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Brian L. Keeley [23]Brian Lee Keeley [1]
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Profile: Brian L. Keeley (Pitzer College)
  1. Brian L. Keeley (2002). Making Sense of the Senses: Individuating Modalities in Humans and Other Animals. Journal of Philosophy 99 (1):5-28.
    How ought we differentiate the senses? What, say, distinguishes vision from audition? The question comes in two versions. First, there is the traditional problem of individuating the senses in humans. Second, there is also an important question about what sensory modalities we ought to attribute to non-human animals, a version of the question that has been virtually ignored by philosophers. Modality ought to be construed as an “avenue into” an organism for information external to the central nervous system. Six proposed (...)
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  2.  43
    Brian L. Keeley (2000). Shocking Lessons From Electric Fish: The Theory and Practice of Multiple Realization. Philosophy of Science 67 (3):444-465.
    This paper explores the relationship between psychology and neurobiology in the context of cognitive science. Are the sciences that constitute cognitive science independent and theoretically autonomous, or is there a necessary interaction between them? I explore Fodor's Multiple Realization Thesis (MRT) which starts with the fact of multiple realization and purports to derive the theoretical autonomy of special sciences (such as psychology) from structural sciences (such as neurobiology). After laying out the MRT, it is shown that, on closer inspection, the (...)
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  3. Brian L. Keeley (1999). Of Conspiracy Theories. Journal of Philosophy 96 (3):109-126.
    As the end of the Millennium approaches, conspiracy theories are increasing in number and popularity. In this short essay, I offer an analysis of conspiracy theories inspired by Hume's discussion of miracles. My first conclusion is that whereas Hume can argue that miracles are, by definition, explanations we are not warranted in believing, there is nothing analytic that will allow us to distinguish good from bad conspiracy theories. There is no a priori method for distinguishing warranted conspiracy theories (say, those (...)
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  4.  3
    Brian L. Keeley (forthcoming). Tibor Solymosi and John R. Shook : Neuroscience, Neurophilosophy, and Pragmatism: Brains at Work with the World. Minds and Machines:1-6.
  5.  41
    Brian L. Keeley (2004). Anthropomorphism, Primatomorphism, Mammalomorphism: Understanding Cross-Species Comparisons. Biology and Philosophy 19 (4):521-540.
    The charge that anthropomorphizing nonhuman animals is a fallacy is itself largely misguided and mythic. Anthropomorphism in the study of animal behavior is placed in its original, theological context. Having set the historical stage, I then discuss its relationship to a number of other, related issues: the role of anecdotal evidence, the taxonomy of related anthropomorphic claims, its relationship to the attribution of psychological states in general, and the nature of the charge of anthropomorphism as a categorical claim. I then (...)
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  6.  10
    Brian L. Keeley, What Kinds of Kind Are the Senses?
    In Western common sense, one speaks of there being five human senses, a claim apparently challenged by the biological and psychological sciences. Part of this challenge comes in the form of claiming the existence of additional senses. Part of the challenge comes from positing multiple senses where common sense only speaks of one, such as with the fractionation of “touch” into pressure and temperature senses. One conceptual difficulty in thinking about the number and division of senses is that it's not (...)
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  7.  6
    Brian L. Keeley (2015). Speculative Fiction and the Philosophy of Perception. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 39 (1):169-181.
    After first noting that I seek to broaden the definition of science fiction to a little more loosely defined speculative fiction, this essay explores four different ways in which fiction can work together with both the sciences and the philosophy of perception. This cooperation is needed because there is much about the sensory worlds of humans and non-human animals of which we continue to be ignorant. First, speculative fiction can be a source of hypotheses about the nature of the senses. (...)
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  8.  91
    Brian L. Keeley (2007). God as the Ultimate Conspiracy Theory. Episteme 4 (2):135-149.
    Abstract Traditional secular conspiracy theories and explanations of worldly events in terms of supernatural agency share interesting epistemic features. This paper explores what can be called “supernatural conspiracy theories”, by considering such supernatural explanations through the lens of recent work on the epistemology of secular conspiracy theories. After considering the similarities and the differences between the two types of theories, the prospects for agnosticism both with respect to secular conspiracy theories and the existence of God are then considered. (...)
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  9.  40
    Brian L. Keeley (2003). Nobody Expects the Spanish Inquisition! More Thoughts on Conspiracy Theory. Journal of Social Philosophy 34 (1):104–110.
    Largely a response to Lee Basham’s essay “Malevolent Global Conspiracy.” After presenting an update on the status of conspiracy theories surrounding the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing, I agree with Basham that falsification and paranoia are not effective ways to criticize conspiratorial thinking. However, I am not convinced with the case Basham presents against worries that conspiracy theories often falter by overestimating the ability of large, public institutions to be secretly and effectively controlled. His appeal to the historical record can be (...)
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  10.  43
    Brian L. Keeley (2000). Neuroethology and the Philosophy of Cognitive Science. Philosophy of Science 60 (3):404-418.
    Neuroethology is a branch of biology that studies the neural basis of naturally occurring animal behavior. This science, particularly a recent program called computational neuroethology, has a similar structure to the interdisciplinary endeavor of cognitive science. I argue that it would be fruitful to conceive of cognitive science as the computational neuroethology of humans. However, there are important differences between the two sciences, including the fact that neuroethology is much more comparative in its perspective. Neuroethology is a biological science and (...)
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  11.  9
    Brian L. Keeley (ed.) (2005). Paul Churchland. Cambridge University Press.
    This collection offers an introduction to Churchland's work, as well as a critique of some of his most famous philosophical positions.
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  12.  14
    Brian L. Keeley (2011). Making Sense of the Senses: Individuating Modalities in Humans and Other Animals. In Fiona Macpherson (ed.), The Senses: Classic and Contemporary Philosophical Perspectives. Oxford University Press 220.
    After first noting that I seek to broaden the definition of science fiction to a little more loosely defined speculative fiction, this essay explores four different ways in which fiction can work together with both the sciences and the philosophy of perception. This cooperation is needed because there is much about the sensory worlds of humans and non-human animals of which we continue to be ignorant. First, speculative fiction can be a source of hypotheses about the nature of the senses. (...)
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  13.  37
    Brian L. Keeley (1998). Artificial Life for Philosophers. Philosophical Psychology 11 (2):251 – 260.
    Artificial life (ALife) is the attempt to create artificial instances of life in a variety of media, but primarily within the digital computer. As such, the field brings together computationally-minded biologists and biologically-minded computer scientists. I argue that this new field is filled with interesting philosophical issues. However, there is a dearth of philosophers actively conducting research in this area. I discuss two books on the new field: Margaret A. Boden's The philosophy of artificial life and Christopher G. Langton's Artificial (...)
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  14.  33
    Brian L. Keeley (1999). Fixing Content and Function in Neurobiological Systems: The Neuroethology of Electroreception. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 14 (3):395-430.
    Are attributions of content and function determinate, or is there no fact of the matter to be fixed? Daniel Dennett has argued in favor of indeterminacy and concludes that, in practice, content and function cannot be fixed. The discovery of an electrical modality in vertebrates offers one concrete instance where attributions of function and content are supported by a strong scientific consensus. A century ago, electroreception was unimagined, whereas today it is widely believed that many species of bony fish, amphibians, (...)
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  15.  29
    Brian L. Keeley (2002). Review of Leslie Brothers' Mistaken Identity: The Mind-Brain Problem Reconsidered (New York: Suny, 2001). [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 3 (3):409-412.
  16.  24
    Brian L. Keeley (1994). Against the Global Replacement: On the Application of the Philosophy of Artificial Intelligence to Artificial Life. In C. G. Langton (ed.), Artificial Life Iii: Proceedings of the Workshop on Artificial Life. Reading, Mass: Addison-Wesley
    This paper is a complement to the recent wealth of literature suggesting a strong philosophical relationship between artificial life (A-Life) and artificial intelligence (AI). I seek to point out where this analogy seems to break down, or where it would lead us to draw incorrect conclusions about the philosophical situation of A-Life. First, I sketch a thought experiment (based on the work of Tom Ray) that suggests how a certain subset of A-Life experiments should be evaluated. In doing so, I (...)
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  17. Brian L. Keeley (2009). Of tHe qUALE and Its relatIon to tHe Senses. In John Symons Paco Calvo (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Psychology. Routledge 71.
     
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  18.  36
    Brian L. Keeley (ed.) (2006). Paul Churchland. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    This collection offers an introduction to Churchland's work, as well as a critique of some of his most famous philosophical positions.
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  19.  1
    Brian L. Keeley (ed.) (2006). Paul Churchland. Cambridge University Press.
    For over three decades, Paul Churchland has been a provocative and controversial philosopher of mind and of science. He is most famous as an advocate of 'eliminative materialism', whereby he suggests that our commonsense understanding of our own minds is radically defective and that the science of brain demonstrates this. This collection offers an introduction to Churchland's work, as well as a critique of some of his most famous philosophical positions. Including contributions by both established and promising young philosophers, it (...)
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  20. Brian L. Keeley (ed.) (2012). Paul Churchland. Cambridge University Press.
    For over three decades, Paul Churchland has been a provocative and controversial philosopher of mind and of science. He is most famous as an advocate of 'eliminative materialism', whereby he suggests that our commonsense understanding of our own minds is radically defective and that the science of brain demonstrates this. This collection offers an introduction to Churchland's work, as well as a critique of some of his most famous philosophical positions. Including contributions by both established and promising young philosophers, it (...)
     
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  21. Brian L. Keeley (2009). The Early History of the Quale and Its Relation to the Senses. In John Symons & Paco Calvo (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Psychology. Routledge
     
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  22. William H. Krieger & Brian L. Keeley (2006). The Unexpected Realist. In Brian L. Keeley (ed.), Paul Churchland. Cambridge University Press
    There are two ways to do the unexpected. The banal way—let's call it the expectedly unexpected—is simply to chart the waters of what is and is not done, and then set out to do something different. For a philosopher, this can be done by embracing a method of non sequitor or by perhaps inverting some strongly held assumption of the field. The more interesting way— the unexpectedly unexpected—is to transform the expectations themselves; to do something new and contextualize it in (...)
     
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  23. Adam D. Roth, Eric Palmer, Anya Plutynski, Bridget Buxton, Steven C. Hatch, Sharyn Clough, Brian L. Keeley, Yuri Yamamoto, Lawrence Souder, Evelyn Brister, Kristen Intemann, Inmaculada de Melo-Martín & Glen Sanford (2011). Science at the Frontiers: Perspectives on the History and Philosophy of Science. Lexington Books.
    Compiled by an archaeologist and philosopher of science, Science at the Frontiers: Perspectives on the History and Philosophy of Science supplements current literature in the history and philosophy of science with essays approaching the traditional problems of the field from new perspectives and highlighting disciplines usually overlooked by the canon. William H. Krieger brings together scientists from a number of disciplines to answer these questions and more in a volume appropriate for both students and academics in the field.
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