Search results for 'Brain State' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Tuomas Mutanen (2013). TMS-Evoked Changes in Brain-State Dynamics Quantified by Using EEG Data. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 198.0
  2. Guangyu Chen, Hong-Ying Zhang, Chunming Xie, Gang Chen, Zhi-Jun Zhang, Gao-Jun Teng & Shi-Jiang Li (2013). Modular Reorganization of Brain Resting State Networks and its Independent Validation in Alzheimer's Disease Patients. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 192.0
    Previous studies have demonstrated disruption in structural and functional connectivity occurring in the Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). However, it is not known how these disruptions alter brain network reorganization. With the modular analysis method of graph theory, and datasets acquired by the resting-state functional connectivity MRI (R-fMRI) method, we investigated and compared the brain organization patterns between the AD group and the cognitively normal control (CN) group. Our main finding is that the largest homotopic module (defined as the (...)
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  3. D. Papo (2012). Why Should Cognitive Neuroscientists Study the Brain's Resting State? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:45-45.score: 192.0
    Why should cognitive neuroscientists study the brain's resting state?
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  4. Bharat B. Biswal Xin Di, Suril Gohel, Eun H. Kim (2013). Task Vs. Rest—Different Network Configurations Between the Coactivation and the Resting-State Brain Networks. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 192.0
    There is a growing interest in studies of human brain networks using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). However, it is unclear whether and how brain networks measured during the resting-state exhibit comparable properties to brain networks during task performance. In the present study, we investigated meta-analytic coactivation patterns among brain regions based upon published neuroimaging studies, and compared the coactivation network configurations with those in the resting-state network. The strength of resting-state (...)
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  5. Marcel A. J. Van Gerven Ole Jensen, Ali Bahramisharif, Robert Oostenveld, Stefan Klanke, Avgis Hadjipapas, Yuka O. Okazaki (2011). Using Brain–Computer Interfaces and Brain-State Dependent Stimulation as Tools in Cognitive Neuroscience. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 180.0
    Large efforts are currently being made to develop and improve online analysis of brain activity which can be used e.g. for brain-computer interfacing (BCI). A BCI allows a subject to control a device by willfully changing his/her own brain activity. BCI therefore holds the promise as a tool for aiding the disabled and for augmenting human performance. While technical developments obviously are important, we will here argue that new insight gained from cognitive neuroscience can be used to (...)
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  6. Richard Brown (2006). What is a Brain State? Philosophical Psychology 19 (6):729-742.score: 164.0
    Philosophers have been talking about brain states for almost 50 years and as of yet no one has articulated a theoretical account of what one is. In fact this issue has received almost no attention and cognitive scientists still use meaningless phrases like 'C-fiber firing' and 'neuronal activity' when theorizing about the relation of the mind to the brain. To date when theorists do discuss brain states they usually do so in the context of making some other (...)
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  7. Michael N. Marsh (2010). Out-of-Body and Near-Death Experiences: Brain-State Phenomena or Glimpses of Immortality? OUP Oxford.score: 162.0
    Personalised accounts of out-of-body (OBE) and near-death (NDE) experiences are frequently interpreted as offering evidence for immortality and an afterlife. Since most OBE/NDE follow severe curtailments of cerebral circulation with loss of consciousness, the agonal brain supposedly permits 'mind', 'soul' or 'consciousness' to escape neural control and provide glimpses of the afterlife. -/- Michael Marsh critically analyses the work of five key writers who support this so-called "dying brain" hypothesis. He firmly disagrees with such otherworldly 'mystical' or 'psychical' (...)
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  8. Yonghua Cui, Zhen Jin, Xu Chen, Yong He, Xia Liang & Yi Zheng (2013). Abnormal Baseline Brain Activity in Drug-Naïve Patients with Tourette Syndrome: A Resting-State fMRI Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:913.score: 156.0
    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a childhood-onset chronic disorder characterized by the presence of multiple motor and vocal tics. This study investigated spontaneous low-frequency fluctuations in TS patients during resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans. We obtained resting-state fMRI scans from seventeen drug-naïve TS children and fifteen demographically matched healthy children. We computed the amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF) and fractional ALFF (fALFF) of resting-state fMRI data to measure spontaneous brain activity, and assessed the between-group (...)
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  9. Huafu Chen Qing Gao, Qiang Xu, Xujun Duan, Wei Liao, Jurong Ding, Zhiqiang Zhang, Yuan Li, Guangming Lu (2013). Extraversion and Neuroticism Relate to Topological Properties of Resting-State Brain Networks. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 156.0
    With the advent and development of modern neuroimaging techniques, there is an increasing interest in linking extraversion and neuroticism to anatomical and functional brain markers. Here we aimed to test the theoretically derived biological personality model as proposed by Eysenck using graph theoretical analyses. Specifically, the association between the topological organization of whole-brain functional networks and extraversion/neuroticism was explored. To construct functional brain networks, functional connectivity among 90 brain regions was measured by temporal correlation using resting- (...) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data of 71 healthy subjects. Graph theoretical analysis revealed a positive association of extraversion scores and normalized clustering coefficient values. These results suggested a more clustered configuration in brain networks of individuals high in extraversion, which could imply a higher arousal threshold and higher levels of arousal tolerance in the cortex of extraverts. On a local network level, we observed that a specific nodal measure, i.e. betweenness centrality (BC), was positively associated with neuroticism scores in the right precentral gyrus, right caudate nucleus, right olfactory cortex and bilateral amygdala. For individuals high in neuroticism, these results suggested a more frequent participation of these specific regions in information transition within the brain network and, in turn, may partly explain greater regional activation levels and lower arousal thresholds in these regions. In contrast, extraversion scores were positively correlated with BC in the right insula, while negatively correlated with BC in the bilateral middle temporal gyrus, indicating that the relationship between extraversion and regional arousal is not as simple as proposed by Eysenck. (shrink)
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  10. Qing Gao (2013). Erratum: Extraversion and Neuroticism Relate to Topological Properties of Resting-State Brain Networks. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 156.0
    Erratum: Extraversion and neuroticism relate to topological properties of resting-state brain networks.
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  11. Ole Jensen, Ali Bahramisharif, Robert Oostenveld, Stefan Klanke, Avgis Hadjipapas, Yuka O. Okazaki & Marcel Aj van Gerven (2011). Using Brain–Computer Interfaces and Brain-State Dependent Stimulation as Tools in Cognitive Neuroscience. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 150.0
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  12. J. S. Price (1985). Depression: From Psychology to Brain State. By Paul Gilbert. (Lawrence Erlbaum, London, 1984.) $19.95. [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 17 (4):506-507.score: 150.0
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  13. Alireza Gharabaghi, Dominic Kraus, Maria T. LeãO., Martin Spüler, Armin Walter, Martin Bogdan, Wolfgang Rosenstiel, Georgios Naros & Ulf Ziemann (2014). Coupling Brain-Machine Interfaces with Cortical Stimulation for Brain-State Dependent Stimulation: Enhancing Motor Cortex Excitability for Neurorehabilitation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.score: 150.0
  14. Fabien Perrin, Caroline Schnakers, Manuel Schabus, Christian Degueldre, Serge Goldman, Serge Brédart, Marie-Elisabeth E. Faymonville, Maurice Lamy, Gustave Moonen, André Luxen, Pierre Maquet & Steven Laureys (2006). Brain Response to One's Own Name in Vegetative State, Minimally Conscious State, and Locked-in Syndrome. Archives of Neurology 63 (4):562-569.score: 144.0
  15. Lynne Rudder Baker (2001). Are Beliefs Brain States? In Anthonie W. M. Meijers (ed.), Explaining Beliefs. CSLI Publications (Stanford).score: 144.0
    During the past couple of decades, philosophy of mind--with its siblings, philosophy of psychology and cognitive science--has been one of the most exciting areas of philosophy. Yet, in that time, I have come to think that there is a deep flaw in the basic conception of its object of study--a deep flaw in its conception of the so-called propositional attitudes, like belief, desire, and intention. Taking belief as the fundamental propositional attitude, scientifically-minded philosophers hold that beliefs, if there are any, (...)
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  16. Jaak Panksepp, Thomas Fuchs, Victor Garcia & Adam Lesiak (2007). Does Any Aspect of Mind Survive Brain Damage That Typically Leads to a Persistent Vegetative State? Ethical Considerations. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2 (1):32-.score: 144.0
    Recent neuroscientific evidence brings into question the conclusion that all aspects of consciousness are gone in patients who have descended into a persistent vegetative state (PVS). Here we summarize the evidence from human brain imaging as well as neurological damage in animals and humans suggesting that some form of consciousness can survive brain damage that commonly causes PVS. We also raise the issue that neuroscientific evidence indicates that raw emotional feelings (primary-process affects) can exist without any cognitive (...)
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  17. Melanie Boly, Marie-Elisabeth E. Faymonville & Philippe Peigneux (2004). Auditory Processing in Severely Brain Injured Patients: Differences Between the Minimally Conscious State and the Persistent Vegetative State. Archives of Neurology 61 (2):233-238.score: 144.0
  18. Christoph S. Herrmann Toralf Neuling, Stefan Rach (2013). Orchestrating Neuronal Networks: Sustained After-Effects of Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation Depend Upon Brain States. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 136.0
    The interest in transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) has significantly increased in the past decade. It has potential to modulate brain oscillations in a frequency specific manner, offering the possibility to demonstrate a causal nature of oscillation behavior relationships. TACS is a strong candidate as a tool for clinical applications, however, to fulfill this potential, certain parameters have yet to be evaluated. First, little is known about long-lasting after-effects of tACS with respect to the modulations of rhythmic brain (...)
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  19. Dietrich Lehmann & Martha Koukkou (2000). All Brain Work – Including Recall – is State-Dependent. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):964-965.score: 132.0
    The continuous ongoing mentation is experienced as dreams in some functional states. Mentation occurs with high speed, is driven by individual memory, and uses state-dependent processing strategies, context material, storage options, and retrieval access. Retrieval deserves more attention. Multiple state-shifts owing to individual meaning as extracted also during sleep concatenate dream narratives and define access to segments for awake recall. [Hobson et al.; Nielson; Solms].
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  20. Joseph L. Verheijde, Mohamed Y. Rady & Joan L. McGregor (2009). Brain Death, States of Impaired Consciousness, and Physician-Assisted Death for End-of-Life Organ Donation and Transplantation. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (4):409-421.score: 132.0
    In 1968, the Harvard criteria equated irreversible coma and apnea (i.e., brain death) with human death and later, the Uniform Determination of Death Act was enacted permitting organ procurement from heart-beating donors. Since then, clinical studies have defined a spectrum of states of impaired consciousness in human beings: coma, akinetic mutism (locked-in syndrome), minimally conscious state, vegetative state and brain death. In this article, we argue against the validity of the Harvard criteria for equating brain (...)
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  21. José M. Soares, Adriana Sampaio, Paulo Marques, Luís M. Ferreira, Nadine C. Santos, Fernanda Marques, Joana A. Palha, João J. Cerqueira & Nuno Sousa (2013). Plasticity of Resting State Brain Networks in Recovery From Stress. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 132.0
  22. Robert van Gulick (1994). Are Beliefs Brain States? And If They Are What Might That Explain? Philosophical Studies 76 (2-3):205-15.score: 130.0
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  23. Natika Newton (1986). Churchland on Direct Introspection of Brain States. Analysis 46 (March):97-102.score: 130.0
  24. Stephen Williams (1978). Pains, Brain States and Scientific Identities. Mind 87 (January):77-92.score: 130.0
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  25. Louise M. Antony (2001). Brain States with Attitude. In Anthonie W. M. Meijers (ed.), Explaining Beliefs. Csli.score: 130.0
     
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  26. Reinaldo Elugardo (2001). Brain States, Causal Explanation, and the Attitudes. In Explaining Beliefs: Lynne Rudder Baker and Her Critics. Stanford: CSLI Publications.score: 130.0
     
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  27. L. R. Talbot & H. A. Whitaker (1994). Brain-Injured Persons in an Altered State of Consciousness: Measures and Intervention Strategies. Brain Injury 8:689-99.score: 126.0
  28. Scott Vrecko (2010). Birth of a Brain Disease: Science, the State and Addiction Neuropolitics. History of the Human Sciences 23 (4):52-67.score: 126.0
    This article critically interrogates contemporary forms of addiction medicine that are portrayed by policy-makers as providing a ‘rational’ or politically neutral approach to dealing with drug use and related social problems. In particular, it examines the historical origins of the biological facts that are today understood to provide a foundation for contemporary understandings of addiction as a ‘disease of the brain’. Drawing upon classic and contemporary work on ‘styles of thought’, it documents how, in the period between the mid-1960s (...)
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  29. Claude Gottesmann (2000). Each Distinct Type of Mental State is Supported by Specific Brain Functions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):941-943.score: 126.0
    Reflective waking mentation is supported by cortical activating and inhibitory processes. The thought-like mental content of slow wave sleep appears with lower levels of both kinds of influence. During REM sleep, the equation: activation + disinhibition + dopamine may explain the often psychotic-like mode of psychological functioning. [Hobson et al.; Nielsen; Revonsuo; Solms; Vertes & Eastman].
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  30. C. I. J. M. Stuart, Y. Takahashi & H. Umezawa (1979). Mixed-System Brain Dynamics: Neural Memory as a Macroscopic Ordered State. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 9 (3-4):301-327.score: 126.0
    The paper reviews the current situation regarding a new theory of brain dynamics put forward by the authors in an earlier publication. Motivation for the theory is discussed in terms of two issues: the long-standing problem of accounting for the stability and nonlocal properties of memory, and the experimental and theoretical evidence against the classical theory of brain action. It is shown that the new theory provides an explanation and a conceptually unifying framework for phenomena of brain (...)
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  31. Sheng Zhang & Chiang-Shan R. Li (2012). Task-Related, Low-Frequency Task-Residual, and Resting State Activity in the Default Mode Network Brain Regions. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 126.0
    The hypothesis of a default mode network (DMN) of brain function is based on observations of task-independent decreases of brain activity during effort as participants are engaged in tasks in contrast to resting. On the other hand, studies also showed that DMN regions activate rather than deactivate in response to task-related events. Thus, does DMN “deactivate” during effort as compared to resting? We addressed this question with two approaches. First, we examined DMN activities during resting, task residuals, and (...)
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  32. Steven Laureys, Adrian M. Owen & Nicholas D. Schiff (2004). Brain Function in Coma, Vegetative State, and Related Disorders. Lancet Neurology 3:537-546.score: 120.0
  33. Randal A. Koene (2012). Fundamentals of Whole Brain Emulation: State, Transition and Update Representations. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 4 (01):5-21.score: 120.0
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  34. Nicholas D. Schiff (2006). Modeling the Minimally Conscious State: Measurements of Brain Function and Therapeutic Possibilities. In Steven Laureys (ed.), Boundaries of Consciousness. Elsevier.score: 120.0
  35. Georg Northoff (2012). Immanuel Kant's Mind and the Brain's Resting State. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (7):356-359.score: 120.0
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  36. Calder A. J. (2008). Autism Quotient Predicts Variation in Resting State Brain Activity in Normal Individuals. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 120.0
  37. Marinazzo Daniele (2012). How Lesions Change Resting State Functional Connectivity in Rat Brain. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 120.0
  38. Wohlschlaeger A. (2008). Brain Plasticity Identified in Resting State Fluctuations. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 120.0
  39. Herbert G. Grubel (1976). Reflections on the Present State of the Brain Drain and a Suggested Remedy. Minerva 14 (2):209-224.score: 120.0
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  40. Steven Laureys, Marie-Elisabeth E. Faymonville & M. Ferring (2003). Differences in Brain Metabolism Between Patients in Coma, Vegetative State, Minimally Conscious State and Locked-in Syndrome. European Journal of Neurology 10.score: 120.0
  41. Schabus Manuel (2011). Event-Related Brain Activity During Observation of Simple Motor Behaviour in Minimally Conscious State (MCS) Patients. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 120.0
  42. Naumer Marcus (2011). Thalamo- and Baso-Cortical Functional Segregation of Specialized Brain Networks in Active and Resting State: Data-Driven Estimation and Subsequent Validation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 120.0
  43. Malaak Nasser Moussa, Crystal D. Vechlekar, Jonathan H. Burdette, Matt R. Steen, Christina E. Hugenschmidt & Paul J. Laurienti (2011). Changes in Cognitive State Alter Human Functional Brain Networks. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5:83.score: 120.0
  44. Juha Silvanto, Neil Muggleton & Vincent Walsh (2008). State-Dependency in Brain Stimulation Studies of Perception and Cognition. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (12):447-454.score: 120.0
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  45. Tony Writings (1990). Could I Conceive Being a Brain in a Vat? JOHN D. COLLIER This Article Accepts the Premises of Putnam's Notorious Argument That We Could Not Be a Brain in a Vat, and Argues That Even This Allows a Robust (Although Relativistic) Form of Realism. The Strategy is to Distin-Guish Between Our Ability to State a Theory and Our Ability to Conceive The. International Philosophical Quarterly 29 (2).score: 120.0
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  46. Paul M. Churchland (1985). Reduction, Qualia and the Direct Introspection of Brain States. Journal of Philosophy 82 (January):8-28.score: 118.0
  47. David Hunter (2001). Mind-Brain Identity and the Nature of States. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 79 (3):366 – 376.score: 108.0
  48. Martha J. Farah (2008). Neuroethics and the Problem of Other Minds: Implications of Neuroscience for the Moral Status of Brain-Damaged Patients and Nonhuman Animals. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 1 (1):9-18.score: 104.0
    Our ethical obligations to another being depend at least in part on that being’s capacity for a mental life. Our usual approach to inferring the mental state of another is to reason by analogy: If another being behaves as I do in a circumstance that engenders a certain mental state in me, I conclude that it has engendered the same mental state in him or her. Unfortunately, as philosophers have long noted, this analogy is fallible because behavior (...)
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  49. Walter Glannon (2008). Neurostimulation and the Minimally Conscious State. Bioethics 22 (6):337–345.score: 102.0
    Neurostimulation to restore cognitive and physical functions is an innovative and promising technique for treating patients with severe brain injury that has resulted in a minimally conscious state (MCS). The technique may involve electrical stimulation of the central thalamus, which has extensive projections to the cerebral cortex. Yet it is unclear whether an improvement in neurological functions would result in a net benefit for these patients. Quality-of-life measurements would be necessary to determine whether any benefit of neurostimulation outweighed (...)
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  50. Jon B. Eisenberg (2008). Schiavo on the Cutting Edge: Functional Brain Imaging and its Impact on Surrogate End-of-Life Decision-Making. Neuroethics 1 (2):75-83.score: 102.0
    The article addresses the potential impact of functional brain imaging (functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron-emission tomography) on surrogate end-of-life decision-making in light of varying state-law definitions of consciousness, some of which define awareness behaviorally and others functionally. The article concludes that, in light of admonitions by neuroscientists that functional brain imaging cannot yet replace behavioral evaluation to determine the existence of consciousness, state legislatures, courts and drafters of written advance healthcare directives should consider treating behavior, (...)
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