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Bradley L. Herling [4]Bradley Herling [2]
  1. Bradley L. Herling (2012). Schopenhauer and Indian Philosophy: A Dialogue Between India and Germany (Review). Philosophy East and West 62 (2):292-295.
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  2. Bradley Herling (2011). Review of Ian Almond, History of Islam in German Thought: From Leibniz to Nietzsche. [REVIEW] Sophia 50 (4):709-711.
  3. Bradley Herling (2010). Review of Mary-Jane Rubenstein, Strange Wonder : The Closure of Metaphysics and the Opening of Awe. [REVIEW] Sophia 49 (4):635-636.
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  4. Bradley L. Herling (2007). Dan Arnold, Buddhists, Brahmins, and Belief: Epistemology in South Asian Philosophy of Religion , New York: Columbia University Press, 2005, 328 Pp., ISBN: 0-231-13280-8, Hb. [REVIEW] Sophia 46 (1):95-97.
  5. Bradley L. Herling (2006). The German Gītā: Hermeneutics and Discipline in the German Reception of Indian Thought, 1778-1831. Routledge.
    How did the Bhagavadgãtà first become an object of German philosophical and philological inquiry? How were its foundational concepts initially interpreted within German intellectual circles, and what does this episode in the history of cross-cultural encounter teach us about the status of comparative philosophy today? This book addresses these questions through a careful study of the figures who read, translated and interpreted the G?t? around the turn of the nineteenth century in Germany: J.G. Herder, F. Majer, F. Schlegel, A.W. Schlegel, (...)
     
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  6. Bradley L. Herling (2005). The German Gita: Hermeneutics and Discipline in the Early German Reception of Indian Thought. Routledge.
    How did the Bhagavadgãtà first become an object of German philosophical and philological inquiry? How were its foundational concepts initially interpreted within German intellectual circles, and what does this episode in the history of cross-cultural encounter teach us about the status of comparative philosophy today? This book addresses these questions through a careful study of the figures who read, translated and interpreted the Bhagavadgãtà around the turn of the nineteenth century in Germany: J.G. Herder, F. Majer, F. Schlegel, A.W. Schlegel, (...)
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