Search results for 'Brian Prince' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Brian Prince (2012). The Form of Soul in the Phaedo. Plato 11 11.score: 240.0
    Although the Phaedo never mentions a Form of Soul explicitly, the dialogue implies this Form’s existence. First, a number of passages in which Socrates describes his views about Forms imply that there are very many Forms; thus, Socrates’ general description of his theory gives no ground for denying that there is a Form of Soul. Second, the final argument for immortality positively requires a Form of Soul.
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  2. Brian D. Prince (2013). Physical Change in Plato's Timaeus. Apeiron:1-19.score: 240.0
    In this paper I ask how Timaeus explains change within the trianglebased part of his cosmos. Two common views are that change among physical items is somehow caused or enabled by either the forms or the demiurge. I argue for a competing view, on which the physical items are capable of bringing about change by themselves, prior to the intervention of the demiurge, and prior to their being turned into imitations of the forms. I outline three problems for the view (...)
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  3. Brian D. Prince (2014). A. Longo and D. Del Forno (Eds.). International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 8 (1):123-125.score: 240.0
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  4. Brian Richardson (1995). The Prince and its Early Italian Readers. In Martin Coyle (ed.), Niccolò Machiavelli's the Prince: New Interdisciplinary Essays. Distributed Exclusively in the Usa and Canada by St. Martin's Press.score: 42.0
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  5. Steven Pinker & Alan Prince (1988). On Language and Connectionism. Cognition 28 (1-2):73-193.score: 30.0
  6. Sander M. Daselaar, Mathias S. Fleck, Steven E. Prince & Roberto Cabeza (2006). The Medial Temporal Lobe Distinguishes Old From New Independently of Consciousness. Journal of Neuroscience 26 (21):5835-5839.score: 30.0
  7. Morton Prince (1904). The Identification of Mind and Matter. Philosophical Review 13 (4):444-451.score: 30.0
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  8. Martin Coyle (ed.) (1995). Niccolò Machiavelli's the Prince: New Interdisciplinary Essays. Distributed Exclusively in the Usa and Canada by St. Martin's Press.score: 21.0
    This stimulating collection begins by outlining some of the complex problems The Prince raises as a cultural text. Then follow seven essays, ranging from the discussion of The Prince's first reception and its concern for history and dialogue, through the text's concern with language, power and gender, on to discussions of its contradictions and its place in cultural history.
     
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  9. Desiderius Erasmus (1997/1965). The Education of a Christian Prince. Cambridge University Press.score: 20.0
    The Education of a Christian Prince is a new student edition of Erasmus's crucial treatise on political theory. It contains a new, excerpted translation from his Panegyric, making it possible for the first time to compare two works which Erasmus himself regarded as closely related. The Education of a Christian Prince was published in 1516 and dedicated to Prince Charles, the future Emperor Charles V, and is one of the most influential books of the 'advice-to-princes' published in (...)
     
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  10. Joseph A. Kechichian (2003). The Just Prince: A Manual of Leadership: Including an Authoritative English Translation of the Sulwan Al-Mutaʻ Fi ʻudwan Al-Atba by Muhammad Ibn Zafar Al-Siqilli (Consolation for the Ruler During the Hostility of Subjects). Saqi.score: 20.0
    The Sulwan al-Muta' is an 800 year-old handbook for statesmen written by a Sicilian Arab who addressed this advice for a "just prince" based on Islamic morality, European realism and a broad-ranging knowledge of different cultures. The work is explicated using straight philosophical discourse as well as the narrative whirl of fables-within-fables so beloved of ancient and mediaeval Oriental literature. This is a work of practical political philosophy that combines penetrating contemporary analysis, the entertainment value of The Thousand and (...)
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  11. Roger Boesche (2002). Moderate Machiavelli? Contrasting the Prince with the Arthashastra of Kautilya. Critical Horizons 3 (2):253-276.score: 18.0
    Max Weber was the first to see that the writings of Machiavelli, when contrasted with the brutal realism of other cultural and political traditions, were not so extreme as they appear to some critics. "Truly radical 'Machiavellianism,' in the popular sense of that word,"Weber said in his famous lecture "Politics as a Vocation," "is classically expressed in Indian literature in the Arthashastra of Kautilya (written long before the birth of Christ, ostensibly in the time of Chandragupta [Maurya]): compared to it, (...)
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  12. Niccolo Machiavelli (2008). The Prince. The Modern Library.score: 18.0
    The first modern treatise of political philosophy, The Prince remains one of the world’s most influential and widely read books. Machiavelli, whose name has become synonymous with expedient exercises of will, reveals nothing less than the secrets of power: how to gain it, how to wield it, and how to keep it. But curiously, this work of outspoken clarity has, for centuries, inspired myriad interpretations as to its author’s true message. The Introduction by noted Italian Renaissance scholar Albert Russell (...)
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  13. Charles D. Tarlton (2002). Political Desire and the Idea of Murder in Machiavelli's the Prince. Philosophy 77 (1):39-66.score: 18.0
    Machiavelli's much advertised science of politics turns out, in the long run, to falter. Machiavelli's various stratagems for controlling political outcomes are workable a small percentage of the time at best. Unpredictability works continually against the theory of practical action. A large part of Machiavelli's adaptation to this deficiency is to turn at many crucial moments, to the unambiguous and startling clarity of murder as a political instrument. It is this central position of murder that helps to account for worrying (...)
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  14. Brian Davies (2006). Review of Thomas Aquinas, Brian Shanley, The Treatise on the Divine Nature, Summa Theologiae I, 1-13. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (6).score: 18.0
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  15. Brian Boyd (2007). Brian Boyd Responds:. Philosophy and Literature 31 (1):196-199.score: 18.0
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  16. Michael Devitt (1980). Brian Loar on Singular Terms. Philosophical Studies 37 (3):271 - 280.score: 18.0
    In "the semantics of singular terms," brian loar described and criticized a "causal" theory of reference and offered a new "description" theory. It is argued that the particular causal theory described is not to be found in the papers by donnellan and kripke cited as evidence for it, And is a straw man. Further "prima facie", Loar's new description theory fails to meet kripke's noncircularity condition. Should loar attempt to meet it, His theory is likely to run foul of (...)
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  17. Alex Callinicos (2006). Confronting a World Without Justice: Brian Barry's Why Social Justice Matters. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 9 (3):461-472.score: 18.0
    (2006). Confronting a World without Justice: Brian Barry’s Why Social Justice Matters. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy: Vol. 9, No. 3, pp. 461-472.
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  18. Stevan Harnad, First Person Singular: Review Of: Brian Rotman: Becoming Beside Ourselves: Alphabet, Ghosts, Distributed Human Beings. [REVIEW]score: 18.0
    Brian Rotman argues that (one) “mind” and (one) “god” are only conceivable, literally, because of (alphabetic) literacy, which allowed us to designate each of these ghosts as an incorporeal, speaker-independent “I” (or, in the case of infinity, a notional agent that goes on counting forever). I argue that to have a mind is to have the capacity to feel. No one can be sure which organisms feel, hence have minds, but it seems likely that one-celled organisms and plants do (...)
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  19. Rainer Kattel (forthcoming). Brian Leiter and Neil Sinhababu (Eds), Nietzsche and Morality. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice.score: 18.0
    Brian Leiter and Neil Sinhababu (eds), Nietzsche and Morality Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s10677-008-9134-6 Authors Rainer Kattel, Tallinn University of Technology Ehitajate tee 5 19086 Tallinn Estonia Journal Ethical Theory and Moral Practice Online ISSN 1572-8447 Print ISSN 1386-2820.
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  20. Branden Fitelson (1999). Review: Models and Reality-A Review of Brian Skyrms's Evolution of the Social Contract. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (1):237 - 241.score: 18.0
    Human beings are peculiar. In laboratory experiments, they often cooperate in one-shot prisoners’ dilemmas, they frequently offer 1/2 and reject low offers in the ultimatum game, and they often bid 1/2 in the game of divide-the-cake All these behaviors are puzzling from the point of view of game theory. The first two are irrational, if utility is measured in a certain way.1 The last isn’t positively irrational, but it is no more rational than other possible actions, since there are infinitely (...)
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  21. Michael Bacon (2003). Liberal Universalism: On Brian Barry and Richard Rorty. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 6 (2):41-62.score: 18.0
    At first sight it would seem difficult to find two philosophers as different as Brian Barry and Richard Rorty. It is widely held that the former is one of the most forceful proponents of liberal universalism, whereas the latter is typically viewed as the quintessential relativist. In this essay, different usages of the term univeralism are considered, and it is argued that Rorty's position is much closer to that of Barry than is generally supposed. Indeed, the article concludes by (...)
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  22. Martin Barrett, Ellery Eells, Branden Fitelson & Elliott Sober (1999). Review: Models and Reality-A Review of Brian Skyrms's Evolution of the Social Contract. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (1):237 - 241.score: 18.0
    Human beings are peculiar. In laboratory experiments, they often cooperate in one-shot prisoners’ dilemmas, they frequently offer 1/2 and reject low offers in the ultimatum game, and they often bid 1/2 in the game of divide-the-cake All these behaviors are puzzling from the point of view of game theory. The first two are irrational, if utility is measured in a certain way.1 The last isn’t positively irrational, but it is no more rational than other possible actions, since there are infinitely (...)
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  23. Bruno Latour, Graham Harman & Peter Erdélyi (eds.) (2011). The Prince and the Wolf: Latour and Harman at the LSE. Zero Books.score: 18.0
    The Prince and the Wolf contains the transcript of a debate which took place on February 5, 2008 at the London School of Economics (LSE) between the prominent French sociologist, anthropologist, and philosopher Bruno Latour and the Cairo-based American philosopher Graham Harman.
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  24. Joseph M. Rivera (2010). The Call and the Gifted in Christological Perspective: A Consideration of Brian Robinette's Critique of Jean-Luc Marion. Heythrop Journal 51 (6):1053-1060.score: 18.0
    In his recent article, ‘A Gift to Theology? Jean-Luc Marion's ‘Saturated Phenomena’ in Christological Perspective’, Brian Robinette has critiqued Marion's phenomenology for confining theology to a one-sided approach to Christology, one that stresses only the passive, mystical reception of Christ. To correct this imbalance, Robinette brings Marion into dialogue with those more active Christologies or ‘prophetical-ethical’ liberation theologies of Gustavo Gutierrez, Johann Baptist Metz and others that stress a life-praxis focused on confronting evil and suffering. In this essay I (...)
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  25. Niccolò Machiavelli (2007). Niccolò Machiavelli's the Prince on the Art of Power: The New Illustrated Edition of the Renaissance Masterpiece on Leadership. Distributed in the Usa and Canada by Sterling Pub. Co., Inc..score: 18.0
    With a scene-setting historical introduction, this newly translated and illustrated edition of a classic work is an essential addition to any home library. Written in 1512, The Prince is the masterpiece by Florentine political philosopher, poet, and playwright Niccolò Machiavelli. Although Machiavelli’s book has been frequently misunderstood as a manual for unprincipled manipulators and tyrants, careful reading reveals that it actually identifies freedom as an essential characteristic of a good society. In fact, much of Machiavelli’s republican thought can be (...)
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  26. Robert Sparling (2014). Le Prince et le problème de la corruption : réflexions sur une aporie machiavélienne. Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 9 (1):8-27.score: 18.0
    Dans les études sur la corruption politique, on trouve fréquemment des retours au lieu commun que les problèmes d’abus de charge publique en vue d’un intérêt privé ne peuvent être réglés sans la magie du leadership (l’anglicisme malheureux s’impose ici), cette qualité énigmatique de commandement qui saurait mettre en place les dispositifs d’incitatifs, de surveillance et de contrôle nécessaires pour contrer les abus. Mais un tel argument mène à une aporie, car les études qui placent ainsi leur confiance dans cet (...)
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  27. Niccolò Machiavelli (2007/2008). The Prince: Machiavelli's Description of the Methods of Murder Adopted by Duke Valentino & the Life of Castruccio Castracani. Arc Manor Publishers.score: 18.0
    The first modern treatise of political philosophy, The Prince remains one of the world’s most influential and widely read books. Machiavelli, whose name has become synonymous with expedient exercises of will, reveals nothing less than the secrets of power: how to gain it, how to wield it, and how to keep it. But curiously, this work of outspoken clarity has, for centuries, inspired myriad interpretations as to its author’s true message. The Introduction by noted Italian Renaissance scholar Albert Russell (...)
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  28. Carolina Sartorio, The Prince of Wales Problem for Counterfactual Theories of Causation.score: 18.0
    In 1992, as part of a larger charitable campaign, the Prince of Wales (Prince Charles, Queen Elizabeth’s older son and heir) launched a line of organic food products called “Prince’s Duchy Originals”.1 The first product that went on sale was an oat cookie: “the oaten biscuit.” Since then the oaten biscuit has been joined by hundreds of other products and Duchy Originals has become one of the leading organic food brands in the UK. Presumably, the Prince (...)
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  29. Brian Davies (2006). Review of Brian Hebblethwaite, Philosophical Theology and Christian Doctrine. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (1).score: 18.0
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  30. Graham Harman (2009). Prince of Networks: Bruno Latour and Metaphysics. re.press.score: 18.0
    Prince of Networks is the first treatment of Bruno Latour specifically as a philosopher. It has been eagerly awaited by readers of both Latour and Harman since their public discussion at the London School of Economics in February 2008. Part One covers four key works that display Latour’s underrated contributions to metaphysics: Irreductions, Science in Action, We Have Never Been Modern, and Pandora’s Hope. Harman contends that Latour is one of the central figures of contemporary philosophy, with a highly (...)
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  31. Niccolò Machiavelli (1640/1969). The Prince. Menston, Eng.,Scolar Press.score: 18.0
    The first modern treatise of political philosophy, The Prince remains one of the world’s most influential and widely read books. Machiavelli, whose name has become synonymous with expedient exercises of will, reveals nothing less than the secrets of power: how to gain it, how to wield it, and how to keep it. But curiously, this work of outspoken clarity has, for centuries, inspired myriad interpretations as to its author’s true message. The Introduction by noted Italian Renaissance scholar Albert Russell (...)
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  32. Kendall D'Andrade (1993). Machiavelli's Prince as CEO. Business Ethics Quarterly 3 (4):395-404.score: 18.0
    The Machiavellian model is often praised as a realistic description of modern corporate life. My analysis of Tne Prince follows Rousseau in arguing that the prince can survive and prosper most easily by creating an environment in which almost all the citizens prosper. Far from licensing unrestrained self-aggrandizement, in this model success only comes from providing real value to almost every citizen for the entire period of one's leadership.Translation from the early sixteenth to the late twentieth century is (...)
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  33. G. Crowder (2008). Berlin, Value Pluralism and the Common Good: A Reply to Brian Trainor. Philosophy and Social Criticism 34 (8):925-939.score: 18.0
    Brian Trainor argues that the current hostility of political theorists towards the idea of the common good is in part due to the influence of Isaiah Berlin's concept of `value pluralism', or the incommensurability of basic human values. I agree with Trainor's opposition to the `agonistic' interpretation of pluralism, associated with thinkers like Chantal Mouffe. However, it is not the case that the only alternative to the pluralism— agonism thesis is the monist defence of a thick common good advocated (...)
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  34. Amber Foster (2013). Nancy Prince's Utopias: Reimagining the African American Utopian Tradition. Utopian Studies 24 (2):329-348.score: 18.0
    Nancy Gardner Prince began writing and self-publishing A Narrative of the Life and Travels of Mrs. Nancy Prince in the 1850s, at a time when few African American women had the ability to do so. Her story tells of diaspora and of the systematic economic, cultural, and political oppression of free African Americans in the antebellum North. Raised by a mother unable to cope with the economic and emotional burden of raising eight children on her own, Prince (...)
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  35. Peter D. Thomas (2013). Hegemony, Passive Revolution and the Modern Prince. Thesis Eleven 117 (1):20-39.score: 18.0
    Gramsci’s concept of hegemony has been interpreted in a wide variety of ways, including a theory of consent, of political unity, of ‘anti-politics’, and of geopolitical competition. These interpretations are united in regarding hegemony as a general theory of political power and domination, and as deriving from a particular interpretation of the concept of passive revolution. Building upon the recent intense season of philological research on the Prison Notebooks, this article argues that the concept of hegemony is better understood as (...)
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  36. Peter Breiner (2008). Machiavelli's "New Prince" and the Primordial Moment of Acquisition. Political Theory 36 (1):66 - 92.score: 18.0
    Commentators have frequently noted the discrepancy in il Principle between the figure of the new prince and the impossibility of exemplifying him. Against interpretations that claim Machiavelli's text either traps a prince in a web of self-destructive advice or destabilizes the very political knowledge it provides, the author argues that it uses the figure of the new prince to locate us in the primordial moment of acquisition of political power, a moment that is never overcome but is (...)
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  37. William A. Dembski, Addicted to Caricatures: A Response to Brian Charlesworth.score: 18.0
    One prominent evolutionist I know confided in me that he sometimes spends only an hour perusing a book that he has to review. I doubt if Brian Charlesworth spent even that much time with my book No Free Lunch. Charlesworth is a bright guy and could have done better. But no doubt he is also a busy guy. To save time and effort, it's therefore easier to put these crazy intelligent design creationists in their place rather than actually engage (...)
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  38. Geoff Hunt, The Patrick O'Brian Novels.score: 18.0
    Patrick O'Brian, the Aubrey-Maturin Series of twenty novels (Norton, 1970-1999). My appreciation written for WIRED magazine: "I re-read this extraordinary series of novels because of the depth of portrayal of the major and minor characters, but also because they teach me so much about what science and technology were like two centuries ago. O'Brian shows you the world-that-was through the eyes of a Tory naval captain (Jack Aubrey), at sea since the age of 12, working his way up (...)
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  39. Sydney Penner (2013). 'The Pope and Prince of All the Metaphysicians': Some Recent Works on Suárez. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (2):393 - 403.score: 18.0
    (2013). ‘The Pope and Prince of All the Metaphysicians’: Some Recent Works on Suárez. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 21, No. 2, pp. 393-403. doi: 10.1080/09608788.2013.771251.
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  40. Lloyd F. Bitzer (1998). The "Indian Prince" in Miracle Arguments of Hume and His Predecessors and Early Critics. Philosophy and Rhetoric 31 (3):175 - 230.score: 18.0
    This essay examines miracle arguments employing Hume?s "Indian prince" (Locke?s "king of Siam," Butler?s "prince") in works from Locke to Richard Price, and explains the relation of those arguments to Hume?s "Of Miracles." Miracle advocates aimed to weaken the authority of uniform experience and strengthen testimony, but their arguments, more skeptical than Hume?s, undermined their case for miracles. Hume?s early critics objected that: by his theory, no novel facts, including miracles, can be inferred; he mistakenly collapsed testimony into (...)
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  41. Brian Gregor (2011). Niels Jørgen Cappelørn, Alastair Hannay, David Kangas, Bruce H. Kirmmse, George Pattison, Vanessa Rumble, and K. Brian Söderquist, Eds. , Kierkegaard's Journals and Notebooks Volume 3: Notebooks 1-15 . Reviewed By. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 31 (2):107-110.score: 18.0
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  42. Brian Teare (2013). Brian Teare, From The Empty Form Goes All the Way to Heaven. Journal of Medical Humanities 34 (2):277-281.score: 18.0
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  43. Zoltan Balazs (2014). From Fame to Glory. The Case of Prince Friedrich of Homburg. Philosophical Investigations 37 (4):328-349.score: 18.0
    The paper examines the value of glory and offers a conception of it, which is developed by criticising other accounts and by arguing that the Homeric and the Biblical traditions have a remarkably similar, converging view on glory. A more detailed analysis of Heinrich von Kleist's The Prince Friedrich of Homburg serves to deepen this view and outline an account of glory that rests on the following claims: it is different from, although not entirely opposite to, fame; it is (...)
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  44. Brian Bany (1999). An Interview With Professor Brian Barry. Cogito 13 (2):77-85.score: 18.0
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  45. Erica Benner (2013). Machiavelli's Prince: A New Reading. Oup Oxford.score: 18.0
    This book gives a radical, new, chapter-by-chapter reading of Machiavelli's The Prince, arguing that it is an ironic masterpiece with a moral purpose. It outlines Machiavelli's most important ironic techniques: a normatively coded use of language.
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  46. Adam Michnik (2010). The Prince and the Pauper in Strange Communion with Leszek Kołakowski. Common Knowledge 16 (2):177-197.score: 18.0
    This memorial to Leszek Kołakowski by perhaps his most famous student—a cofounder of the Solidarity movement—treats Kołakowski's life story only in passing. Not a conventional eulogy, the essay runs extensively through several of the arguments Kołakowski made over the years that taught the Polish “Generation of `68” how best to undo oppression and why they should do so. Emphasis falls on the difficulty, unpredictability, and unclassifiable features of Kołakowski's writings—features that, paradoxically, did not stand in the way of his becoming (...)
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  47. Daniel Kapust (2007). Cato's Virtues and The Prince: Readin Sallust's War with Catiline with Machiavelli's The Prince. History of Political Thought 28 (3):433-448.score: 18.0
    This paper explores the relationship between Machiavelli's The Prince and Sallust's War with Catiline. In particular, I will argue that Sallust's War with Catiline, and especially the debate between Cato and Caesar over the treatment of the Catilinarian conspirators, provide both a model and a source for portions of Machiavelli's The Prince often held to be most inconsistent with classical thought. Moreover, I will argue that Machiavelli, in describing his ideal prince and the attributes he should adopt, (...)
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  48. Niccolò Machiavelli (2014). The Prince and Other Writings. Canterbury Classics, Baker & Taylor Publishing Group.score: 18.0
    One of the foremost examples of modern philosophy, Niccolò Machiavelli’s The Prince is notorious for the morality it expounds, often summarized by the phrase, “The end justifies the means.” With The Prince , Machiavelli’s intent was to provide practical advice for rulers and politicians, especially in regard to the unification of Italy. The Prince and Other Writings is an important book for those interested in history, politics, ethics, and human nature, and is now available as part of (...)
     
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  49. Brian Merrilees (1992). David L. Jeffrey and Brian J. Levy, Eds. And Trans., The Anglo-Norman Lyric: An Anthology.(Studies and Texts, 93.) Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, 1990. Paper. Pp. Xiii, 285. $31.50. [REVIEW] Speculum 67 (2):431-433.score: 18.0
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  50. Keith M. Dowding, Robert E. Goodin, Carole Pateman & Brian Barry (eds.) (2004). Justice and Democracy: Essays for Brian Barry. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    While much has been written about social justice, even more has been written about democracy. Rarely is the relationship between social justice and democracy carefully considered. Does justice require democracy? Will democracy bring justice? This volume brings together leading authors who consider the relationship of democracy and justice. The intrinsic justness of democracy is challenged and the relationship between justice, democracy and the common good examined.
     
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