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Profile: Brian Harding (Texas Woman's University)
  1.  5
    Brian Harding (2015). Ontology After Ontotheology: Plurality, Event and Contingency in Contemporary Philosophy. By Gert‐Jan van der Heiden. Pp. Ix, 340, Pittsburg, Duquesne University Press, 2014, $30.00. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 56 (6):1085-1086.
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  2.  17
    Brian Harding (2006). Epistemology and Eudaimonism in Augustine's Contra Academicos. Augustinian Studies 37 (2):247-271.
    The paper has two main parts. First, I introduce the eudaimonistic setting of the epistemological discussions in book one and – very briefly – and make a few points about book two. Second, in an analysis of book three, I show how Augustine relieves a tension which was present between the conclusions of books one and two and how the relief of that tension culminates in a critique of the skeptic’s eudaimonistic claims more so than their epistemological ones.
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  3.  40
    Brian Harding (2005). Epoché, the Transcendental Ego, and Intersubjectivity in Husserl's Phenomenology. Journal of Philosophical Research 30:141-156.
    This essay is concerned with defending Husserl against the criticism that he is insuffi ciently attentive to intersubjectivity. It has two moments; the fi rst articulates what I take to be a general version of the critique and then turns to a discussion of a version derived from Wittgenstein’s private language argument and the ensuing debate regarding this critique between Suzanne Cunningham and Peter Hutcheson. This discussion concludes by noting a general agreement betweenthe two participants that Husserl’s ego is not (...)
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  4.  14
    Brian Harding (2003). Skepticism, Illumination and Christianity In Augustine's Contra Academicos. Augustinian Studies 34 (2):197-212.
    This is my first published paper, written over a decade ago. I can't remember exactly what I argued in it, but I can assure you that the follow up paper "Epistemology and Eudaimonism in Augustine's Contra Academicos" is better.
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  5. Brian Harding (2009). Machiavelli’s Politics and Critical Theory of Technology. Argumentos de Razón Técnica: Revista Española de Ciencia, Tecnología y Sociedad, y Filosofía de la Tecnología 12:37-58.
    This paper attempts to forge a dialogue between Machiavelli and Andrew Feenburg's Critical Theory of Technology. It makes some interesting points along the way, but I've re-thought a lot of what I say in here, and am not sure if I would still endorse it all.
     
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  6.  17
    Brian Harding (2013). Saturating the Phenomenon: Marion and Buber. Sophia 52 (2):295-313.
    This paper argues that Martin Buber's account of theI-Thou relationship is necessary and sufficient for a saturated phenomenon. The paper is split into three sections, plus this introduction. The first section begins by describing Marion’s account of the varying degrees of phenomenality. It argues that the givenness of phenomena alone does not account for these varying degrees and that while Marion sometimes admits this, he is vague about what does account for it. The second section of the paper argues that (...)
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  7.  24
    Brian Harding (2012). Auto-Affectivity and Michel Henry's Material Phenomenology. Philosophical Forum 43 (1):91-100.
    This paper provides an introduction and overview of Michel Henry's work, with particular emphasis on his understanding of auto-affectivity. It concludes by pointing to some objections or questions sympathetic phenomenologists may have for his work.
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  8.  5
    Brian Harding (2014). Object Oriented Ontology and José Ortega y Gasset’s Anti-Idealist Interpretation of Phenomenology. Southwest Philosophy Review 30 (1):169-175.
    This paper is a discussion and critique of G. Harmon's interpretation of Ortega 's work, as set out in Harmon's "Guerrilla Metaphysics." I argue that while Harmon is right to point out Ortega 's critique of idealism, Ortega nevertheless remains a 'philosopher of access.' Ortega 's disagrees with the idealist i claim that we access reality through ideas, but agrees with the more basic point that philosophy ought to give an account of how we access reality.
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  9.  22
    Brian Harding (2009). The Virtue of Suicide and the Suicide of Virtue. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (1):95-111.
    This paper argues that suicide is very important for Cicero’s articulation and defense of the philosophical life. Happiness, according to Cicero, is dependent upon a willingness to commit suicide. I explain why this is the case through a discussion of On Ends and the Tusculan Disputations. I conclude with some critical remarks about Cicero’s argument, with reference to book XIX of Augustine’s City of God.
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  10.  13
    Brian Harding (2013). Christopher Watkin: Difficult Atheism: Post-Theological Thinking in Alain Badiou, Jean-Luc Nancy and Quentin Meillassoux. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 74 (3):359-362.
  11.  3
    Brian Harding (2015). The Kingdom and the Glory: For a Theological Genealogy of Economy and Government. By Giorgio Agamben; Trans. L. Chiesa with M. Mandarini. Pp. 303, Palo Alto, Stanford University Press, 2012, $24.95. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 56 (3):531-532.
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  12.  9
    Brian Harding (2008). The Use of Alexander the Great in Augustine's City of God. Augustinian Studies 39 (1):113-128.
    This paper discusses the various rhetorical and argumentative uses to which Augustine puts Alexander the Great in his City of God. I argue that Alexander is a particularly useful figure for Augustine insofar as he is both non-Roman and a figure greatly admired by the Romans. Because of this unique position, Augustine is able to use Alexander to examine and discredit certain ideals and character traits present to the Romans without alienating his audience. I examine, in detail, (...)
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  13.  7
    Brian Harding (2005). Subjectivity and Irreligion. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 59 (1):194-196.
    This is a short book review. The 'title' of the piece is the title of the book under review.
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  14.  10
    Brian Harding (2014). The Old and the New Phenomenology of Religion. Heythrop Journal 55 (4):533-544.
    This paper contrasts the 'old' phenomenology of religion, in the form of G. van der Leeuw, with the work of a representative 'new' phenomenologist of religion, M. Henry. The central contrast drawn in the paper is between van der Leeuw's understanding of "life" with that of Michel Henry, but some points about basic methodological differences are made as well.
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  15.  1
    Brian Harding (2005). Metaphysical Speculation and its Applicability to a Mode of Living: The Case of Boethius’De Consolatione Philosophiae. Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 9 (1):81-92.
    This paper argues that Boethius' De Consolatione Philosophiae presents theoretical metaphysical speculation as having a direct bearing on the life of the metaphysician. Boethius accomplishes this through his depiction of Lady Philosophy's `therapy' wherein complex metaphysical arguments are utilized to pull Boethius out of his depression, returning him to what she calls his true self. I begin the paper by contextualizing this discussion in terms of the debate as to whether or not the `philosophic life' of pagan antiquity is present (...)
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  16. Brian Harding (2015). Between the Canon and the Messiah: The Structure of Faith in Contemporary Continental Thought. By Colby Dickinson. Pp. 266, London: Bloomsbury, 2013, $37.95. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 56 (6):1088-1089.
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  17. Brian Harding (2010). Is Machiavelli's Discussion of the Eternity of the World Averroistic? Southwest Philosophical Studies 32:77-84.
    No, it is not Averroistic. Read the paper to find out why.
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  18. Brian Harding (2011). Privileging the Recipient of the Gift. Alea: Revista Internacional de Fenomenología y Hermenéutica 9:95-112.
    A substantial part of Marion’s project in Being Given turns on a “triple epoché” wherein Marion brackets each part of the tripartite structure of the gift – the giver, the recipient and the given itself – to show that none of them is essential for thinking about the gift. In three separate variations, each element of the gift is bracketed individually, and in each of these instances the other two elements are specifically not bracketed. Indeed, Marion admits that the reduction (...)
     
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  19. Brian Harding (2014). The Routledge Companion to Phenomenology. Edited by Sebastian Luft and Søren Overgaard . Pp. 716. London/NY, Routledge, 2012, $200.00. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 55 (4):720-721.
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  20. Brian Harding (2008). What is Minimalist Phenomenology? Alea:Alea: Revista Internacional de Fenomenología y Hermenéutica 6:161-181.
    In this paper I look at Dominique Janicaud’s proposal for a minimalist phenomenology. He develops this proposal in Phenomenology wide open, a sequel of sorts to his essay on the ‘Theological turn.’ Eschewing his polemics, I try to determine (a) the problem that he hopes minimalist phenomenology will solve; (b) the nature of this minimalism and how it differs from other approaches to phenomenology; and (c) critically evaluate some aspects of this minimalism, wondering if the gains of minimalist phenomenology are (...)
     
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