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  1. Brian P. Copenhaver (forthcoming). A Tale of Two Fishes: Magical Objects in Natural History From Antiquity Through the Scientific Revolution. Journal of the History of Ideas.
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  2. Brian P. Copenhaver & Rebecca Copenhaver (2012). From Kant to Croce. University of Toronto Press.
    From around 1800, shortly before Pasquale Galluppi's first book, until 1950, just before Benedetto Croce died, the most formative influences on Italian philosophers were Kant and the post-Kantians, especially Hegel. In many ways, the Italian philosophers of this period lived in turbulent but creative times, from the Restoration to the Risorgimento and the rise and fall of Fascism. -/- From Kant to Croce is a comprehensive, highly readable history of the main currents and major figures of modern Italian philosophy, described (...)
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  3. Brian P. Copenhaver (2011). Lorenzo Valla, Scourge of Scholasticism: Nature, Power and Modality in the Dialectical Disputations. Rinascimento 51:3-26.
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  4. Brian P. Copenhaver & Rebecca Copenhaver (2008). How Croce Became a Philosopher. History of Philosophy Quarterly 25 (1):75 - 94.
  5. Brian P. Copenhaver (2007). As It Causes the Species of What is Artificially Made and Gets Power From the Stars.''94 SinceFicino Cites Several Texts by Thomas About Magicand Images, Includ-Ing the One That Describes Images as Quasi-Substantial Forms and Thus Quasi-Natural, His Failure to Make More of This Attractive Argument is Puzzling. In James Hankins (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Renaissance Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. 159.
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  6. Brian P. Copenhaver (2007). How to Do Magic, and Why: Philosophical Prescriptions. In James Hankins (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Renaissance Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. 137.
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  7. Brian P. Copenhaver (2007). Is a Metaphysical Recipe for Magic, for Drawing Power Down From That Super-Celestial Idea. 76 The World Soul Made the Figures That We See in the Heavens; Figures Are Patterns of Stars and Planets Joined by Rays of Light and Force Emitted by Heavenly Bodies. Stored in These Celestial Structures Are All Lower Species. The. [REVIEW] In James Hankins (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Renaissance Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. 155.
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  8. Brian P. Copenhaver (2007). Many Little Starlike Dots in a Row,''Was Probably a Calcified Marine Fossil–a Crinoid Stem (Fig. 8.5). Soaked with Strong Vinegar, the Apparently Lifeless Stone Bubbled and Moved About, Giving a Striking Demonstration of Power. In the Stone's Markings and Motions, Ficino Saw the Tracks of Draco, a Celestial Source for the Object's Liveliness. The Dragon-Stone Fascinated Him. [REVIEW] In James Hankins (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Renaissance Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. 152.
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  9. Brian P. Copenhaver (2006). Jewish Theologies of Space in the Scientific Revolution: Henry More, Joseph Raphson, Isaac Newton and Their Predecessors. Annals of Science 37 (5):489-548.
    (1980). Jewish theologies of space in the scientific revolution: Henry More, Joseph Raphson, Isaac Newton and their predecessors. Annals of Science: Vol. 37, No. 5, pp. 489-548.
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  10. Brian P. Copenhaver (2006). Maimonides, Abulafia and Pico. A Secret Aristotle for the Renaissance. Rinascimento 46:23-51.
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  11. Brian P. Copenhaver & Rebecca Copenhaver (2006). The Strange Italian Voyage of Thomas Reid: 1800-60. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (4):601 – 626.
  12. Brian P. Copenhaver (2005). Valla Our Contemporary: Philosophy and Philology. Journal of the History of Ideas 66 (4):507-525.
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  13. Brian P. Copenhaver (2004). How Not to Lose a Renaissance. Rinascimento 44:443-458.
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  14. Brian P. Copenhaver (2002). The Secret of Pico's Oration: Cabala and Renaissance Philosophy. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 26 (1):56–81.
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  15. Brian P. Copenhaver & Christopher Lawrence (1994). Hermetics: The Greek Corpus Hermeticum and the Latin Asctepius in a New British Translation, with Notes and Introduction. Annals of Science 51 (3):328.
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  16. Brian P. Copenhaver (1992). Renaissance Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    The Renaissance has long been recognized as a brilliant moment in the development of Western civilization. Little attention has been devoted, however, to the distinct contribution of philosophy to Renaissance culture. This volume introduces the reader to the philosophy written, read, taught, and debated during the period traditionally credited with the "revival of learning." Beginning with original sources still largely inaccessible to most readers, and drawing on a wide range of secondary studies, the author examines the relation of Renaissance philosophy (...)
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  17. Brian P. Copenhaver (1990). Sacralizing the Secular: The Renaissance Origins of Modernity (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 28 (4):611-613.
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  18. Brian P. Copenhaver (1988). Astrology and Magic. In Charles B. Schmitt, Quentin Skinner & Eckhard Kessler (eds.), The Cambridge History of Renaissance Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. 264--300.
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  19. Brian P. Copenhaver (1987). Science and Philosophy in Early Modern Europe: The Historiographical Significance of the Work of Charles B. Schmitt. Annals of Science 44 (5):507-517.
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  20. Brian P. Copenhaver (1981). The Magician, the Witch, and the Law. Journal of the History of Philosophy 19 (4):502-506.
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  21. Brian P. Copenhaver (1979). Magia E Ragione: Una Polemica Sulle Streghe in Italia Intorno Al 1750. Journal of the History of Philosophy 17 (1):98-101.
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  22. Brian P. Copenhaver (1978). The Historiography of Discovery in the Renaissance: The Sources and Composition of Polydore Vergil's de Inventoribus Rerum, I-III. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 41:192-214.
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  23. Brian P. Copenhaver (1977). LeFevre d'Etaples, Symphorien Champier, and the Secret Names of God. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 40:189-211.
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