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  1. Brian K. Steverson (2012). Vulnerable Values Argument for the Professionalization of Business Management. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 31 (1):51-77.
    Market events of the past few years have resurrected long unheeded calls for the professionalization of the occupation of business manager, not in terms of increased technical proficiency, but in terms of a renewed vigor to shape the practice of management and the education of those who will fill its ranks along the lines of the “ideal of service” which characterizes socially established professions like law and medicine. In this paper I argue that the push to professionalize business management can (...)
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  2. Brian K. Steverson (2010). Joseph Raz, The Practice of Value Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 27 (2):141-142.
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  3. Brian K. Steverson (2009). Contextualism and Norton's Convergence Hypothesis. In Ben A. Minteer (ed.), Nature in Common?: Environmental Ethics and the Contested Foundations of Environmental Policy. Temple University Press. 135-150.
    Toward Unity among Environmentalists is Bryan Norton’s most developed effort to surmount the frequently intractable debate between anthropocentrists and nonanthropocentrists. Norton argues that the basic axiological differences between the two positions have become irrelevant at the level of policy formation. His thesis is that the two camps converge when dealing with practical goals and aims for environmental management. I argue that Norton’s approach falls significantly short of establishing such a convergence because of the overall methodological framework for policy formation that (...)
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  4. Brian K. Steverson (2008). Biogeography and Evolutionary Emotivism. Ethics, Place and Environment 11 (1):33 – 48.
    Emotivism has enjoined a revival of sorts over the past few decades, primarily driven by a Darwinian interpretation of the Humean metaethic. Evolutionary ethics, the metaethical view that at the heart of our moral sense lies a set of moral sentiments whose existence 'pre-dates' in evolutionary terms our species' ability to engage in more explicit, cognitive moral deliberations and discourse, whether in the discovery of deontological rules or in the crafting of social contracts, figures prominently in Robert Solomon's work in (...)
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  5. Brian K. Steverson (2003). Evolutionary Emotivism and the Land Ethic. Social Philosophy Today 19:65-77.
    In developing the metaethical foundation for the Land Ethic, J. Baird Callicott has relied on the cognitive plasticity and directionality of the moral sentiments in order to argue for an extension of those sentiments to the environment. As he sees it, reason plays a substantial role in determining which objects we direct those sentiments toward, and ecology has now shown to reason’s satisfaction that we are part of larger, land communities. In this essay, I would like to develop the claim (...)
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  6. Brian K. Steverson (1997). On Norton's Reply to Steverson. Environmental Ethics 19 (3):335-336.
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  7. Brian K. Steverson (1995). Contextualism and Norton's Convergence Hypothesis. Environmental Ethics 17 (2):135-150.
    Toward Unity among Environmentalists is Bryan Norton’s most developed effort to surmount the frequently intractable debate between anthropocentrists and nonanthropocentrists. Norton argues that the basic axiological differences between the two positions have become irrelevant at the level of policy formation. His thesis is that the two camps converge when dealing with practical goals and aims for environmental management. I argue that Norton’s approach falls significantly short of establishing such a convergence because of the overall methodological framework for policy formation that (...)
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  8. Brian K. Steverson (1994). David Rothenberg, Is It Painful to Think? Conversations with Arne Naess Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 14 (3):209-211.
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  9. Brian K. Steverson (1994). Donald Scherer, Ed., Upstream/Downstream: Issues in Environmental Ethics Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 14 (5):358-360.
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  10. Brian K. Steverson (1994). Ecocentrism and Ecological Modeling. Environmental Ethics 16 (1):71-88.
    Typical of ecocentric approaches such as the land ethic and the deep ecology movement is the use of concepts from ecological science to create an “ecoholistic” ontological foundation from which a strong environmental ethic is generated. Crucial to ecocentric theories is the assumption that ecological science has shown that humanity and nonhuman nature are essentially integrated into communal or communal-like arrangements. In this essay, I challenge the adequacy of that claim. I argue that for the most part the claim is (...)
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