Search results for 'Brain Damage' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Rocco J. Gennaro & Yonatan I. Fishman (2015). The Argument From Brain Damage Vindicated. In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield 105-133.
    It has long been known that brain damage has important negative effects on one’s mental life and even eliminates one’s ability to have certain conscious experiences. It thus stands to reason that when all of one’s brain activity ceases upon death, consciousness is no longer possible and so neither is an afterlife. It seems clear that human consciousness is dependent upon functioning brains. This essay reviews some of the overall neurological evidence from brain damage studies (...)
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  2.  4
    Richard D. Weiner (1984). Does Electroconvulsive Therapy Cause Brain Damage? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (1):1.
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  3.  21
    Michael Thomas & Annette Karmiloff-Smith (2002). Are Developmental Disorders Like Cases of Adult Brain Damage? Implications From Connectionist Modelling. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):727-750.
    It is often assumed that similar domain-specific behavioural impairments found in cases of adult brain damage and developmental disorders correspond to similar underlying causes, and can serve as convergent evidence for the modular structure of the normal adult cognitive system. We argue that this correspondence is contingent on an unsupported assumption that atypical development can produce selective deficits while the rest of the system develops normally (Residual Normality), and that this assumption tends to bias data collection in the (...)
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  4.  7
    Dahlia W. Zaidel (2007). Overall Intelligence and Localized Brain Damage. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (2):173-174.
    Overall mean performance on intelligence tests by brain-damaged patients with focal lesions can be misleading in regard to localization of intelligence. The widely used WAIS has many subtests that together recruit spatially distant neural but individually the subtests reveal localized functions. Moreover, there are kinds of intelligence that defy the localizationist approach inferred from brain damage.
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  5.  5
    Donald G. Stein & Marylou M. Glasier (1995). Are Fetal Brain Tissue Grafts Necessary for the Treatment of Brain Damage? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):86-107.
    Despite some clinical promise, using fetal transplants for degenerative and traumatic brain injury remains controversial and a number of issues need further attention. This response reexamines a number of questions. Issues addressed include: temporal factors relating to neural grafting, the role of behavioral experience in graft outcome, and the relationship of rebuilding of neural circuitry to functional recovery. Also discussed are organization and type of transplanted tissue, the of transplant viability, and whether transplants are really needed to obtain functional (...)
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  6.  35
    Jaak Panksepp, Thomas Fuchs, Victor Garcia & Adam Lesiak (2007). Does Any Aspect of Mind Survive Brain Damage That Typically Leads to a Persistent Vegetative State? Ethical Considerations. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2 (1):32-.
    Recent neuroscientific evidence brings into question the conclusion that all aspects of consciousness are gone in patients who have descended into a persistent vegetative state (PVS). Here we summarize the evidence from human brain imaging as well as neurological damage in animals and humans suggesting that some form of consciousness can survive brain damage that commonly causes PVS. We also raise the issue that neuroscientific evidence indicates that raw emotional feelings (primary-process affects) can exist without any (...)
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  7.  37
    Olaf Dammann (2007). Perinatal Brain Damage Causation. Developmental Neuroscience 29:280–8.
    The search for causes of perinatal brain damage needs a solid theoretical foundation. Current theory apparently does not offer a unanimously accepted view of what constitutes a cause, and how it can be identified. We discuss nine potential theoretical misconceptions: (1) too narrow a view of what is a cause (causal production vs. facilitation), (2) extrapolating from possibility to fact (potential vs. factual causation), (3) if X, then invariably Y (determinism vs. probabilism), (4) co-occurrence in individuals vs. association (...)
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  8.  21
    Julian Savulescu (2009). Brain Damage and the Moral Significance of Consciousness. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 34 (1):6-26.
    Neuroimaging studies of brain-damaged patients diagnosed as in the vegetative state suggest that the patients might be conscious. This might seem to raise no new ethical questions given that in related disputes both sides agree that evidence for consciousness gives strong reason to preserve life. We question this assumption. We clarify the widely held but obscure principle that consciousness is morally significant. It is hard to apply this principle to difficult cases given that philosophers of mind distinguish between a (...)
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  9.  9
    Anders Rydvall, Niklas Juth, Mikael Sandlund, Magnus Domellöf & Niels Lynøe (2014). To Treat or Not to Treat a Newborn Child with Severe Brain Damage? A Cross-Sectional Study of Physicians’ and the General Population’s Perceptions of Intentions. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (1):81-88.
    Ethical dilemmas are common in the neonatal intensive care setting. The aim of the present study was to investigate the opinions of Swedish physicians and the general public on treatment decisions regarding a newborn with severe brain damage. We used a vignette-based questionnaire which was sent to a random sample of physicians (n = 628) and the general population (n = 585). Respondents were asked to provide answers as to whether it is acceptable to discontinue ventilator treatment, and (...)
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  10.  11
    M. Zimmermann (2012). Narrating Stroke: The Life-Writing and Fiction of Brain Damage. Medical Humanities 38 (2):73-77.
    Cerebro-vascular events are, after neurodegenerative disorders, the most frequent cause of brain damage that leads to the patient's impaired cognitive and/or bodily functioning. While the medico-scientific discourse related to stroke suggests that patients experience a change in identity and self-concept, the present analysis focuses on the patients' personal presentation of their experience to, first, highlight their way of thinking and feeling and, second, contribute to the clinician's actual understanding of the meaning of stroke within the life of each (...)
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  11.  5
    Leonard Frank (1990). Electroshock: Death, Brain Damage, Memory Loss, and Brainwashing. Journal of Mind and Behavior 11 (3-4):498-512.
    Since its introduction in 1938, electroshock, or electroconvulsion therapy , has been one of psychiatry's most controversial procedures. Approximately 100,000 people in the United States undergo ECT yearly, and recent media reports indicate a resurgence of its use. Proponents claim that changes in the technology of ECT administration have greatly reduced the fears and risk formely associated with the procedure. I charge, however that ECT as routinely used today is at least as harmful overall as it was before these changes (...)
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  12. Charles Goodwin (ed.) (2003). Conversation and Brain Damage. Oxford University Press Usa.
    How do people with brain damage communicate? How does the partial or total loss of the ability to speak and use language fluently manifest itself in actual conversation? How are people with brain damage able to expand their cognitive ability through interaction with others - and how do these discursive activities in turn influence cognition? This groundbreaking collection of new articles examines the ways in which aphasia and other neurological deficits lead to language impairments that shape (...)
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  13. Guy Kahane & Julian Savulescu, Brain Damage and the Moral Significance of Consciousness.
    Neuroimaging studies of brain-damaged patients diagnosed as in the vegetative state suggest that the patients might be conscious. This might seem to raise no new ethical questions given that in related disputes both sides agree that evidence for consciousness gives strong reason to preserve life. We question this assumption. We clarify the widely held but obscure principle that consciousness is morally significant. It is hard to apply this principle to difficult cases given that philosophers of mind distinguish between a (...)
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  14.  6
    Peter R. Breggin (1990). Brain Damage, Dementia, and Persistent Cognitive Dysfunction Associated with Neuroleptic Drugs: Evidence, Etiology, Implications. Journal of Mind and Behavior 11 (3):4.
    Several million people are treated with neuroleptic medications in North America each year. A large percentage of these patients develop a chronic neurologic disorder-tardive dyskinesia-characterized by abnormal movements of the voluntary muscles. Most cases are permanent and there is no known treatment. Evidence has been accumulating that the neuroleptics also cause damage to the highest centers of the brain, producing chronic mental dysfunction, tardive dementia and tardive psychosis. These drug effects may be considered a mental equivalent of tardive (...)
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  15.  9
    Rolf Verleger (2003). Double Dissociation in the Effects of Brain Damage on Working Memory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):758-759.
    As revealed by standard neuropsychological testing, patients with damage either to the frontal lobe or to the hippocampus suffer from distinct impairments of working memory. It is unclear how Ruchkin et al.'s model integrates the role played by the hippocampus.
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  16.  7
    H. Branch Coslett & Laurel J. Buxbaum (2004). The Planning–Control Model and Spatio-Motor Deficits Following Brain Damage. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):31-32.
    Glover's planning–control model accommodates a substantial number of findings from subjects who have motor deficits as a consequence of brain lesions. A number of consistently observed and robust findings are not, however, explained by Glover's theory; additionally, the claim that the IPL supports planning whereas the SPL supports control is not consistently supported in the literature.
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  17.  1
    William E. Cooper (1981). The Analytic/Holistic Distinction Applied to the Speech of Patients with Hemispheric Brain Damage. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (1):68.
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  18.  5
    John Marshall & Ian Robertson (eds.) (1993). Unilateral Neglect: Clinical And Experimental Studies (Brain Damage, Behaviour and Cognition). Psychology Press.
    This book covers all aspects of the disorder, from an historical survey of research to date, through the nature and anatomical bases of neglect, and on to review contemporary theories on the subject.
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  19.  4
    Marlene Oscar-Berman (1994). Brain Damage and Cognitive Dysfunction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):678.
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  20.  2
    Dahlia W. Zaidel (1999). Neuronal Connectivity, Regional Differentiation, and Brain Damage in Humans. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):854-855.
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  21.  1
    Peter R. Breggin (1984). Electroshock Therapy and Brain Damage: The Acute Organic Brain Syndrome as Treatment. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (1):24.
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  22.  3
    Yves Rossetti, Sophie Jacquin-Courtois, Marilena Aiello, Masami Ishihara, Claudio Brozzoli & Fabrizio Doricchi (2011). Neglect “Around the Clock”: Dissociating Number and Spatial Neglect in Right Brain Damage. In Stanislas Dehaene & Elizabeth Brannon (eds.), Space, Time and Number in the Brain. Oxford University Press
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  23.  2
    Donald I. Templer (1984). ECT and Brain Damage: How Much Risk is Acceptable? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (1):39.
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  24.  1
    Arthur Cherkin (1984). Possible Brain Damage by Electroconvulsive Therapy: Memory Impairment and Cultural Resistance. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (1):25.
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  25.  1
    Agnete Mouritzen Dam (1984). Brain Damage From Spontaneous but Not From Induced Seizures in Animals. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (1):26.
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  26.  15
    I. Peretz (1998). Music and Emotion: Perceptual Determinants, Immediacy, and Isolation After Brain Damage. Cognition 68 (2):111-141.
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  27.  12
    Catherine Malabou & Steven Miller, The New Wounded, From Neurosis to Brain Damage.
  28.  8
    Martha J. Farah (1994). Visual Perception and Visual Awareness After Brain Damage: A Tutorial Overview. In Carlo Umilta & Morris Moscovitch (eds.), Consciousness and Unconscious Information Processing: Attention and Performance 15. MIT Press 203--236.
  29.  13
    S. Majerus, H. Gill-Thwaites, Kristin Andrews & Steven Laureys (2006). Behavioral Evaluation of Consciousness in Severe Brain Damage. In Steven Laureys (ed.), Boundaries of Consciousness. Elsevier
  30.  5
    Jie Sui, Magdalena Chechlacz & Glyn W. Humphreys (2012). Dividing the Self: Distinct Neural Substrates of Task-Based and Automatic Self-Prioritization After Brain Damage. Cognition 122 (2):150-162.
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  31. Oliver H. Turnbull & Mark Solms (2004). Depth Psychological Consequences of Brain Damage. In Jaak Panksepp (ed.), Textbook of Biological Psychiatry. Wiley-Liss 571.
     
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  32.  44
    Martha J. Farah & Todd E. Feinberg (1997). Consciousness of Perception After Brain Damage. Seminars in Neurology 17:145-52.
  33. Klaus Poeck (1969). Pathophysiology of Emotional Disorders Associated with Brain Damage. In P. Vinken & G. Bruyn (eds.), Handbook of Clinical Neurology. North Holland 3--343.
     
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  34.  28
    Martha J. Farah (1994). Perception and Awareness After Brain Damage. Current Opinion in Neurobiology 4:252-55.
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  35.  4
    Dana Samson & Caroline Michel (2013). Theory of Mind: Insights From Patients with Acquired Brain Damage. In Simon Baron-Cohen, Michael Lombardo & Helen Tager-Flusberg (eds.), Understanding Other Minds: Perspectives From Developmental Social Neuroscience. OUP Oxford 3--1.
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  36.  1
    Barbara A. Wilson (2003). Brain Damage, Treatment and Recovery From. In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group
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  37. Nelleke Bakker (2014). Minimal Brain Damage/Dysfunction En de Ontwikkeling van de Wetenschappelijke Kinderstudie in Nederland, Ca. 1950–1990. Studium 7 (2):82.
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  38. Nadia Bolognini, Debora Casanova, Angelo Maravita & Giuseppe Vallar (2012). Bisecting Real and Fake Body Parts: Effects of Prism Adaptation After Right Brain Damage. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.
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  39. Blank Idan, Rohter Sofia, Kiran Swathi & Fedorenko Evelina (2015). Functional Reorganization of the Large-Scale Brain Networks That Support High-Level Cognition Following Brain Damage in Aphasia. Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  40. T. E. LeVere (1975). Neural Stability, Sparing, and Behavioral Recovery Following Brain Damage. Psychological Review 82 (5):344-358.
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  41. Brian Levine, Tom A. Schweizer, Charlene O'Connor, Gary Turner, Susan Gillingham, Donald T. Stuss, Tom Manly & Ian H. Robertson (2011). Rehabilitation of Executive Functioning in Patients with Frontal Lobe Brain Damage with Goal Management Training. Frontiers Human Neuroscience 5.
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  42. Aleksandr Romanovich Luria, V. L. Naydin, L. S. Tsvetkova & E. N. Vinarskaya (1969). Restoration of Higher Cortical Function Following Local Brain Damage. In P. Vinken & G. Bruyn (eds.), Handbook of Clinical Neurology. North Holland 368-433.
     
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  43. C. Morin, S. Thibierge & M. Perrigot (2001). Right Brain Damage, Body Image, and Language: A Psychoanalytic Perspective. Journal of Mind and Behavior 22 (1):69-89.
    The right hemisphere syndrome refers to various disturbances in patients’ relationships with space and body due to right hemisphere lesions. While the psychological aspects of this syndrome have been discussed at length in the literature, the relevance of the Lacanian psychoanalytic notion of specular image has not yet been considered. The present study is an attempt to evaluate, in a case report, whether the right hemisphere syndrome has subjective coherence regarding the pathology of the specular image. The patient described here (...)
     
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  44. Gilles Rode, Roberta Ronchi, Patrice Revol, Yves Rossetti, Sophie Jacquin-Courtois, Irene Rossi & Giuseppe Vallar (2014). Hyperschematia After Right Brain Damage: A Meaningful Entity? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
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  45. Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (ed.) (2016). Finding Consciousness: The Neuroscience, Ethics, and Law of Severe Brain Damage. Oxford University Press Usa.
    The prominent contributors provide background information, survey the issues and positions, and take controversial stands from a wide variety of perspectives, including neuroscience and neurology, law and policy, and philosophy and ethics.
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  46. P. Vuilleumier (2005). Visual Extinction and Hemispatial Neglect After Brain Damage: Neurophysiological Basis of Residual Processing. In Laurent Itti, Geraint Rees & John K. Tsotsos (eds.), Neurobiology of Attention. Academic Press 351--357.
     
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  47.  29
    Dahlia W. Zaidel (1999). Neuronal Connectivity, Regional Differentiation, and Brain Damage in Humans. Philosophical Explorations 22 (5):854-855.
    When circumscribed brain regions are damaged in humans, highly specific iimpairments in language, memory, problem solving, and cognition are observed. Neurosurgery such as "split brain " or hemispherectomy, for example has shown that encompassing regions, the left and right cerebral hemispheres each control human behavior in unique ways. Observations stretching over 100 years of patients with unilateral focal brain damage have revealed, withouth the theoretical benefits of "cognitive neuroscience" or "cognitive psychology," that human behavior is indeed (...)
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  48.  3
    C. M. Bolin, R. Basha, D. Cox, N. H. Zawia, B. Maloney, D. K. Lahiri & F. Cardozo-Pelaez (2006). Exposure to Lead and the Developmental Origin of Oxidative DNA Damage in the Aging Brain. Faseb J 20:788-90.
    Oxidative damage to DNA has been associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Developmental exposure to lead has been shown to elevate the Alzheimer's disease related beta-amyloid peptide , which is known to generate reactive oxygen species in the aging brain. This study measures the lifetime cerebral 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine levels and the activity of the DNA repair enzyme 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase in rats developmentally exposed to Pb. Oxo8dG was transiently modulated early in life , but was later elevated 20 months after exposure (...)
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  49.  5
    Sandra E. Black (2002). Novel Approaches to the Assessment of Frontal Damage and Executive Deficits in Traumatic Brain Injury. In Donald T. Stuss & Robert T. Knight (eds.), Principles of Frontal Lobe Function. Oxford University Press 448.
  50. Costantino Balestra & Peter Germonpré (2016). Correlation Between Patent Foramen Ovale, Cerebral “Lesions” and Neuropsychometric Testing in Experienced Sports Divers: Does Diving Damage the Brain? Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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