Search results for 'Brain physiology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. W. Russell Brain (1946). The Neurological Approach to the Problem of Perception. Philosophy 21 (July):133-146.score: 540.0
  2. Robert Michael Brain (2008). The Pulse of Modernism: Experimental Physiology and Aesthetic Avant-Gardes Circa 1900. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (3):393-417.score: 360.0
  3. Charles A. Campbell (1953). Philosophy and Brain Physiology. Philosophical Quarterly 3 (January):51-56.score: 198.0
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  4. Alfredo Pereira Jr, Maria AliceOrnellas Pereira & FábioAugusto Furlan (2011). Recent Advances in Brain Physiology and Cognitive Processing. Mens Sana Monographs 9 (1):183.score: 162.0
    The discovery of participation of astrocytes as active elements in glutamatergic tripartite synapses (composed by functional units of two neurons and one astrocyte) has led to the construction of models of cognitive functioning in the human brain, focusing on associative learning, sensory integration, conscious processing and memory formation/retrieval. We have modelled human cognitive functions by means of an ensemble of functional units (tripartite synapses) connected by gap junctions that link distributed astrocytes, allowing the formation of intra- and intercellular calcium (...)
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  5. John Thomas Wilke (1981). Personal Identity in the Light of Brain Physiology and Cognitive Psychology. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 6 (3):323-334.score: 156.0
    The concept of the person, and the notion that the latter is an entity separate and distinct from other persons, has persisted as one of the more secure ‘givens’ of philosophical thought. We have very little difficulty, in observer language, in pointing to a person, describing his or her attributes, distinguishing him or her from other persons, etc. Likewise, it is ordinarily not much of a problem to subjectively experience, both sensorially and conceptually, the self – that is, to distinguish (...)
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  6. R. Näätänen (1985). Brain Physiology and the Unconscious Initiation of Movements. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (4):549.score: 156.0
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  7. Irving Thalberg (1970). New Light on Brain Physiology and Free Will? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 21 (4):379-383.score: 150.0
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  8. Arnold Van den Hooff (forthcoming). Reflections on Pascal's Two Types of Esprit in the Light of Certain Current Insights Into Brain Physiology. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine.score: 150.0
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  9. Pereira Alfredo Jr, M. A. Pereira & Fábio Augusto Furlan (2011). Recent Advances in Brain Physiology and Cognitive Processing. Mens Sana Monographs 9 (1):183-192.score: 150.0
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  10. Paul F. Brain (1979). Dividing Up Aggression and Considerations in Studying the Physiological Substrates of These Phenomena. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):216.score: 140.0
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  11. António M. Fernandes, Kandice Fero, Wolfgang Driever & Harold A. Burgess (2013). Enlightening the Brain: Linking Deep Brain Photoreception with Behavior and Physiology. Bioessays 35 (9):775-779.score: 132.0
  12. C. Cobb (1955). Awareness, Attention, and Physiology of the Brain Stem. In P. Hoch & J. Zubin (eds.), Experimental Psychopathology. Grune & Stratton.score: 120.0
  13. Bernard J. Baars (1999). Attention Vs Consciousness in the Visual Brain: Differences in Conception, Phenomenology, Behavior, Neuroanatomy, and Physiology. Journal of General Psychology 126:224-33.score: 120.0
  14. Nima Bassiri (2013). The Brain and the Unconscious Soul in Eighteenth-Century Nervous Physiology: Robert Whytt's Sensorium Commune. Journal of the History of Ideas 74 (3):425-448.score: 120.0
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  15. C. W. Usher (1957). Battle for the Mind: A Physiology of Conversion and Brain-Washing. The Eugenics Review 49 (3):147.score: 120.0
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  16. Paul L. Nunez (2010). Brain, Mind, and the Structure of Reality. Oxford University Press.score: 96.0
    Many faces of consciousness -- Ethics, religion, and the identity of self -- States of mind -- Why hearts don't love and brains don't pump -- EEG : a window on the mind -- Dynamic patterns as shadows of thought -- Networks, waves, and resonant binding -- The limits of science : What do we really know? -- Modern physics, cosmology, and consciousness -- The weird behavior of quantum systems -- Ontological interpretations of quantum mechanics -- Does the brain (...)
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  17. Bernard Korzeniewski (2010). From Neurons to Self-Consciousness: How the Brain Generates the Mind. Humanity Books.score: 96.0
    The main idea -- The functioning of a neuron -- Brain structure and function -- The general structure of the neural network -- Instincts, emotions, free will -- The nature of mental objects -- The rise and essence of (self-)consciousness -- Artificial intelligence -- Cognitive limitations of man.
     
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  18. David A. Oakley (ed.) (1985). Brain and Mind. Methuen.score: 90.0
  19. Dean Falk (1990). Brain Evolution in Homo: The “Radiator” Theory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (2):333-344.score: 84.0
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  20. Arturo Rosenblueth (1970). Mind And Brain: A Philosophy Of Science. Cambridge: Mit Press.score: 78.0
  21. Rahul Banerjee & B. K. Chakrabarti (eds.) (2008). Models of Brain and Mind: Physical, Computational, and Psychological Approaches. Elsevier.score: 78.0
    The phenomenon of consciousness has always been a central question for philosophers and scientists. Emerging in the past decade are new approaches to the understanding of consciousness in a scientific light. This book presents a series of essays by leading thinkers giving an account of the current ideas prevalent in the scientific study of consciousness. The value of the book lies in the discussion of this interesting though complex subject from different points of view ranging from physics, computer science to (...)
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  22. F. N. L. Poynter (ed.) (1958). The History And Philosophy Of Knowledge Of The Brain And Its Functions. Blackwell.score: 78.0
     
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  23. J. Allan Hobson, Edward F. Pace-Schott & Robert Stickgold (2003). Dreaming and the Brain: Toward a Cognitive Neuroscience of Conscious States. In Edward F. Pace-Schott, Mark Solms, Mark Blagrove & Stevan Harnad (eds.), Sleep and Dreaming: Scientific Advances and Reconsiderations. Cambridge University Press. 793-842.score: 72.0
    Sleep researchers in different disciplines disagree about how fully dreaming can be explained in terms of brain physiology. Debate has focused on whether REM sleep dreaming is qualitatively different from nonREM (NREM) sleep and waking. A review of psychophysiological studies shows clear quantitative differences between REM and NREM mentation and between REM and waking mentation. Recent neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies also differentiate REM, NREM, and waking in features with phenomenological implications. Both evidence and theory suggest that there are (...)
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  24. J. Allan Hobson, Edward F. Pace-Schott & Robert Stickgold (2000). Dreaming and the Brain: Toward a Cognitive Neuroscience of Conscious States. Behavioral And Brain Sciences 23 (6):793-842; 904-1018; 1083-1121.score: 66.0
    Sleep researchers in different disciplines disagree about how fully dreaming can be explained in terms of brain physiology. Debate has focused on whether REM sleep dreaming is qualitatively different from nonREM (NREM) sleep and waking. A review of psychophysiological studies shows clear quantitative differences between REM and NREM mentation and between REM and waking mentation. Recent neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies also differentiate REM, NREM, and waking in features with phenomenological implications. Both evidence and theory suggest that there are (...)
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  25. Silvia A. Bunge & Jonathan D. Wallis (eds.) (2008). Neuroscience of Rule-Guided Behavior. Oxford University Press.score: 66.0
    euroscience of Rule-Guided Behavior brings together, for the first time, the experiments and theories that have created the new science of rules. Rules are central to human behavior, but until now the field of neuroscience lacked a synthetic approach to understanding them. How are rules learned, retrieved from memory, maintained in consciousness and implemented? How are they used to solve problems and select among actions and activities? How are the various levels of rules represented in the brain, ranging from (...)
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  26. A. Berthoz (2008). The Physiology and Phenomenology of Action. Oxford University Press.score: 66.0
    Though many philosophers of mind have taken an interest in the great developments in the brain sciences, the interest is seldom reciprocated by scientists, who frequently ignore the contributions philosophers have made to our understanding of the mind and brain. In a rare collaboration, a world famous brain scientist and an eminent philosopher have joined forces in an effort to understand how our brain interacts with the world. Does the brain behave as a calculator, combining (...)
     
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  27. Hiroshi Fukuda Kai Wu, Yasuyuki Taki, Kazunori Sato, Haochen Qi, Ryuta Kawashima (2013). A Longitudinal Study of Structural Brain Network Changes with Normal Aging. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 66.0
    The aim of this study was to investigate age-related changes in the topological organization of structural brain networks by applying a longitudinal design over 6 years. Structural brain networks were derived from measurements of regional gray matter volume and were constructed in age-specific groups from baseline and follow-up scans. The structural brain networks showed economical small-world properties, providing high global and local efficiency for parallel information processing at low connection costs. In the analysis of the global network (...)
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  28. James E. Swain, Suzanne C. Perkins, Carolyn J. Dayton, Eric D. Finegood & S. Shaun Ho (2012). Parental Brain and Socioeconomic Epigenetic Effects in Human Development. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (5):378-379.score: 66.0
    Critically significant parental effects in behavioral genetics may be partly understood as a consequence of maternal brain structure and function of caregiving systems recently studied in humans as well as rodents. Key parental brain areas regulate emotions, motivation/reward, and decision making, as well as more complex social-cognitive circuits. Additional key environmental factors must include socioeconomic status and paternal brain physiology. These have implications for developmental and evolutionary biology as well as public policy.
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  29. Barbara E. Jones (2000). The Interpretation of Physiology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):955-956.score: 60.0
    Not at all self-evident, the so-called isomorphisms between the phenomenology and physiology of dreams have been interpreted by Hobson et al. in an arbitrary manner to state that dreams are stimulated by chaotic brainstem stimulation (an assumption also adopted by Vertes & Eastman). I argue that this stimulation is not chaotic at all; nor does it occur in the absence of control from the cerebral cortex, which contributes complexity to brainstem activity as well as meaningful information worth consolidating in (...)
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  30. Opher Donchin & Amir Raz (2004). Where in the Brain Does the Forward Model Lurk? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):402-403.score: 60.0
    The general applicability of forward models in brain function has previously been recognized. Grush's contribution centers largely on broadening the extent and scope of forward models. However, in his effort to expand and generalize, important distinctions may have been overlooked. A better grounding in the underlying physiology would have helped to illuminate such valuable differences and similarities.
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  31. Simeon Locke (2008). Consciousness, Self-Consciousness, and the Science of Being Human. Praeger.score: 60.0
    In the beginning: introduction -- This I believe: preview -- This they believe: other views -- Where it begins: anatomy and environment -- Where it began: evolution -- What is it?: consciousness -- There was the word: self-consciousness and language -- See here: attention -- Perhaps to dream: sleep -- x=2y: representation -- The dance of life: movement -- They all fall down: dissolution of function -- Been there, done that: experience -- Which have eyes and see not: stimulus hierarchy (...)
     
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  32. T. Forcht Dagi & Rebecca Kaufman (2001). Clarifying the Discussion on Brain Death. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (5):503 – 525.score: 54.0
    Definitions of death are based on subjective standards, priorities, and social conventions rather than on objective facts about the state of human physiology. It is the meaning assigned to the facts that determines whensomeone may be deemed to have died, not the facts themselves. Even though subjective standards for the diagnosis of death show remarkable consistency across communities, they are extrinsic. They are driven, implicitly or explicitly, by ideas about what benefits the community rather than what benefits the indidvidual. (...)
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  33. Serge Goldman, Brain Imaging.score: 54.0
    While philosophers have, for centuries, pondered upon the relation between mind and brain, neuroscientists have only recently been able to explore the connection analytically — to peer inside the black box. This ability stems from recent advances in technology and emerging neuroimaging modalities. It is now possible not only to produce remarkably detailed images of the brain’s structure (i.e. anatomical imaging) but also to capture images of the physiology associated with mental processes (i.e. functional imaging). We are (...)
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  34. A. Smith (1986). Brain-Mind Philosophy. Inquiry 29 (June):203-15.score: 54.0
    The remarkable advances in continuing elucidation of the anatomy, physiology, and pathology of the central nervous system in recent experimental animal and clinical studies have provided new contexts for evaluating earlier historical and current controversies on human brain?structure?function and brain?mind relationships. Churchland's Neurophilosophy reviews and critically evaluates the implications of the recent advances in the various neurosciences for formulation of a comprehensive concept of the nature of the mind and the historical controversies on human structure?function and (...)?mind relationships. Although uneven, it is a monumental effort and a remarkable achievement that will provide new, broader, and deeper contexts for philosophers as well as for those engaged in the various neurosciences. (shrink)
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  35. Sean Spence (2009). The Actor's Brain: Exploring the Cognitive Neuroscience of Free Will. OUP Oxford.score: 54.0
    Is free will just an illusion? What is it within the brain that allows us to pursue our own actions and objectives? What is it about this organ that permits the emergence of seemingly purposeful behaviour, giving us the impression that we are 'free'? This book takes a journey through the anatomy and physiology, the structures and processes, of the human brain to demonstrate what is known about the control of voluntary behaviour, when it is 'normal' and (...)
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  36. Stephen Biggs (2007). The Phenomenal Mindreader: A Case for Phenomenal Simulation. Philosophical Psychology 20 (1):29-42.score: 48.0
    This paper specifies two hypotheses that are intimated in recent research on empathy and mindreading. The first, the phenomenal simulation hypothesis, holds that those attributing mental states (i.e., mindreaders) sometimes simulate the phenomenal states of those to whom they are making attributions (i.e., targets). The second, the phenomenal mindreading hypothesis, holds that this phenomenal simulation plays an important role in some mental state attributions. After explicating these hypotheses, the paper focuses on the first. It argues that neuropsychological experiments on empathy (...)
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  37. J. R. Smythies (1956). Analysis Of Perception. London,: Routledge &Amp; K Paul,.score: 48.0
    Routledge is now re-issuing this prestigious series of 204 volumes originally published between 1910 and 1965.
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  38. Peter Bieri (1995). Why is Consciousness Puzzling? In Thomas Metzinger (ed.), Conscious Experience. Ferdinand Schoningh. 45--60.score: 48.0
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  39. Erik Gotlind (1958). Three Theories Of Emotion: Some Views On Philosophical Method. Lund,: Gleerup.score: 48.0
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  40. Russ McBride (2012). A Framework for Error Correction Under Prediction. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 48.0
    A Framework for Error Correction Under Prediction.
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  41. Daniel Becquemont (2007). Les réticences de Bain face à la théorie des localisations cérébrales de Jackson et de Ferrier. Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 2:303-325.score: 48.0
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  42. Philip R. Lee (ed.) (1976/1977). Symposium On Consciousness, Presented At The Annual Meeting Of The American Association For The Advancement Of Science, 1974. Viking Press.score: 48.0
  43. E. V. Sharova (2005). Electrographic Correlates of Brain Reactions to Afferent Stimuli in Postcomatose Unconscious States After Severe Brain Injury. Human Physiology 31 (3):245-254.score: 48.0
     
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  44. Mario von Cranach (1976). Methods Of Inference From Animal To Human Behaviour. The Hague: Mouton.score: 48.0
     
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  45. Andreas Keil & Thomas Elbert (2000). Physiological Units and Behavioral Elements: Dynamic Brains Relate to Dynamic Behavior. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (3):406-407.score: 44.0
    Nunez is to be applauded for putting forward a theoretical brain model. In order to improve any model it needs to be experimentally testable. The model presented in the target article suffers from insufficient clarity as to how new experimental designs could be derived. This is a consequence of neglecting the purpose of the brain, which is to produce effective and adaptive behavior. It might be possible to overcome this drawback by including Hebb-based modeling.
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  46. Roger Whitehead & Scott D. Schliebner (2001). Arousal: Conscious Experience and Brain Mechanisms. In Peter G. Grossenbacher (ed.), Finding Consciousness in the Brain: A Neurocognitive Approach. John Benjamins. 187-220.score: 44.0
  47. John Bricke (1975). Interaction and Physiology. Mind 84 (April):255-9.score: 42.0
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  48. C. Pallis (1983). Whole-Brain Death Reconsidered--Physiological Facts and Philosophy. Journal of Medical Ethics 9 (1):32-37.score: 42.0
    Four main areas generating confusion in discussion on brain death are identified as a) the relation of criteria of death to concepts of death, b) the argument about whether death is an event or a process, c) the inadequate differentiation of different neurological entities having different cardiac prognoses, and d) insufficient awareness of the separate issues of 'determining death' and 'allowing to die'. It is argued that if by death we mean the dissolution of the human 'organism as a (...)
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  49. Katja Guenther (2013). The Disappearing Lesion: Sigmund Freud, Sensory-Motor Physiology, and the Beginnings of Psychoanalysis. Modern Intellectual History 10 (3):569-601.score: 42.0
    Freud's criticism of the localization project as carried out by Theodor Meynert and Carl Wernicke has usually been seen as marking his break with contemporaneous brain science. In this article, however, I show that Freud criticized localization not by turning his back on brain science, but rather by radicalizing some of its principles. In particular, he argued that the physiological pretensions of the localization project remained at odds with its uncritical importation of psychological categories. Further, by avoiding a (...)
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  50. H. M. Hubey (1997). Logic, Physics, Physiology, and Topology of Color. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):191-194.score: 42.0
    This commentary starts with a simplified Cartesian vector space of the tristimulus theory of color. This vector space is then further simplified so that bitstrings are used to represent the vector space. The Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) diagram is shown to follow directly and simply from this vector space. The Berlin & Kay results are shown to agree quite well with the vector space and the two-dimensional version of it, especially if the dimensions are normalized to take into account (...)
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