to-play decisions about concussion generate considerable ethical tensions for sports physicians. Team doctors clearly have an obligation to the welfare of their patient (the injured athlete) but they also have an obligation to their employer (the team), whose primary interest is typically success through winning. At times, a team’s interest in winning may not accord with the welfare of (...)
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  3. Bradley Partridge & Wayne Hall (2014). Conflicts of Interest in Recommendations to Use Computerized Neuropsychological Tests to Manage Concussion in Professional Football Codes. Neuroethics 7 (1):63-74.
    Neuroscience research has improved our understanding of the long term consequences of sports-related concussion, but ethical issues related to the prevention and management of concussion are an underdeveloped area of inquiry. This article exposes several examples of conflicts of interest that have arisen and been tolerated in the management of concussion in sport (particularly professional football codes) regarding the use of computerized neuropsychological (NP) tests for diagnosing concussion. Part 1 outlines how the recommendations of a series of global protocols for (...)
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  4. Stephanie Bell, Brad Partridge, Jayne Lucke & Wayne Hall (2013). Australian University Students' Attitudes Towards the Acceptability and Regulation of Pharmaceuticals to Improve Academic Performance. Neuroethics 6 (1):197-205.
    There is currently little empirical information about attitudes towards cognitive enhancement - the use of pharmaceutical drugs to enhance normal brain functioning. It is claimed this behaviour most commonly occurs in students to aid studying. We undertook a qualitative assessment of attitudes towards cognitive enhancement by conducting 19 semi-structured interviews with Australian university students. Most students considered cognitive enhancement to be unacceptable, in part because they believed it to be unethical but there was a lack of consensus on whether it (...)
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  5. Wayne Hall, Brad Partridge & Jayne Lucke (2013). Constraints on Regulatory Options for Putatively Cognitive Enhancing Drugs. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (7):35-37.
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  6. Jayne Lucke & Brad Partridge (2013). Towards a Smart Population: A Public Health Framework for Cognitive Enhancement. Neuroethics 6 (2):419-427.
    This paper presents a novel view of the concept of cognitive enhancement by taking a population health perspective. We propose four main modifiable healthy lifestyle factors for optimal cognitive functioning across the population for which there is evidence of safety and efficacy. These include i) promoting adequate sleep, ii) increasing physical activity, iii) encouraging a healthy diet, including minimising consumption of stimulants, alcohol and other drugs including nicotine, iv) and promoting good mental health. We argue that it is not ethical (...)
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  7. Mike McNamee & Brad Partridge (2013). Concussion in Sports Medicine Ethics: Policy, Epistemic and Ethical Problems. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (10):15 - 17.
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  8. Frederic Gilbert & Bradley J. Partridge (2012). The Need to Tackle Concussion in Australian Football Codes. Medical Journal of Australia 196 (9):561-563.
    Postmortem evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in the brains of American National Football League players who suffered concussions while playing have intensified concerns about the risks of concussion in sport.1 Concussions are frequently sustained by amateur and professional players of Australia’s three most popular football codes (Australian football, rugby league, and rugby union) and, to a lesser extent, other contact sports such as soccer. This raises major concerns about possible long-term neurological damage, cognitive impairment and mental health problems in (...)
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  9. Bradley Partridge (2012). Students and “Smart Drugs”: Prevalence, Attitudes, and Ethics in the Global Context. Asian Bioethics Review 4 (4):310-319.
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  10. Bradley Partridge (2012). Students and" Smart Drugs": Empirical Research Can Shed Light on Enhancement Enthusiasm. Asian Bioethics Review 4 (4):310-319.
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  11. Wayne Hall, Jonathan Finnoff, Jayne Lucke & Brad Partridge (2011). Begging Important Questions About Cognitive Enhancement, Again. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (1):14 - 15.
  12. Brad Partridge (2011). Fairness And Performance-Enhancing Swimsuits AT The 2009 Swimming World Championships: The 'Asterisk' Championships. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 5 (1):63-74.
    The use of polyurethane swimsuits at the 2009 World Aquatics Championships resulted in world records being set for almost all swimming events. This paper explores the implications that the use of these performance-enhancing swimsuits had on fairness in relative and absolute outcomes in swimming. I claim that the use of ?super swimsuits? unfairly influenced relative outcomes within the competition because not all swimmers used, or had access to, the same types of swimsuit (some of which were clearly ?faster? than others). (...)
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  13. Brad Partridge, Jayne Lucke & Wayne Hall (2011). In the Face of Uncertainty About the Risks of Low-Level Drinking, Abstinence Is Prudent, Not Misogynistic, Advice. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (12):66-67.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 12, Page 66-67, December 2011.
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  14. Brad Partridge (2010). Response. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (4):385-386.
    Response Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11673-010-9253-3 Authors Brad Partridge, Program in Professionalism and Bioethics, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street S.W., Rochester, MN 55905, USA Journal Journal of Bioethical Inquiry Online ISSN 1872-4353 Print ISSN 1176-7529.
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  15. Brad Partridge, Wayne Hall, Jayne Lucke, Mair Underwood & Helen Bartlett (2009). Mapping Community Concerns About Radical Extensions of Human Life Expectancy. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (12):4-5.
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  16. Brad Partridge, Mair Underwood, Jayne Lucke, Helen Bartlett & Wayne Hall (2009). Ethical Concerns in the Community About Technologies to Extend Human Life Span. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (12):68-76.
    Debates about the ethical and social implications of research that aims to extend human longevity by intervening in the ageing process have paid little attention to the attitudes of members of the general public. In the absence of empirical evidence, conflicting assumptions have been made about likely public attitudes towards life-extension. In light of recent calls for greater public involvement in such discussions, this target article presents findings from focus groups and individual interviews which investigated whether members of the general (...)
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