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Brian Ellis [89]Brian D. Ellis [1]
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Profile: Brian Ellis (University of Nebraska, Lincoln)
  1.  53
    Brian Ellis (2014). The Metaphysics of Scientific Realism. Routledge.
    This book presents a major statement on the dominant philosophy of science by one of the world's leading metaphysicians. Brian Ellis's new book develops the metaphysics of scientific realism to the point where it begins to take on the characteristics of a first philosophy. As most people understand it, scientific realism is not yet such a theory. It is not sufficiently general, and has no plausible applications in fields other than the well-established sciences. Nevertheless, Ellis demonstrates that the original arguments (...)
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  2. Brian Ellis & Caroline Lierse (1994). Dispositional Essentialism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 72 (1):27 – 45.
  3. John Bigelow, Brian Ellis & Caroline Lierse (1992). The World as One of a Kind: Natural Necessity and Laws of Nature. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 43 (3):371-388.
  4. Brian Ellis (2002). The Philosophy of Nature: A Guide to the New Essentialism. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    For many years essentialism was considered beyond the pale in philosophy, a relic of discredited Aristotelianism. This is no longer so. Kripke and Putnam have made belief in essential natures respectable once more. Harré and Madden have argued against Hume's theory of causation and developed an alternative theory based on the assumption that there are genuine causal powers in nature. Dretske, Tooley, Armstrong, Swoyer, and Carroll have all developed strong alternatives to Hume's theory of the laws of nature. And Shoemaker (...)
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  5.  11
    Brian Ellis (1969). Basic Concepts of Measurement. Journal of Symbolic Logic 34 (2):310-311.
    The nature of measurement is a topic of central concern in the philosophy of science and, indeed, measurement is the essential link between science and mathematics. Professor Ellis's book, originally published in 1966, is the first general exposition of the philosophical and logical principles involved in measurement since N. R. Campbell's Principles of Measurement and Calculation , and P. W. Bridgman's Dimensional Analysis . Professor Ellis writes from an empiricist standpoint. His object is to distinguish and define the basic concepts (...)
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  6. Brian Ellis (1999). Causal Powers and Laws of Nature. In Howard Sankey (ed.), Causation and Laws of Nature. Kluwer 19--34.
  7.  92
    Brian Ellis (2005). Universals, the Essential Problem and Categorical Properties. Ratio 18 (4):462–472.
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  8. Brian Ellis (2010). Causal Powers and Categorical Properties. In Anna Marmodoro (ed.), The Metaphysics of Powers: Their Grounding and Their Manifestations. Routledge
    The aim of this paper is to argue that there are categorical properties as well as causal powers, and that the world would not exist as we know it without them. For categorical properties are needed to define the powers—to locate them, and to specify their laws of action. These categorical properties, I shall argue, are not dispositional. For their identities do not depend on what they dispose their bearers to do. They are, as Alexander Bird would say, ’quiddities’. But (...)
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  9. John Bigelow, Brian Ellis & Robert Pargetter (1988). Forces. Philosophy of Science 55 (4):614-630.
    Traditionally, forces are causes of a special sort. Forces have been conceived to be the direct or immediate causes of things. Other sorts of causes act indirectly by producing forces which are transmitted in various ways to produce various effects. However, forces are supposed to act directly without the mediation of anything else. But forces, so conceived, appear to be occult. They are mysterious, because we have no clear conception of what they are, as opposed to what they are postulated (...)
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  10. Brian Ellis (2000). Causal Laws and Singular Causation. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 61 (2):329-351.
    In this paper it will be argued that causal laws describe the actions of causal powers. The process which results from such an action is one which belongs to a natural kind, the essence of which is that it is a display of this causal power. Therefore, if anything has a given causal power necessarily, it must be naturally disposed to act in the manner prescribed by the causal law describing the action of this causal power. In the formal expressions (...)
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  11. Brian Ellis (2007). Scientific Essentialism. Cambridge University Press.
    Scientific Essentialism defends the view that the fundamental laws of nature depend on the essential properties of the things on which they are said to operate, and are therefore not independent of them. These laws are not imposed upon the world by God, the forces of nature or anything else, but rather are immanent in the world. Ellis argues that ours is a dynamic world consisting of more or less transient objects which are constantly interacting with each other, and whose (...)
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  12.  78
    Brian Ellis (2005). Physical Realism. Ratio 18 (4):371–384.
    Physical realism is the thesis that the world is more or less as present‐day physical theory says it is, i.e. a mind‐independent reality, that consists fundamentally of physical objects that have causal powers, are located in space and time, belong to natural kinds, and interact causally with each other in various natural kinds of ways. It is thus a modern form of physicalism that takes due account of the natural kinds structure of the world. It is a thesis that many (...)
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  13.  87
    Brian Ellis (1999). Response to David Armstrong. In Howard Sankey (ed.), Causation and Laws of Nature. Kluwer 39--43.
  14. Brian Ellis (2009). The Metaphysics of Scientific Realism. Routledge.
    This book presents a major statement on the dominant philosophy of science by one of the world's leading metaphysicians. Brian Ellis's new book develops the metaphysics of scientific realism to the point where it begins to take on the characteristics of a first philosophy. As most people understand it, scientific realism is not yet such a theory. It is not sufficiently general, and has no plausible applications in fields other than the well-established sciences. Nevertheless, Ellis demonstrates that the original arguments (...)
     
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  15. Brian Ellis (1973). The Logic of Subjective Probability. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 24 (2):125-152.
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  16.  90
    Brian Ellis (2005). Marc Lange on Essentialism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 83 (1):75 – 79.
    For scientific essentialists, the only logical possibilities of existence are the real (or metaphysical) ones, and such possibilities, they say, are relative to worlds. They are not a priori, and they cannot just be invented. Rather, they are discoverable only by the a posteriori methods of science. There are, however, many philosophers who think that real possibilities are knowable a priori, or that they can just be invented. Marc Lange [Lange 2004] thinks that they can be invented, and tries to (...)
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  17.  26
    Brian Ellis (1985). 3 What Science Aims to Do. In P. M. Churchland & C. A. Hooker (eds.), Images of Science: Essays on Realism and Empiricism. University of Chicago Press 48.
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  18. Brian Ellis (2004). Scientific Realism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 68 (2):495-497.
  19. Edoardo Zamuner & Brian Ellis (forthcoming). “Review of Machery’s ‘Doing Without Concepts’”. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics.
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  20. Brian Ellis (2005). Katzav on the Limitations of Dispositionalism. Analysis 65 (285):90–92.
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  21.  71
    Brian Ellis, Frank Jackson & Robert Pargetter (1977). An Objection to Possible-World Semantics for Counterfactual Logics. Journal of Philosophical Logic 6 (1):355 - 357.
  22.  12
    Brian Ellis (2008). Natural Kinds. In Martin Curd & Stathis Psillos (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Science. Routledge 139.
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  23. Brian Ellis (1988). Solving the Problem of Induction Using a Values-Based Epistemology. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 39 (2):141-160.
  24.  28
    Brian Ellis (1978). A Unified Theory of Conditionals. Journal of Philosophical Logic 7 (1):107 - 124.
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  25.  61
    Brian Ellis (1963). Universal and Differential Forces. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 14 (55):177-194.
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  26.  89
    Brian Ellis (1988). Internal Realism. Synthese 76 (3):409 - 434.
    I argue in this paper that anyone who accepts the ontology of scientific realism can only accept a pragmatic theory of truth, i.e., a theory on which truth is what it is epistemically right to believe. But the combination of realism with such a theory of truth is a form of internal realism; therefore, a scientific realist should be an internal realist. The strategy of the paper is to argue that there is no adequate semantic or correspondence theory of truth (...)
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  27.  14
    Brian Ellis (2006). Constructing an Ontology. In Paolo Valore (ed.), Topics on General and Formal Ontology. Polimetrica International Scientific Publisher 15-26.
    Empirical, logical, historical and mathematical inquiries may be able to tell us what it is ultimately right for us to believe in these various fields, and, in this pragmatic sense, they may be able to tell us what is true. But such inquiries cannot tell us what must exist in reality for them to be true, since they cannot tell us what their truthmakers are. To do this, we have to step back from the particular disciplines of science, mathematics, history, (...)
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  28.  42
    Brian Ellis (1984). Two Theories of Indicative Conditionals. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 62 (1):50 – 66.
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  29.  33
    Brian Ellis (1976). Avowals Are More Corrigible Than You Think. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 55 (August):201-5.
  30.  33
    Brian Ellis (2010). An Essentialist Perspective on the Problem of Induction. Principia 2 (1):103-124.
    If one believes, as Hume did, that all events are loose and separate, then the problem of induction is probably insoluble. Anything could happen. But if one thinks, as scientific essentialists do, that the laws of nature are immanent in the world, and depend on the essential natures of things, then there are strong constraints on what could possibly happen. Given these constraints, the problem of induction may be soluble. For these constraints greatly strengthen the case for conceptual and theoretical (...)
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  31.  70
    Brian Ellis (1967). Physical Monism. Synthese 17 (June):141-161.
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  32.  11
    Brian Ellis (1976). The Existence of Forces. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 7 (2):171-185.
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  33.  26
    Brian Ellis & Peter Bowman (1967). Conventionality in Distant Simulataneity. Philosophy of Science 34 (2):116-136.
    In his original paper of 1905, "On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies", Einstein described a procedure for synchronizing distant clocks at rest in any inertial system K. Clocks thus synchronized may be said to be in standard signal synchrony in K. It has often been claimed that there are no logical or physical reasons for preferring standard signal synchronizations to any of a range of possible non-standard ones. In this paper, the range of consistent non-standard signal synchronizations, first for any (...)
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  34.  17
    Brian Ellis, Essentialism and Natural Kinds.
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  35.  25
    Brian Ellis (1960). Some Fundamental Problems of Direct Measurement. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 38 (1):37 – 47.
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  36.  29
    Brian Ellis (1992). Scientific Platonism. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 23 (4):665-679.
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  37.  45
    Brian Ellis (2011). Humanism and Morality. Sophia 50 (1):135-139.
    A theory of morality acceptable to humanists must be one that can be accepted independently of religion. In this paper, I argue that while there is such a theory, it is a non-standard one, and its acceptance would have some far-reaching consequences. As one might expect, the theory is similar to others in various ways. But it is not the same as any of them. Indeed, it is a radically new theory. Like Hume’s ethics, it is founded on our natural (...)
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  38.  47
    Brian Ellis (1957). A Comparison of Process and Non-Process Theories in the Physical Sciences. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 8 (29):45-56.
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  39.  1
    Lenny Clapp & Brian Ellis (2002). Scientific Essentialism. Philosophical Review 111 (4):589.
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  40. Brian Ellis (2008). Powers and Dispositions. In Ruth Groff (ed.), Revitalizing Causality: Realism About Causality in Philosophy and Social Science. Routledge
     
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  41. Brian Ellis (2000). The New Essentialism and the Scientific Image of Man-Kind. Epistemologia 23 (2):189-210.
     
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  42. Brian Ellis (1987). The Ontology of Scientific Realism. In J. J. C. Smart, Philip Pettit, Richard Sylvan & Jean Norman (eds.), Metaphysics and Morality: Essays in Honour of J.J.C. Smart. B. Blackwell
     
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  43.  12
    Brian Ellis (1992). Truth and the End of Inquiry. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 22 (3):381-392.
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  44.  33
    Brian Ellis (1999). A Review Essay on God, Chance & Necessity. Sophia 38 (1):89-98.
  45.  11
    Brian Ellis, God, Chance and Necessity.
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  46.  19
    Brian Ellis (2011). Doing Without Concepts. Review of Metaphysics 64 (3):644-645.
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  47.  23
    J. L. Mackie & Brian Ellis (1955). Has the Universe a Beginning in Time? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 33 (2):118 – 124.
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  48.  9
    Brian Ellis (1978). Is Signal Synchrony Independent of Transport Synchrony? Philosophy of Science 45 (2):309-311.
  49.  14
    Brian Ellis (2012). The Ideals of Social Humanism. The Australian Humanist 108 (108):7.
    Ellis, Brian Humanists have an unconditional concern for the wellbeing and dignity of humankind. They are fundamentally concerned with increasing the overall quality of people's lives, regardless of their behaviour, and to treat people with respect. They seek to do so by promoting the development of people's natural talents and inculcating attitudes of mutual respect and tolerance. Their central idea is that every person should be treated with equal concern for their good.
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  50. Brian Ellis (2013). Humanism and Society. The Australian Humanist 110 (110):3.
    Ellis, Brian Humanism has a lot to offer the world. It is not just an individual moral philosophy, although it includes such a philosophy. Nor is it just a political program, although it implies one. The theory of social humanism, which was developed in a book I published last year, is both a moral and a political philosophy. It is socially democratic, and morally and politically humanistic.
     
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