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  1. Brady Thomas Heiner (unknown). “From the Prison of Slavery to the Slavery of Prison”: Angela Y. Davis's Abolition Democracy. Philosophical Explorations:219-227.
    One of the most radical dimensions of Davis’s critique of American democracy is her exposure of the vestiges of slavery that remain in the contemporary criminal justice system. I discuss this aspect of her critical project, its roots in Du Bois’s critique of Black Reconstruction, and the way that it informs her prison abolitionism and her two-pronged program for the formation of a genuine “abolition democracy.” I conclude by reflecting upon Davis’s reticence about abolition as a constructive enterprise and assessing (...)
     
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  2. Brady Thomas Heiner (2008). Guest Editor's Introduction. Continental Philosophy Review 41 (2):115-126.
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  3. Brady Thomas Heiner & Kyle Powys Whyte (2008). A Proposal for Genetically Modifying the Project of “Naturalizing” Phenomenology. Continental Philosophy Review 41 (2):179-193.
    In this paper, we examine Shaun Gallagher’s project of “naturalizing” phenomenology with the cognitive sciences: front-loaded phenomenology (FLP). While we think it is a productive <span class='Hi'>proposal</span>, we argue that Gallagher does not employ genetic phenomenological methods in his execution of FLP. We show that without such methods, FLP’s attempt to locate neurological correlates of conscious experience is not yet adequate. We demonstrate this by analyzing Gallagher’s critique of cognitive neuropsychologist Christopher Frith’s functional explanation of schizophrenic symptoms. In “constraining” Gallagher’s (...)
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  4. Brady Thomas Heiner (2007). “From the Prison of Slavery to the Slavery of Prison”. Radical Philosophy Today 2007:219-227.
    One of the most radical dimensions of Davis’s critique of American democracy is her exposure of the vestiges of slavery that remain in the contemporary criminal justice system. I discuss this aspect of her critical project, its roots in Du Bois’s critique of Black Reconstruction, and the way that it informs her prison abolitionism and her two-pronged program for the formation of a genuine “abolition democracy.” I conclude by reflecting upon Davis’s reticence about abolition as a constructive enterprise and assessing (...)
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