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Profile: Brandon Warmke (University of Arizona)
  1. Travis J. Rodgers & Brandon Warmke (forthcoming). Situationism Versus Situationism. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-18.
    Most discussions of John Doris’s situationism center on what can be called descriptive situationism, the claim that our folk usage of global personality and character traits in describing and predicting human behavior is empirically unsupported. Philosophers have not yet paid much attention to another central claim of situationism, which says that given that local traits are empirically supported, we can more successfully act in line with our moral values if, in our deliberation about what to do, we focus on our (...)
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  2. Brandon Warmke (forthcoming). The Economic Model of Forgiveness. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly.
    It is sometimes claimed that forgiveness involves the cancellation of a moral debt. This way of speaking about forgiveness exploits an analogy between moral forgiveness and economic debt-cancellation. Call the view that moral forgiveness is like economic debt-cancellation the Economic Model of Forgiveness. In this paper I articulate and motivate the model, defend it against some recent objections, and pose a new puzzle for this way of thinking about forgiveness.
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  3. Brandon Warmke (2013). Two Arguments Against the Punishment-Forbearance Account of Forgiveness. Philosophical Studies 165 (3):915-920.
    One account of forgiveness claims that to forgive is to forbear punishment. Call this the Punishment-Forbearance Account of forgiveness. In this paper I argue that forbearing punishment is neither necessary nor sufficient for forgiveness.
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  4. Brandon Warmke & Michael McKenna (2013). Moral Responsibility, Forgiveness, and Conversation. In Ishtiyaque Haji Justin Caouette (ed.), Free Will and Moral Responsibility. Cambridge Scholars Publishing. 189-2-11.
    In this paper, we explore how a conversational theory of moral responsibility can provide illuminating resources for building a theory about the nature and norms of moral forgiveness.
     
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  5. Brandon Warmke (2011). Is Forgiveness the Deliberate Refusal to Punish? Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (4):613-620.
    In his paper, “The Paradox of Forgiveness“ (this Journal 6 (2009), p. 365-393), Leo Zaibert defends the novel and interesting claim that to forgive is deliberately to refuse to punish. I argue that this is mistaken.
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  6. Brandon Warmke (2011). Moral Responsibility Invariantism. Philosophia 39 (1):179-200.
    Moral responsibility invariantism is the view that there is a single set of conditions for being morally responsible for an action (or omission or consequence of an act or omission) that applies in all cases. I defend this view against some recent arguments by Joshua Knobe and John Doris.
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  7. Brandon Warmke (2010). Artifact and Essence. Philosophia 38 (3):595-614.
    An essential property is a property that an object possesses in every possible world in which that object exists. An individual essence is a property (or set of properties) that an object possesses in every world in which that object exists, and that no other object possesses in any possible world. Call the claim that some artifacts possess an individual essence ‘artifactual essentialism’. I will argue that artifactual essentialism is true.
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  8. Brandon Warmke (2010). Bending the Rules: Morality in the Modern World From Relationships to Politics and War. Philosophical Psychology 23 (1):129-132.
  9. Brandon Warmke (2010). Review of Robert A. Hinde, Bending the Rules (OUP, 2007). [REVIEW] Philosophical Psychology 23 (1):129-132.