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  1. Bradley Wilson (2012). Justice With Mercy. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (1):119-135.
    Crimes such as the mass murder recently committed in Norway provoke the strongest calls for the death penalty. Among ethicists, the morality of capital punishment typically is discussed in terms of whether or not capital punishment can be morally justified, i.e., the question is whether or not capital punishment is ever permissible. However, neither the morality nor immorality of capital punishment has been decisively demonstrated. My argument assumes that capital punishment is permissible in at least some circumstances. I argue that, (...)
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  2. Bradley E. Wilson (1998). Sociobiology, Sex, and Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 29 (1):201-210.
  3. Bradley E. Wilson (1998). Sociobiology, Sex, and Science: Holcomb, HR,(Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 1993), X+ 447 Pp., ISBN 0-7914-1260-1 Paperback. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 29 (1):201-210.
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  4. Bradley E. Wilson (1996). Book Review:Instrumental Biology, or the Disunity of Science Alexander Rosenberg. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 63 (1):139-.
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  5. Bradley E. Wilson (1996). Changing Conceptions of Species. Biology and Philosophy 11 (3):405-420.
    Species are thought by many to be important units of evolution. In this paper, I argue against that view. My argument is based on an examination of the role of species in the synthetic theory of evolution. I argue that if one adopts a gradualist view of evolution, one cannot make sense of the claim that species are units in the minimal sense needed to claim that they are units of evolution, namely, that they exist as discrete entities over time. (...)
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  6. Bradley E. Wilson (1996). Futility and the Obligations of Physicians. Bioethics 10 (1):43–55.
    ABSTRACTIt is becoming increasingly common for doctors to appeal to futility judgments as the basis for certain types of clinical decisions, such as the decision to withhold CPR. The clinical use of futility judgments raises two basic questions regarding futility. First, how is the concept of futility to be understood? Secondly, once we have a clearer understanding of futility, what role should determinations of futility play in clinical decision‐making? Much of the discussion about the concept of futility has centered on (...)
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  7. Bradley E. Wilson (1995). A (Not-so-Radical) Solution to the Species Problem. Biology and Philosophy 10 (3):339-356.
    What are species? One popular answer is that species are individuals. Here I develop another approach to thinking about species, an approach based on the notion of a lineage. A lineage is a sequence of reproducing entities, individuated in terms of its components. I argue that one can conceive of species as groups of lineages, either organism lineages or population lineages. Conceiving of species as groups of lineages resolves the problems that the individual conception of species is supposed to resolve. (...)
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  8. James G. Lennox & Bradley E. Wilson (1994). Natural Selection and the Struggle for Existence. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 25 (1):65-80.
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  9. Bradley E. Wilson (1994). Book Review:Theory Change in Science: Strategies From Mendelian Genetics Lindley Darden. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 61 (1):153-.
  10. Bradley E. Wilson (1991). Are Species Sets? Biology and Philosophy 6 (4):413-431.
    I construe the question Are species sets? as a question about whether species can be conceived of as sets, as the term set is understood by contemporary logicians. The question is distinct from the question Are species classes?: The conception of classes invoked by Hull and others differs from the logician's conception of a set. I argue that species can be conceived of as sets, insofar as one could identify a set with any given species and that identification would satisfy (...)
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