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Search results for 'Brian H. Tsou' (try it on Scholar)

  1. Vincent A. Billock & Brian H. Tsou (2004). Color, Qualia, and Psychophysical Constraints on Equivalence of Color Experience. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):164-165.score: 870.0
    It has been suggested that difficult-to-quantify differences in visual processing may prevent researchers from equating the color experience of different observers. However, spectral locations of unique hues are remarkably invariant with respect to everything other than gross differences in preretinal and photoreceptor absorptions. This suggests a stereotyping of neural color processing and leads us to posit that minor differences in observer neurophysiology may be irrelevant to color experience.
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  2. Jonathan Y. Tsou (2006). Review of Paolo Parrini, Wesley C. Salmon, & Merrilee H. Salmon (Eds.), Logical Empiricism: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives. [REVIEW] Dialogue 45 (4):808-810.score: 240.0
  3. C. -S. Lin, K. -I. Tsou, S. -L. Cho, M. -S. Hsieh, H. -C. Wu & C. -H. Lin (2012). Is Medical Students' Moral Orientation Changeable After Preclinical Medical Education? Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (3):168-173.score: 240.0
    Purpose Moral orientation can affect ethical decision-making. Very few studies have focused on whether medical education can change the moral orientation of the students. The purpose of the present study was to document the types of moral orientation exhibited by medical students, and to study if their moral orientation was changed after preclinical education. Methods From 2007 to 2009, the Mojac scale was used to measure the moral orientation of Taiwan medical students. The students included 271 first-year and 109 third-year (...)
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