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Profile: Brian L. Keeley (Pitzer College)
  1. Brian L. Keeley (2011). Making Sense of the Senses: Individuating. In Fiona Macpherson (ed.), The Senses: Classic and Contemporary Philosophical Perspectives. Oxford University Press. 220.
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  2. Brian L. Keeley (2009). Of tHe qUALE and Its relatIon to tHe Senses. In John Symons Paco Calvo (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Psychology. Routledge. 71.
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  3. Brian L. Keeley (2009). The Early History of the Quale and Its Relation to the Senses. In John Symons & Paco Calvo (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Psychology. Routledge.
     
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  4. Brian L. Keeley (2007). God as the Ultimate Conspiracy Theory. Episteme 4 (2):135-149.
    Abstract Traditional secular conspiracy theories and explanations of worldly events in terms of supernatural agency share interesting epistemic features. This paper explores what can be called “supernatural conspiracy theories”, by considering such supernatural explanations through the lens of recent work on the epistemology of secular conspiracy theories. After considering the similarities and the differences between the two types of theories, the prospects for agnosticism both with respect to secular conspiracy theories and the existence of God are then considered. Arguments regarding (...)
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  5. Brian L. Keeley (2006). Paul Churchland. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    This collection offers an introduction to Churchland's work, as well as a critique of some of his most famous philosophical positions.
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  6. William H. Krieger & Brian L. Keeley (2006). The Unexpected Realist. In Brian L. Keeley (ed.), Paul Churchland. Cambridge University Press.
    There are two ways to do the unexpected. The banal way—let's call it the expectedly unexpected—is simply to chart the waters of what is and is not done, and then set out to do something different. For a philosopher, this can be done by embracing a method of non sequitor or by perhaps inverting some strongly held assumption of the field. The more interesting way— the unexpectedly unexpected—is to transform the expectations themselves; to do something new and contextualize it in (...)
     
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  7. Brian L. Keeley (ed.) (2005). Paul Churchland. Cambridge University Press.
    This collection offers an introduction to Churchland's work, as well as a critique of some of his most famous philosophical positions.
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  8. Brian L. Keeley (2004). Anthropomorphism, Primatomorphism, Mammalomorphism: Understanding Cross-Species Comparisons. Biology and Philosophy 19 (4):521-540.
    The charge that anthropomorphizing nonhuman animals is a fallacy is itself largely misguided and mythic. Anthropomorphism in the study of animal behavior is placed in its original, theological context. Having set the historical stage, I then discuss its relationship to a number of other, related issues: the role of anecdotal evidence, the taxonomy of related anthropomorphic claims, its relationship to the attribution of psychological states in general, and the nature of the charge of anthropomorphism as a categorical claim. I then (...)
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  9. Brian L. Keeley (2003). Nobody Expects the Spanish Inquisition! More Thoughts on Conspiracy Theory. Journal of Social Philosophy 34 (1):104–110.
  10. Brian L. Keeley (2002). Making Sense of the Senses: Individuating Modalities in Humans and Other Animals. Journal Of Philosophy 99 (1):5-28.
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  11. Brian L. Keeley (2002). Review of Leslie Brothers' Mistaken Identity: The Mind-Brain Problem Reconsidered (New York: Suny, 2001). [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 3 (3):409-412.
  12. Brian L. Keeley (2000). Neuroethology and the Philosophy of Cognitive Science. Philosophy of Science 60 (3):404-418.
    Neuroethology is a branch of biology that studies the neural basis of naturally occurring animal behavior. This science, particularly a recent program called computational neuroethology, has a similar structure to the interdisciplinary endeavor of cognitive science. I argue that it would be fruitful to conceive of cognitive science as the computational neuroethology of humans. However, there are important differences between the two sciences, including the fact that neuroethology is much more comparative in its perspective. Neuroethology is a biological science and (...)
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  13. Brian L. Keeley (2000). Shocking Lessons From Electric Fish: The Theory and Practice of Multiple Realization. Philosophy Of Science 67 (3):444-465.
    This paper explores the relationship between psychology and neurobiology in the context of cognitive science. Are the sciences that constitute cognitive science independent and theoretically autonomous, or is there a necessary interaction between them? I explore Fodor's Multiple Realization Thesis (MRT) which starts with the fact of multiple realization and purports to derive the theoretical autonomy of special sciences (such as psychology) from structural sciences (such as neurobiology). After laying out the MRT, it is shown that, on closer inspection, the (...)
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  14. Brian L. Keeley (1999). Fixing Content and Function in Neurobiological Systems: The Neuroethology of Electroreception. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 14 (3):395-430.
    Are attributions of content and function determinate, or is there no fact of the matter to be fixed? Daniel Dennett has argued in favor of indeterminacy and concludes that, in practice, content and function cannot be fixed. The discovery of an electrical modality in vertebrates offers one concrete instance where attributions of function and content are supported by a strong scientific consensus. A century ago, electroreception was unimagined, whereas today it is widely believed that many species of bony fish, amphibians, (...)
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  15. Brian L. Keeley (1999). Of Conspiracy Theories. Journal of Philosophy 96 (3):109-126.
    Many millions of people hold conspiracy theories; they believe that powerful people have worked together in order to withhold the truth about some important practice or some terrible event. A recent example is the belief, widespread in some parts of the world, that the attacks of 9/11 were carried out not by Al Qaeda, but by Israel or the United States. Those who subscribe to conspiracy theories may create serious risks, including risks of violence, and the existence of such theories (...)
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  16. Brian L. Keeley (1998). Artificial Life for Philosophers. Philosophical Psychology 11 (2):251 – 260.
    Artificial life (ALife) is the attempt to create artificial instances of life in a variety of media, but primarily within the digital computer. As such, the field brings together computationally-minded biologists and biologically-minded computer scientists. I argue that this new field is filled with interesting philosophical issues. However, there is a dearth of philosophers actively conducting research in this area. I discuss two books on the new field: Margaret A. Boden's The philosophy of artificial life and Christopher G. Langton's Artificial (...)
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  17. Brian L. Keeley (1994). Against the Global Replacement: On the Application of the Philosophy of Artificial Intelligence to Artificial Life. In C. G. Langton (ed.), Artificial Life Iii: Proceedings of the Workshop on Artificial Life. Reading, Mass: Addison-Wesley.