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  1. Misao Fujita, Brian Taylor Slingsby & Akira Akabayashi (2010). Transplant Tourism From Japan. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (2):24-26.
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  2. Akira Akabayashi, Satoshi Kodama & Brian Taylor Slingsby (2008). Is Asian Bioethics Really the Solution? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (03):270-272.
    Today Asia is attracting attention in the area of bioethics. In fact, the potential of bioethics is beginning to be discussed seriously at academic centers across Asia. In Japan, this discussion began a decade ago with the publication The book is one of the principal explorations of biomedical ethics involving Japan to date. Tom Beauchamp, an author of one of the book's chapters, compares Japanese and American standards of informed consent and refutes relativistic positions, concluding that.
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  3. Akira Akabayashi, Brian Taylor Slingsby, Noriko Nagao, Ichiro Kai & Hajime Sato (2008). A Five Year Follow-Up National Study of Ethics Committees in Medical Organizations in Japan. HEC Forum 20 (1):49-60.
    Compared to institutional and area-based ethics committees, little is known about the structure and activities performed by ethics committees at national medical organizations and societies. This five year follow-up study aimed to determine (1) the creation and function of ethics committees at medical organizations in Japan, and (2) their general strategies to deal with ethical problems. The study sample included the member societies of the Japanese Association of Medical Sciences (n=92 in 1998, n=96 in 2003). Instruments consisted of two sections: (...)
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  4. Akira Akabayashi & Brian Taylor Slingsby (2006). Informed Consent Revisited: Japan and the U.S. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (1):9 – 14.
    Informed consent, decision-making styles and the role of patient-physician relationships are imperative aspects of clinical medicine worldwide. We present the case of a 74-year-old woman afflicted with advanced liver cancer whose attending physician, per request of the family, did not inform her of her true diagnosis. In our analysis, we explore the differences in informed-consent styles between patients who hold an "independent" and "interdependent" construal of the self and then highlight the possible implications maintained by this position in the context (...)
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  5. Akira Akabayashi & Brian Taylor Slingsby (2006). Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Informed Consent Revisited: Japan and the US”. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (1):W27-W28.
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  6. John R. Klune Jonsen, Marta Kolthopp, Gilbert Meilander Lawry, Jonathan Moreno, David Resnik, Brian Taylor Slingsby & J. Robert Thompson (2006). The Editors Wish to Express Their Appreciation to the Following Individuals Who, Though Not Members of the Advisory Board, Generously Reviewed Manuscripts for The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy During 2005: Holly Anderson, Nicholas Capaldi, Alfonso Gomez-Lobo, John R. Graham, Albert. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (323).
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  7. Brian Taylor Slingsby (2006). Professional Approaches to Stroke Treatment in Japan: A Relationship‐Centred Model. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (2):218-226.
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  8. Brian Taylor Slingsby, Satoshi Kodama & Akira Akabayashi (2006). Scientific Misconduct in Japan: The Present Paucity of Oversight Policy. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (03):294-297.
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  9. Akira Akabayashi, Brian Taylor Slingsby & Yoshiyuki Takimoto (2005). Conflict of Interest: A Japanese Perspective. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14 (3):277-280.
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  10. Brian Taylor Slingsby (2005). The Nature of Relative Subjectivity: A Reflexive Mode of Thought. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (1):9 – 25.
    Ethical principles including autonomy, justice and equality function in the same paradigm of thought, that is, logocentrism - an epistemological predilection that relies on the analytic power of deciphering between binary oppositions. By studying observable behavior with an analytical approach, however, one immediately limits any recognition and possible understanding of modes of thought based on separate epistemologies. This article seeks to reveal an epistemological predilection that diverges from logocentrism yet continues to function as a fundamental component of ethical behavior. The (...)
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