Search results for 'Brian Armstrong' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. S. Armstrong (2007). Brian G. Henning: Beauty, Morality, and a Processive Cosmos. Environmental Ethics 29 (2):209.
     
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  2.  23
    R. F. Atkinson, Brian Medlin, T. A. Goudge, Hidé Ishiguro, Gillian Romney, J. H. S. Armstrong, Peter Winch, R. S. Downie & Vincent Turner (1964). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 73 (292):595-616.
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  3.  8
    Brian Armstrong & Edgar Morscher (2007). World and Life as One: Ethics and Ontology in Wittgenstein's Early Thought, by Martin Stokhof. European Journal of Philosophy 15 (2):297–301.
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  4. Brian Armstrong (1975). Review. [REVIEW] Bibliothèque d'Humanisme Et Renaissance 37 (1):146-147.
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  5. D. M. Armstrong, John Bacon, Keith Campbell & Lloyd Reinhardt (eds.) (1993). Ontology, Causality, and Mind: Essays in Honor of D.M. Armstrong. Cambridge University Press.
  6.  5
    D. M. Armstrong (1975). Towards a Theory of Properties: Work in Progress on the Problem of Universals: D. M. Armstrong. Philosophy 50 (192):145-155.
    Many philosophers have declared that everything which exists is a particular. There is a weak interpretation of this doctrine which I believe to be a true proposition, and a strong one which I believe to be false.
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  7.  1
    A. H. Armstrong (1979). The Dimensions of the Self: Buddhi in the Bhagavad-G¯Tā and Psyché in Plotinus: A. H. Armstrong and R. Ravindra. Religious Studies 15 (3):327-342.
    The Bhagavad-Gītā is the most important text in the smrti literature of India, as distinct from the śruti literature which is traditionally regarded as ultimately authoritative. The Bhagavad-Gītā has been assigned a date ranging from the fifth century B.C. to the second century B.C. The Indian religious tradition places the Gītā at the end of the third age of the present cycle of the universe and the beginning of the fourth, namely the Kali Yuga to which we belong.
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  8. A. H. Armstrong & R. A. Markus (1960). Christian Faith and Greek Philosophy [by] A.H. Armstrong and R.A. Markus. Darton, Longman & Todd.
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  9. A. H. Armstrong, H. J. Blumenthal & R. A. Markus (eds.) (1981). Neoplatonism and Early Christian Thought: Essays in Honour of A.H. Armstrong. Variorum Publications.
     
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  10. D. M. Armstrong (1996). Place and Armstrong's Views Compared. In Tim Crane (ed.), Dispositions: A Debate. New York: Routledge 33--48.
     
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  11. Richard Falckenberg & Andrew Campbell Armstrong (1895). History of Modern Philosophy From Nicolas of Cusa to the Present Time, Tr. By A.C. Armstrong. 1st Amer. Ed.
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  12.  2
    Catherine Z. Elgin (1991). Review: D. M. Armstrong, A Combinatorial Theory of Possibility; Brian Skyrms, Tractarian Nominalism. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 56 (1):352-355.
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  13. Catherine Z. Elgin (1991). Armstrong DM. A Combinatorial Theory of Possibility. Cambridge Studies in Philosophy. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge Etc. 1989, Xiii+ 156 Pp. Skyrms Brian. Tractarian Nominalism. Therein, Pp. 145–152.(Reprinted From Philosophical Studies, Vol. 40 (1981), Pp. 199–206.). [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 56 (1):352-355.
  14.  23
    David M. Armstrong (1968). The Nature of Mind and Other Essays. Humanities Press.
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  15.  64
    David M. Armstrong (1959). Mr Arthadeva and Naive Realism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 37 (May):67-70.
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  16.  61
    David M. Armstrong (1963). Max Deutscher and Perception. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 41 (August):246-249.
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  17.  45
    David M. Armstrong (1964). Vesey on Bodily Sensations. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 42 (August):247-248.
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  18.  28
    David M. Armstrong (1963). Vesey on Sensations of Heat. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 41 (December):359-362.
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  19.  85
    Brian Ellis (1999). Response to David Armstrong. In Howard Sankey (ed.), Causation and Laws of Nature. Kluwer 39--43.
  20. Brian Ellis (1990). Armstrong, D. M.: "Universals: An Opinionated Introduction". [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 68:462.
     
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  21.  68
    Benjamin Libet, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Lynn Nadel (eds.) (2010). Conscious Will and Responsibility: A Tribute to Benjamin Libet. Oxford University Press.
    Benjamin Libet, Do we have free will? -- Adina L. Roskies, Why Libet's studies don't pose a threat to free will? -- Alfred r. mele, libet on free will : readiness potentials, decisions, and awareness? -- Susan Pockett and Suzanne Purdy, Are voluntary movements initiated preconsciously? : the relationships between readiness potentials, urges, and decisions? -- William P. Banks and Eve A. Isham, Do we really know what we are doing? : implications of reported time of decision for theories of (...)
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  22.  5
    Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (ed.) (2007). Moral Psychology: The Cognitive Science of Morality: Intuition and Diversity. A Bradford Book.
    For much of the twentieth century, philosophy and science went their separate ways. In moral philosophy, fear of the so-called naturalistic fallacy kept moral philosophers from incorporating developments in biology and psychology. Since the 1990s, however, many philosophers have drawn on recent advances in cognitive psychology, brain science, and evolutionary psychology to inform their work. This collaborative trend is especially strong in moral philosophy, and these three volumes bring together some of the most innovative work by both (...)
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  23. Tuomas E. Tahko (2016). Armstrong on Truthmaking and Realism. In Francesco F. Calemi (ed.), Metaphysics and Scientific Realism: Essays in Honour of David Malet Armstrong. De Gruyter 207-218.
    The title of this paper reflects the fact truthmaking is quite frequently considered to be expressive of realism. What this means, exactly, will become clearer in the course of our discussion, but since we are interested in Armstrong’s work on truthmaking in particular, it is natural to start from a brief discussion of how truthmaking and realism appear to be associated in his work. In this paper, special attention is given to the supposed link between truthmaking and realism, but (...)
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  24. Edgar Morscher Brian Armstrong (2007). World and Life as One: Ethics and Ontology in Wittgenstein's Early Thought, by Martin Stokhof. European Journal of Philosophy 15 (2):297-301.
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  25. Philip Goff (2011). A Posteriori Physicalists Get Our Phenomenal Concepts Wrong. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 89 (2):191 - 209.
    Dualists say plausible things about our mental concepts: there is a way of thinking of pain, in terms of how it feels, which is independent of causal role. Physicalists make attractive ontological claims: the world is wholly physical. The attraction of a posteriori physicalism is that it has seemed to do both: to agree with the dualist about our mental concepts, whilst retaining a physicalist ontology. In this paper I argue that, in fact, a posteriori physicalism departs from the dualist's (...)
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  26. Alexander Bird (2005). The Ultimate Argument Against Armstrong's Contingent Necessitation View of Laws. Analysis 65 (286):147-55.
    I show that Armstrong’s view of laws as second-order contingent relations of ‘necessitation’ among categorical properties faces a dilemma. The necessitation relation confers a relation of extensional inclusion (‘constant conjunction’) on its relata. It does so either necessarily or contingently. If necessarily, it is not a categorical relation (in the relevant sense). If contingently, then an explanation is required of how it confers extensional inclusion. That explanation will need to appeal to a third-order relation between necessitation and extensional inclusion. (...)
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  27. Mark Colyvan (1998). Can the Eleatic Principle Be Justified? Canadian Journal of Philosophy 28 (3):313 - 335.
    The Eleatic Principle or causal criterion is a causal test that entities must pass in order to gain admission to some philosophers’ ontology.1 This principle justifies belief in only those entities to which causal power can be attributed, that is, to those entities which can bring about changes in the world. The idea of such a test is rather important in modern ontology, since it is neither without intuitive appeal nor without influential supporters. Its supporters have included David Armstrong (...)
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  28. Jonathan Smith (2010). On Sinnott-Armstrong's Case Against Moral Intuitionism. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (1):75 - 88.
    Walter Sinnott-Armstrong has argued against moral intuitionism, according to which some of our moral beliefs are justified without needing to be inferred from any other beliefs. He claims that any prima facie justification some non-inferred moral beliefs might have enjoyed is removed because many of our moral beliefs are formed in circumstances where either (1) we are partial, (2) others disagree with us and there is no reason to prefer our moral judgement to theirs, (3) we are emotional in (...)
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  29. Markus Schrenk (2005). The Bookkeeper and the Lumberjack. Metaphysical Vs. Nomological Necessity. In G. Abel (ed.), Kreativität. XX. Deutscher Kongress für Philosophie. Sektionsbeiträge Band 1. Universitätsverlag der Technischen Universität
    The striking difference between the orthodox nomological necessitation view of laws and the claims made recently by Scientific Essentialism is that on the latter interpretation laws are metaphysically necessary while they are contingent on the basis of the former. This shift is usually perceived as an upgrading: essentialism makes the laws as robust as possible. The aim of my paper—in which I contrast Brian Ellis’s Scientific Essentialism and David Armstrong’s theory of nomological necessity—is threefold. (1) I first underline (...)
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  30.  68
    Javier Kalhat (2008). A Critique of Armstrong's Truthmaking Account of Possibility. Acta Analytica 23 (2):161-176.
    In this paper I argue against Armstrong’s recent truthmaking account of possibility. I show that the truthmaking account presupposes modality in a number of different ways, and consequently that it is incapable of underwriting a genuine reduction of modality. I also argue that Armstrong’s account faces serious difficulties irrespective of the question of reduction; in particular, I argue that his Entailment and Possibility Principles are both false.
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  31. Daniel C. Dennett, Review of Nagel, Other Minds. [REVIEW]
    The institution of book reviews, flawed though it may be, still performs a crucial service of resource enhancement for a discipline, funneling informed attention to at least some of the best among a superfluity of publications. During the last quarter century, Thomas Nagel's book reviews and critical essays have played a major role, shaping opinion, and thereby shaping the field. Now he has gathered his favorites in a collection, ten in philosophy of mind, and a dozen in ethics and political (...)
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  32.  45
    Ghislain Guigon (2011). Armstrong, David M. Les Universaux. Une introduction partisane, trad. de l'anglais par Stéphane Dunand, Bruno Langlet et Jean-Maurice Monnoyer, Paris, Les éditions d'Ithaque, coll. « Science et Métaphysique », 2010, 208 p. [REVIEW] Philosophiques 38 (1):331-336.
    This is a review (in French) of the French translation and edition of D.M. Armstrong's Universals: An Opiniated Introduction.
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  33.  5
    Timothy Pawl (2016). Brian Hebblethwaite's Arguments Against Multiple Incarnations. Religious Studies 52 (1):117-130.
    In this article I present two arguments from Brian Hebblethwaite for the conclusion that multiple incarnations are impossible, as well as the analyses of those arguments provided by three other thinkers: Oliver Crisp, Peter Kevern, and Robin Le Poidevin. I argue that both of Hebblethwaite's arguments are unsound.
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  34.  35
    Daniel von Wachter (2004). The Ontological Turn Misunderstood: How to Misunderstand David Armstrong’s Theory of Possibility. Metaphysica 5 (2):105-114.
    This article argues that there is a great divide between semantics and metaphysics. Much of what is called metaphysics today is still stuck in the linguistic turn. This is illustrated by showing how Fraser MacBride misunderstands David Armstrong's theory of modality.
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  35.  29
    Mark T. Nelson (2003). Sinnott–Armstrong's Moral Scepticism. Ratio 16 (1):63–82.
    Walter Sinnott-Armstrong's recent defense of moral skepticism raises the debate to a new level, but I argue that it is unsatisfactory because of problems with its assumption of global skepticism, with its use of the Skeptical Hypothesis Argument, and with its use of the idea of contrast classes and the correlative distinction between "everyday" justification and "philosophical" justification. I draw on Chisholm's treatment of the Problem of the Criterion to show that my claim that I know that, e.g., baby-torture (...)
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  36. Sharon R. Ford (2010). What Fundamental Properties Suffice to Account for the Manifest World? Powerful Structure. Dissertation, University of Queensland
    This Thesis engages with contemporary philosophical controversies about the nature of dispositional properties or powers and the relationship they have to their non-dispositional counterparts. The focus concerns fundamentality. In particular, I seek to answer the question, ‘What fundamental properties suffice to account for the manifest world?’ The answer I defend is that fundamental categorical properties need not be invoked in order to derive a viable explanation for the manifest world. My stance is a field-theoretic view which describes the world as (...)
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  37.  2
    Joachim Schulte & Göran Sundholm (eds.) (1992). Criss-Crossing a Philosophical Landscape: Essays on Wittgensteinian Themes. Dedicated to Brian Mcguinness. Rodopi.
    Essays on Wittgensteinian Themes Dedicated to Brian McGuinness Joachim Schulte, Göran Sundholm. PREFACE For thirty-five years the international community of philosophers have known Brian McGuinness as a major authority on the ...
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  38. Thomas Nagel (1970). Armstrong on the Mind. Philosophical Review 79 (July):394-403.
  39.  49
    Fraser MacBride (1999). Could Armstrong Have Been a Universal? Mind 108 (431):471-501.
    There cannot be a reductive theory of modality constructed from the concepts of sparse particular and sparse universal. These concepts are suffused with modal notions. I seek to establish this conclusion by tracing out the pattern of modal entanglements in which these concepts are involved. In order to appreciate the structure of these entanglements a distinction must be drawn between the lower-order necessary connections in which particulars and universals apparently figure, and higher-order necesary connections. The former type of connection relates (...)
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  40. Markku Keinänen (2008). Armstrong's Conception of Supervenience. In Tim de Mey & Markku Keinänen (eds.), Problems From Armstrong. Acta Philosophica Fennica 84 51.
    In this article, I will focus on the notion of supervenience introduced and deployed by Armstrong. The aim is to settle the issue of whether it has any fruitful applications. My conclusions are negative. Armstrong gives to his notion of supervenience a major explanatory role of telling why one need not consider certain beings as a genuine ontic expansion, if one already assumes a certain meagre set of more basic entities. On closer inspection, however, Armstrong’s notion does (...)
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  41.  59
    Max Deutscher (1963). David Armstrong and Perception. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 41 (May):80-88.
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  42.  29
    John A. Foster (2004). Reply to Armstrong. Harvard Review of Philosophy 12 (1):27-28.
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  43.  54
    K. Campbell (1993). David Armstrong and Realism About Colour. In John Bacon, K. Campbell & Lloyd Reinhardt (eds.), Ontology, Causality, and Mind. Cambridge University Press
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  44.  30
    Max O. Hocutt (1974). Armstrong and Strawson on 'Disembodied Existence'. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 35 (September):46-59.
  45.  25
    David R. Hiley (1973). Armstrong's Concept of a Mental State. Southern Journal of Philosophy 11 (1-2):113-118.
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  46.  21
    Godfrey N. A. Vesey (1963). Armstrong on Sensations of Heat. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 41 (August):250-254.
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  47.  22
    George F. Englebretsen (1972). Armstrong on Disembodied Minds. Dialogue 11 (December):576-579.
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  48.  27
    Ingvar Johansson (2002). Critical Notice of Armstrong's and Lewis' Concepts of Supervenience. SATS: Northern European Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):118-122.
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  49.  28
    Howard M. Robinson (1972). Professor Armstrong on 'Non-Physical Sensory Items'. Mind 81 (January):84-86.
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  50.  18
    Michael P. Hodges (1979). Armstrong's Causal Analysis and Direct Knowledge. Southern Journal of Philosophy 17 (3):335-343.
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