Search results for 'Brave New World, Huxley' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Corey Abel (2003). Love and Friendship in Utopia: Brave New World and 1984. In Eduardo Velasquez (ed.), Love and Friendship: Rethinking Politics and Affection in Modern Times.score: 1110.0
    Contrary to many "political" interpretations, of "Brave New World" and "1984" this paper stresses that the evil of totalitarian government is not simply in the presence of great and arbitrary power, but in the particular ways that such power erodes love and friendship, the bases of social life. The crisis represented by the destruction of all possibility of love and friendship is placed in the context of Dostoevsky's meditations on "The Grand Inquisitor," and reflections by noted political theorists on (...)
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  2. Mark S. Frankel (2003). Inheritable Genetic Modification and a Brave New World: Did Huxley Have It Wrong? Hastings Center Report 33 (2):31-36.score: 1005.0
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  3. M. Schermer (2007). Brave New World Versus Island -- Utopian and Dystopian Views on Psychopharmacology. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (2):119-128.score: 810.0
    Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World is a famous dystopia, frequently called upon in public discussions about new biotechnology. It is less well known that 30 years later Huxley also wrote a utopian novel, called Island. This paper will discuss both novels focussing especially on the role of psychopharmacological substances. If we see fiction as a way of imagining what the world could look like, then what can we learn from Huxley’s novels about psychopharmacology and how does (...)
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  4. Bernard M. Daly, Transhumanism: Toward a Brave New World?score: 786.0
    The conference did not target only the U.S. Christian right for opposing such things as stem cell research. It challenged every faith community that believes a human being is more than just one more biological product. The weekend of Aug. 7 was organized by the World Transhumanist Association. In 2005 its conference will be in Caracas, Venezuela, where this small band of transhumanists will continue to challenge all larger faith communities to review what they have to say about a " (...) new world" that would carry us far beyond the engineered manipulations that seemed so distant when Aldous Huxley wrote in 1932 about creating babies in test tubes. (shrink)
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  5. Brian Smith (2012). Haec Fabula Docet: Anti-Essentialism and Freedom in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World1. Philosophy and Literature 35 (2):348-359.score: 771.0
    When Huxley quotes the famous Jefferson line in Brave New World Revisited—"If a nation expects to be ignorant and free . . . it expects what never was and never will be"2—there is something, on the face, humorously explicit to it. The state of civilization the brave new world is in seems to speak directly to this point. Brave new worlders are ignorant and conspicuously not free; they "[like] what [they've] got to do"3 because they have (...)
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  6. Huxley (2006). Brave New World. In Thomas L. Cooksey (ed.), Masterpieces of Philosophical Literature. Greenwood Press.score: 597.0
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  7. J. S. Huxley (1927). Social Life in the Animal World. By Professor Fr. Alverdes Ph.D., Translated by F. C. Creasy. (London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner and Co. 1927. Pp. Ix + 216. Price 10s. 6d.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 2 (08):575-.score: 360.0
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  8. Aldous Huxley (1945/2004). The Perennial Philosophy. Perennial Classics.score: 300.0
    The Perennial Philosophy is defined by its author as "The metaphysic that recognizes a divine Reality substantial to the world of things and lives and minds." With great wit and stunning intellect, Aldous Huxley examines the spiritual beliefs of various religious traditions and explains them in terms that are personally meaningful.
     
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  9. Richard A. Posner (2000). Orwell Versus Huxley: Economics, Technology, Privacy, and Satire. Philosophy and Literature 24 (1):1-33.score: 261.0
    Orwell's novel Nineteen Eighty-Four and Huxley's novel Brave New World have often been thought prophetic commentaries on economic, political, and social matters. I argue, with particular reference to the supposed applicability of these novels to issues of technology and privacy, that the novels are best understood as literary works of art, rather than as social science or commentary, and that when so viewed Orwell's novel in particular reflects a dissatisfaction with everyday life and a nostalgia for Romantic values.
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  10. William M. Curtis (2011). Rorty's Liberal Utopia and Huxley's Island. Philosophy and Literature 35 (1):91-103.score: 261.0
    Eschewing conventional candidates, like Plato's Republic or Machiavelli's Prince, Richard Rorty praises Aldous Huxley's Brave New World as "the best introduction to political philosophy," because it shows us "what sort of human future would be produced by a naturalism untempered by historicist Romanticism, and by a politics aimed merely at alleviating mammalian pain."1 Huxley's celebrated dystopia is thus a poignant warning to our modern utilitarian political projects. Yet Rorty also suggests that utopian literature can play a positive (...)
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  11. Theodor W. Adorno (1983). Prisms. The Mit Press.score: 201.0
    The eminent critic and scholar analyzes a wide range of topics, including Aldous Huxley's Brave New World, jazz, the music of Bach, and museums.
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  12. P. A. Tabensky (2009). What's Wrong with Walden Two? South African Journal of Philosophy 28 (1).score: 201.0
    Despite being eminently forgettable from the literary point of view, B. F. Skinner’s novel, Walden Two , provides us with an excellent opportunity, not so much to show what is wrong with mainstream accounts of free will, as Robert Kane thinks, but rather to explore another key and importantly neglected condition for genuine agency; namely, that properly lived human lives are those that are and must continue to be vulnerable to unforseable reversals, as Aldous Huxley speculates in his (...) New World . In short, I argue, perhaps scandalously, that one of the central conditions for genuine agency is that our lives are and must continue to be, to a large extent, out of our personal control. The promise of too much personal control, not too little (as Kane thinks), is what is wrong with Skinner’s social utopia. (shrink)
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  13. Peter Augustine Lawler (2005). Stuck with Virtue: The American Individual and Our Biotechnological Future. Isi Books.score: 201.0
    Cloning, gene therapy, stem-cell harvesting—are we on the path to a Huxley-like Brave New World? Not really, argues political philosopher and Kass Commission member Peter Augustine Lawler in Stuck with Virtue: The American Individual and Our Biotechnological Future, even as he admits that we will likely become more obsessive and anxious and will be subjected to new forms of tyranny. Rather, he contends, human nature is such that the biotechnological world to come, despite the best efforts of its (...)
     
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  14. Russ Shafer-Landau (ed.) (2010). The Ethical Life: Fundamental Readings in Ethics and Moral Problems. Oxford University Press.score: 201.0
    Introduction -- Value theory : the nature of the good life -- Epicurus letter to Menoeceus -- John Stuart Mill, Hedonism -- Aldous Huxley, Brave new world -- Robert Nozick, The experience machine -- Richard Taylor, The meaning of life -- Jean Kazez, Necessities -- Normative ethics : theories of right conduct -- J.J.C. Smart, Eextreme and restricted utilitarianism -- Immanuel Kant the good will & the categorical imperative -- Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan -- Philippa Foot, Natural goodness -- (...)
     
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  15. Peter Singer (1996). Rethinking Life and Death: The Collapse of Our Traditional Ethics. St. Martin's Griffin.score: 201.0
    The new commandments according to Rethinking Life and Death . --If you must take human life, take responsibility for the consequences of your decisions. --All human life is not of equal worth treat beings in accordance to the ethical situation at hand. --Respect a person's desire to live or die. A profound and provocative work, Rethinking Life and Death , in the tradition of Aldous Huxley's Brave New World , examines the ethical dilemmas that confront us as we (...)
     
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  16. A. F. Giles (1936). A Short History of Greece David M. Robinson: A Short History of Greece. Pp. Xii + 227, 1 Photo, 2 Maps. New York: Huxley House, 1936. Cloth, $3. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 50 (06):229-230.score: 135.0
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  17. Sherrie L. Lyons (1993). Thomas Huxley: Fossils, Persistence, and the Argument From Design. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 26 (3):545 - 569.score: 126.0
    In struggling to free science from theological implications, Huxley let his own philosophical beliefs influence his interpretation of the data. However, he was certainly not unique in this respect. Like the creationists he despised, he made many important contributions to the issue of progression in the fossil record and its relationship to evolutionary theory. Certainly other factors were involved as well. Undoubtedly, just the sheer inertia of ideas played a role. He was committed to a theory of type and (...)
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  18. Thomas H. Huxley, The Origin of Species.score: 120.0
    h e Darwinian hypothesis has the merit of being eminently simple and comprehensible in principle, and its essential positions may be stated in a very few words: all species have been produced by the development of varieties from common stocks; by the conversion of these, first into permanent races and then into new species, by the process of natural selection , which process is essentially identical with that artificial selection by which man has originated the races of domestic animals—the struggle (...)
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  19. John C. Greene (1990). The Interaction of Science and World View in Sir Julian Huxley's Evolutionary Biology. Journal of the History of Biology 23 (1):39 - 55.score: 120.0
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  20. Paul T. Phillips (2007). One World, One Faith: The Quest for Unity in Julian Huxley's Religion of Evolutionary Humanism. Journal of the History of Ideas 68 (4):613-633.score: 120.0
  21. Paul White (2004). Desmond/Huxley: The Hot-Blooded Historian Although His World View Ultimately Sank Into Orthodoxy, He Never Lost His Love of Battle. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 35 (1):191-198.score: 120.0
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  22. Paul White (2004). Desmond/< I> Huxley_: The Hot-Blooded Historian Although His World View Ultimately Sank Into Orthodoxy, He Never Lost His Love of Battle.: Huxley: From Devil's Disciple to Evolution's High Priest Adrian Desmond; Penguin, London, 1998, Pp. Xxii+ 820, Price£ 10.99 Paperback, ISBN 0-14-017309-9. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 35 (1):191-198.score: 120.0
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  23. Fritz Allhoff (2003). Evolutionary Ethics From Darwin to Moore. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 25 (1):51 - 79.score: 85.5
    Evolutionary ethics has a long history, dating all the way back to Charles Darwin.1 Almost immediately after the publication of the Origin, an immense interest arose in the moral implications of Darwinism and whether the truth of Darwinism would undermine traditional ethics. Though the biological thesis was certainly exciting, nobody suspected that the impact of the Origin would be confined to the scientific arena. As one historian wrote, 'whether or not ancient populations of armadillos were transformed into the species that (...)
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  24. Peter J. Bowler (2001). Reconciling Science and Religion: THE DEBATE IN EARLY-TWENTIETH-CENTURY BRITAIN. University of Chicago Press.score: 81.0
    Although much has been written about the vigorous debates over science and religion in the Victorian era, little attention has been paid to their continuing importance in early twentieth-century Britain. Reconciling Science and Religion provides a comprehensive survey of the interplay between British science and religion from the late nineteenth century to World War II. Peter J. Bowler argues that unlike the United States, where a strong fundamentalist opposition to evolutionism developed in the 1920s (most famously expressed in the Scopes (...)
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  25. Edward J. Larson (2004). Evolution: The Remarkable History of a Scientific Theory. Modern Library.score: 81.0
    “I often said before starting, that I had no doubt I should frequently repent of the whole undertaking.” So wrote Charles Darwin aboard The Beagle , bound for the Galapagos Islands and what would arguably become the greatest and most controversial discovery in scientific history. But the theory of evolution did not spring full-blown from the head of Darwin. Since the dawn of humanity, priests, philosophers, and scientists have debated the origin and development of life on earth, and with modern (...)
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  26. Marsha L. Richmond (2000). T. H. Huxley's Criticism of German Cell Theory: An Epigenetic and Physiological Interpretation of Cell Structure. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 33 (2):247 - 289.score: 66.0
    In 1853, the young Thomas Henry Huxley published a long review of German cell theory in which he roundly criticized the basic tenets of the Schleiden-Schwann model of the cell. Although historians of cytology have dismissed Huxley's criticism as based on an erroneous interpretation of cell physiology, the review is better understood as a contribution to embryology. "The Cell-theory" presents Huxley's "epigenetic" interpretation of histological organization emerging from changes in the protoplasm to replace the "preformationist" cell theory (...)
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  27. Piers J. Hale (2003). Labor and the Human Relationship with Nature: The Naturalization of Politics in the Work of Thomas Henry Huxley, Herbert George Wells, and William Morris. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 36 (2):249 - 284.score: 66.0
    Historically labor has been central to human interactions with the environment, yet environmentalists pay it scant attention. Indeed, they have been critical of those who foreground labor in their politics, socialists in particular. However, environmentalists have found the nineteenth-century socialist William Morris appealing despite the fact that he wrote extensively on labor. This paper considers the place of labor in the relationship between humanity and the natural world in the work of Morris and two of his contemporaries, the eminent scientist (...)
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  28. J. R. Lucas, Wilberforce and Huxley: A Legendary Encounter.score: 54.0
    The legend of the encounter between Wilberforce and Huxley is well established. Almost every scientist knows, and every viewer of the BBC's recent programme on Darwin was shown,* how Samuel Wilberforce, bishop of Oxford, attempted to pour scorn on Darwin's Origin of Species at a meeting of the British Association in Oxford on 30 June 1860, and had the tables turned on him by T. H. Huxley. In this memorable encounter Huxley's simple scientific sincerity humbled the prelatical (...)
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  29. Paul Marshall (2005). Mystical Encounters with the Natural World: Experiences and Explanations. OUP Oxford.score: 54.0
    Some experiences of the natural world bring a sense of unity, knowledge, self-transcendence, eternity, light, and love. This is the first detailed study of these intriguing phenomena. Paul Marshall explores the circumstances, characteristics, and after-effects of this important but relatively neglected type of mystical experience, and critiques explanations that range from the spiritual and metaphysical to the psychoanalytic, contextual, and neuropsychological. The theorists discussed include R. M. Bucke, Edward Carpenter, W. R. Inge, Evelyn Underhill, Rudolf Otto, Sigmund Freud, Aldous (...), R. C. Zaehner, W. T. Stace, Steven Katz, and Robert Forman, as well as contemporary neuroscientists. The book makes a significant contribution to current debates about the nature of mystical experience. (shrink)
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  30. Joel S. Schwartz (1999). Robert Chambers and Thomas Henry Huxley, Science Correspondents: The Popularization and Dissemination of Nineteenth Century Natural Science. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 32 (2):343 - 383.score: 54.0
    Robert Chambers and Thomas Henry Huxley helped popularize science by writing for general interest publications when science was becoming increasingly professionalized. A non-professional, Chambers used his family-owned Chambers' Edinburgh Journal to report on scientific discoveries, giving his audience access to ideas that were only available to scientists who regularly attended professional meetings or read published transactions of such forums. He had no formal training in the sciences and little interest in advancing the professional status of scientists; his course of (...)
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  31. Carl Paul Ellerman (1990). New Notes From Underground. Inquiry 33 (1):3 – 26.score: 54.0
    An American underground man examines arguments to evidence his thesis that Huxley's ?really revolutionary revolution in the souls and flesh of human beings? is being fomented by respected scientific rationalists. Believing that Homo sapiens is an evolutionary error, these benevolent intellectuals wish to alter the human gene pool in order to circumvent genosuicide. Mindful of the veridical knowledge of man issuing from current research in the biological and neurosciences, the underground man contends that these precursors of mankind's second genesis (...)
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  32. Pablo Antillano (2012). La profecía de Huxley y el siglo biotech: La sociedad posthumana nos alcanza. Apuntes Filosóficos 20 (38):105-125.score: 54.0
    Resumen Hace 78 años, en “Un Mundo Feliz”, el escritor Aldous Huxley, en un prodigioso tono satírico, se anticipó con asombrosa precisión a los grandes temas de la agenda científica y política del Siglo XXI: la reproducción controlada, el choque de civilizaciones y la clonación humana, entre otros. Hace unos días, a mediados de mayo de 2010, el J. Craig Venter Institute anunció que había producido la primera célula sin historia genética creada en un laboratorio a partir de un (...)
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  33. C. U. M. Smith (1997). Worlds in Collision: Owen and Huxley on the Brain. Science in Context 10 (2).score: 40.0
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  34. David Knight (2000). Higher Pantheism. Zygon 35 (3):603-612.score: 36.0
    Romantic sensibility and political necessity led Humphry Davy, Britain's most prominent scientist in the first quarter of the nineteenth century, to pantheism: nature worship, involving for him a fervent belief in the immortality of the soul. Rapt with a vision of sublimity, from mountain tops or balloons, men of science in succeeding generations also found in pantheism a reason for their vocation and a way of making sense of their world. It should be seen as an alternative both to active (...)
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  35. Adrian Desmond (2001). Redefining the X Axis: "Professionals," "Amateurs" and the Making of Mid-Victorian Biology: A Progress Report. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 34 (1):3 - 50.score: 36.0
    A summary of revisionist accounts of the contextual meaning of "professional" and "amateur," as applied to the mid-Victorian X Club, is followed by an analysis of the liberal goals and inner tensions of this coalition of gentlemen specialists and government teachers. The changing status of amateurs is appraised, as are the new sites for the emerging laboratory discipline of "biology." Various historiographical strategies for recovering the women's role are considered. The relationship of science journalism to professionalization, and the constructive engagement (...)
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  36. James Strick (1999). Darwinism and the Origin of Life: The Role of H. C. Bastian in the British Spontaneous Generation Debates, 1868-1873. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 32 (1):51 - 92.score: 36.0
    Henry Charlton Bastian's support for spontaneous generation is shown to have developed from his commitment to the new evolutionary science of Darwin, Spencer, Huxley and Tyndall. Tracing Bastian's early career development shows that he was one of the most talented rising young stars among the Darwinians in the 1860s. His argument for a logically necessary link between evolution and spontaneous generation was widely believed among those sympathetic to Darwin's ideas. Spontaneous generation implied materialism to many, however, and it had (...)
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  37. Mary Pickard Winsor (2000). Species, Demes, and the Omega Taxonomy: Gilmour and the Newsystematics. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 15 (3):349-388.score: 36.0
    The word ``deme'' was coined by the botanists J.S.L. Gilmour and J.W.Gregor in 1939, following the pattern of J.S. Huxley's ``cline''. Its purposewas not only to rationalize the plethora of terms describing chromosomaland genetic variation, but also to reduce hostility between traditionaltaxonomists and researchers on evolution, who sometimes scorned eachother's understanding of species. A multi-layered system of compoundterms based on deme was published by Gilmour and J. Heslop-Harrison in1954 but not widely used. Deme was adopted with a modified meaning (...)
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  38. James Elwick (2007). Styles of Reasoning in Early to Mid-Victorian Life Research: Analysis: Synthesis and Palaetiology. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 40 (1):35 - 69.score: 36.0
    To better understand the work of pre-Darwinian British life researchers in their own right, this paper discusses two different styles of reasoning. On the one hand there was analysis:synthesis, where an organism was disintegrated into its constituent parts and then reintegrated into a whole; on the other hand there was palaetiology, the historicist depiction of the progressive specialization of an organism. This paper shows how each style allowed for development, but showed it as moving in opposite directions. In analysis:synthesis, development (...)
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  39. Charles Smith (2007). Deception Meets Enlightenment: From a Viable Theory of Deception to a Quirk About Humanity's Potential. World Futures 63 (1):42 – 54.score: 30.0
    This article seeks to further suggestions made by C. West Churchman (1979) that a full inquiry into human systems requires a viable theory of deception. It argues that such a theory of deception requires an understanding of deception, a recognition of errors in perception, and an ability to see simultaneously from competing points of view. The intent here is to provide some insights that are useful in our understanding of deception, and thereby contributing to a viable theory of deception. Insights (...)
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  40. James Rachels (1990/1991). Created From Animals: The Moral Implications of Darwinism. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    From Bishop Wilberforce in the 1860s to the advocates of "creation science" today, defenders of traditional mores have condemned Darwin's theory of evolution as a threat to society's values. Darwin's defenders, like Stephen Jay Gould, have usually replied that there is no conflict between science and religion--that values and biological facts occupy separate realms. But as James Rachels points out in this thought-provoking study, Darwin himself would disagree with Gould. Darwin, who had once planned on being a clergyman, was convinced (...)
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  41. Massimo Pigliucci & Gerd Muller (eds.) (2010). Evolution – the Extended Synthesis. MIT Press.score: 24.0
    In the six decades since the publication of Julian Huxley's Evolution: The Modern Synthesis, spectacular empirical advances in the biological sciences have been accompanied by equally significant developments within the core theoretical framework of the discipline. As a result, evolutionary theory today includes concepts and even entire new fields that were not part of the foundational structure of the Modern Synthesis. In this volume, sixteen leading evolutionary biologists and philosophers of science survey the conceptual changes that have emerged since (...)
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  42. Mary Pickard Winsor (1995). The English Debate on Taxonomy and Phylogeny, 1937-1940. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 17 (2):227 - 252.score: 24.0
    Between 1937 and 1940 the Taxonomic Principles Committee of the newly-founded Association for the Study of Systematics in Relation to General Biology (later the Systematics Association) attempted to define the relationship between evolution and taxonomy. The people who took part in the discussion were W.T. Calman, C.R.P. Diver, J.S.L. Gilmour, J.S. Huxley, W.D. Lang, J.R. Norman, R. Melville, O.W. Richards, M.A. Smith, T.A. Sprague, H. Hamshaw Thomas, W.B. Turrill, B.P. Uvarov, A.F. Watkins, E.I. White, and A.J. Wilmott. Most of (...)
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  43. Ernst Mayr, The Unofficial Stephen Jay Gould Archive.score: 24.0
    Theories postulating saltational evolution are a necessary consequence of essentialism. If one believes in constant types, only the sudden production of a new type can lead to evolutionary change. That such saltations can occur and indeed that their occurrence is a necessity is an old belief. Almost all of the theories of evolution described by H. F. Osborn (1894) in his From the Greek s to Darwin were saltational theories, that is, theories of the sudden origin of new kinds. The (...)
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  44. Voltairine de Cleyre, They Who Marry Do Ill (1908).score: 24.0
    MDI.4 So much as I have been able to put together the pieces of the universe in my small head, there is no absolute right or wrong; there is only a relativity, depending on the consciously though very slowly altering condition of a social race in respect to the rest of the world. Right and wrong are social conceptions: mind, I do not say human conceptions. The names “right” and “wrong,” truly, are of human invention only; but the conception “right” (...)
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  45. Rhodri Hayward (2012). The Invention of the Psychosocial: An Introduction. History of the Human Sciences 25 (5):3-12.score: 24.0
    Although the compound adjective ‘psychosocial’ was first used by academic psychologists in the 1890s, it was only in the interwar period that psychiatrists, psychologists and social workers began to develop detailed models of the psychosocial domain. These models marked a significant departure from earlier ideas of the relationship between society and human nature. Whereas Freudians and Darwinians had described an antagonistic relationship between biological instincts and social forces, interwar authors insisted that individual personality was made possible through collective organization. This (...)
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  46. Bernard Lightman (2011). Periodicals and Controversy. Spontaneous Generations 5 (1):5-11.score: 24.0
    In 1854 the biologist Thomas Henry Huxley pointed to a significant change in the way that reviewers were treating books that endorsed deeply flawed scientific theories. In the past, “when a book had been shown to be a mass of pretentious nonsense,” it “quietly sunk into its proper limbo. But these days appear, unhappily, to have gone by.” Due to the “utter ignorance of the public mind as to the methods of science and the criterion of truth,” scientists were (...)
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  47. Evelleen Richards (1989). The "Moral Anatomy" of Robert Knox: The Interplay Between Biological and Social Thought in Victorian Scientific Naturalism. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 22 (3):373 - 436.score: 24.0
    Historians are now generally agreed that the Darwinian recognition and institutionalization of the polygenist position was more than merely nominal.194 Wallace, Vogt, and Huxley had led the way, and we may add Galton (1869) to the list of those leading Darwinians who incorporated a good deal of polygenist thinking into their interpretions of human history and racial differences.195 Eventually “Mr. Darwin himself,” as Hunt had suggested he might, consolidated the Darwinian endorsement of many features of polygenism. Darwin's Descent of (...)
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  48. Ronald K. Mitchell (2004). Evolutionary Biology Research, Entrepreneurship, and the Morality of Security-Seeking Behavior in an Imperfect Economy. The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics 2004:263-287.score: 24.0
    This article investigates whether there is an underlying morality in the ways that human beings seek to obtain economic security within our imperfect economy, which can be illuminated through evolutionary biology research. Two research questions are the focus of the analysis: (1) What is the transaction cognitive machinery that is specialized for the entrepreneurial task of exchange-based security-seeking? and, (2) What are the moral implications of the acquisition and use of such transaction cognitions?Evolutionary biology research suggests within concepts that are (...)
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  49. Janet L. Travis (1971). A Criticism of the Use of the Concept of "Dominant Group" in Arguments for Evolutionary Progressivism. Philosophy of Science 38 (3):369-375.score: 24.0
    I criticize the particular argument for evolutionary progressivism which is based on the concept of a series of "dominant life forms." My procedure is to show that there is no rigorous definition for the concept of "dominant life form." I examine several attempts to define this concept by Julian Huxley and a new formulation of the concept by G. G. Simpson and show that none of the criteria either of these men develop for determining which groups of organisms can (...)
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  50. Ruth Barton (1998). Just Before Nature: The Purposes of Science and the Purposes of Popularization in Some English Popular Science Journals of the 1860s. Annals of Science 55 (1):1-33.score: 24.0
    Summary Popular science journalism flourished in the 1860s in England, with many new journals being projected. The time was ripe, Victorian men of science believed, for an ?organ of science? to provide a means of communication between specialties, and between men of science and the public. New formats were tried as new purposes emerged. Popular science journalism became less recreational and educational. Editorial commentary and reviewing the progress of science became more important. The analysis here emphasizes those aspects of popular (...)
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