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Richard S. Briggs [46]George E. Briggs [21]Rachael Briggs [19]Richard Briggs [11]
Jean L. Briggs [11]Asa Briggs [9]Ward Briggs [7]Charles F. Briggs [6]

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Profile: Rachael Briggs (Australian National University)
Profile: Roman Briggs (University of Arkansas, Fayetteville)
Profile: Adam Charles Briggs (Griffith University)
Profile: Carole M Briggs
Profile: Chuckie Briggs
Profile: Elysa Briggs (Syracuse University)
Profile: Jan Briggs
Profile: Katy Briggs (University of Essex)
Profile: Lowell Briggs (York College)
Profile: Robert Briggs (University of Leeds)
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  1. Richard S. Briggs (2004). Words in Action: Speech Act Theory and Biblical Interpretation. Ars Disputandi 4.
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  2. Rachael Briggs (2012). Interventionist Counterfactuals. Philosophical Studies 160 (1):139-166.
    A number of recent authors (Galles and Pearl, Found Sci 3 (1):151–182, 1998; Hiddleston, Noûs 39 (4):232–257, 2005; Halpern, J Artif Intell Res 12:317–337, 2000) advocate a causal modeling semantics for counterfactuals. But the precise logical significance of the causal modeling semantics remains murky. Particularly important, yet particularly under-explored, is its relationship to the similarity-based semantics for counterfactuals developed by Lewis (Counterfactuals. Harvard University Press, 1973b). The causal modeling semantics is both an account of the truth conditions of counterfactuals, and (...)
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  3. Rachael Briggs (2009). Distorted Reflection. Philosophical Review 118 (1):59-85.
    Diachronic Dutch book arguments seem to support both conditionalization and Bas van Fraassen's Reflection principle. But the Reflection principle is vulnerable to numerous counterexamples. This essay addresses two questions: first, under what circumstances should an agent obey Reflection, and second, should the counterexamples to Reflection make us doubt the Dutch book for conditionalization? In response to the first question, this essay formulates a new "Qualified Reflection" principle, which states that an agent should obey Reflection only if he or she is (...)
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  4.  28
    Rachael Briggs (2015). Transformative Experience and Interpersonal Utility Comparisons. Res Philosophica 92 (2):189-216.
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  5. Rachael Briggs & Daniel Nolan (2015). Utility Monsters for the Fission Age. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 96 (2):392-407.
    One of the standard approaches to the metaphysics of personal identity has some counter-intuitive ethical consequences when combined with maximising consequentialism and a plausible doctrine about aggregation of consequences. This metaphysical doctrine is the so-called ‘multiple occupancy’ approach to puzzles about fission and fusion. It gives rise to a new version of the ‘utility monster’ problem, particularly difficult problems about infinite utility, and a new version of a Parfit-style ‘repugnant conclusion’. While the article focuses on maximising consequentialism for simplicity, the (...)
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  6.  80
    Rachael Briggs (forthcoming). Foundations of Probability. Journal of Philosophical Logic:1-16.
    The foundations of probability are viewed through the lens of the subjectivist interpretation. This article surveys conditional probability, arguments for probabilism, probability dynamics, and the evidential and subjective interpretations of probability.
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  7. Rachel Briggs & Daniel Nolan (2012). Epistemic Dispositions. Reply to Turri and Bronner. Logos and Episteme 3 (4):629-636.
    We reply to recent papers by John Turri and Ben Bronner, who criticise the dispositionalised Nozickian tracking account we discuss in “Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Know.” We argue that the account we suggested can handle the problems raised by Turri and Bronner. In the course of responding to Turri and Bronner’s objections, we draw three general lessons for theories of epistemic dispositions: that epistemic dispositions are to some extent extrinsic, that epistemic dispositions can have manifestation conditions concerning circumstances where (...)
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  8.  2
    Derek E. G. Briggs & Roger E. Summons (2014). Ancient Biomolecules: Their Origins, Fossilization, and Role in Revealing the History of Life. Bioessays 36 (5):482-490.
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  9. Rachael Briggs (2010). Decision-Theoretic Paradoxes as Voting Paradoxes. Philosophical Review 119 (1):1-30.
    It is a platitude among decision theorists that agents should choose their actions so as to maximize expected value. But exactly how to define expected value is contentious. Evidential decision theory (henceforth EDT), causal decision theory (henceforth CDT), and a theory proposed by Ralph Wedgwood that this essay will call benchmark theory (BT) all advise agents to maximize different types of expected value. Consequently, their verdicts sometimes conflict. In certain famous cases of conflict—medical Newcomb problems—CDT and BT seem to get (...)
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  10. Rachael Briggs & Graeme A. Forbes (2012). The Real Truth About the Unreal Future. In Karen Bennett & Dean Zimmerman (eds.), Oxford Studies in Metaphysics, volume 7.
    Growing-Block theorists hold that past and present things are real, while future things do not yet exist. This generates a puzzle: how can Growing-Block theorists explain the fact that some sentences about the future appear to be true? Briggs and Forbes develop a modal ersatzist framework, on which the concrete actual world is associated with a branching-time structure of ersatz possible worlds. They then show how this branching structure might be used to determine the truth values of future contingents. They (...)
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  11. Rachael Briggs & Mark Jago (2012). Propositions and Same-Saying: Introduction. Synthese 189 (1):1-10.
    Philosophers often talk about the things we say, or believe, or think, or mean. The things are often called ‘propositions’. A proposition is what one believes, or thinks, or means when one believes, thinks, or means something. Talk about propositions is ubiquitous when philosophers turn their gaze to language, meaning and thought. But what are propositions? Is there a single class of things that serve as the objects of belief, the bearers of truth, and the meanings of utterances? How do (...)
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  12. Rachael Briggs (2012). Truthmaking Without Necessitation. Synthese 189 (1):11-28.
    I propose an account truthmaking that provides truthmakers for negative truths. The account replaces Truthmaker Necessitarianism with a "Duplication Principle", according to which a suitable entity T is a truthmaker for a proposition P just in case the existence of an appropriate counterpart of T entails the truth of P, where the counterpart relation is cashed out in terms of qualitative duplication. My account captures an intuitive notion of truthmakers as "things the way they are", validates two appealing principles about (...)
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  13. Rachael Briggs & Daniel Nolan (2012). Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Know. Analysis 72 (2):314-316.
    Tracking accounts of knowledge formulated in terms of counterfactuals suffer from well known problems. Examples are provided, and it is shown that moving to a dispositional tracking theory of knowledge avoids three of these problems.
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  14.  12
    Rachael Briggs (2016). Costs of Abandoning the Sure-Thing Principle. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 45 (5-6):827-840.
    Risk-weighted expected utility theory permits preferences which violate the Sure-Thing Principle. But preferences that violate the STP can lead to bad decisions in sequential choice problems. In particular, they can lead decision-makers to adopt a strategy that is dominated – i.e. a strategy such that some available alternative leads to a better outcome in every possible state of the world.
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  15. Rachael Briggs (2009). The Anatomy of the Big Bad Bug. Noûs 43 (3):428-449.
  16. Rachael Briggs (2009). The Big Bad Bug Bites Anti-Realists About Chance. Synthese 167 (1):81--92.
    David Lewis’s ‘Humean Supervenience’ (henceforth ‘HS’) combines realism about laws, chances, and dispositions with a sparse ontology according to which everything supervenes on the overall spatiotemporal distribution of non-dispositional properties (Lewis 1986a, Philosophical papers: Volume II, pp. ix–xvii, New York: Oxford Univesity Press, 1994, Mind 103:473–490). HS faces a serious problem—a “big bad bug” (Lewis 1986a, p. xiv): it contradicts the Principal Principle, a seemingly obvious norm of rational credence. Two authors have tried to rescue Lewis’s ontology from the ‘big (...)
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  17. Rachael Briggs & Daniel Nolan (2012). Epistemic Dispositions. Logos and Episteme 3 (4):629-636.
    We reply to recent papers by John Turri and Ben Bronner, who criticise the dispositionalised Nozickian tracking account we discuss in “Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Know.” We argue that the account we suggested can handle the problems raised by Turri and Bronner. In the course of responding to Turri and Bronner’s objections, we draw three general lessons for theories of epistemic dispositions: that epistemic dispositions are to some extent extrinsic, that epistemic dispositions can have manifestation conditions concerning circumstances where (...)
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  18. Rachael Briggs (2010). The Metaphysics of Chance. Philosophy Compass 5 (11):938-952.
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  19. Rachael Briggs (2010). Putting a Value on Beauty. In Tamar Szabo Gendler and John Hawthorne (Eds.), Oxford Studies in Epistemology, Volume 3. Oxford University Press:3-34.
     
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  20.  16
    James C. Naylor & George E. Briggs (1963). Effects of Task Complexity and Task Organization on the Relative Efficiency of Part and Whole Training Methods. Journal of Experimental Psychology 65 (3):217.
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  21.  88
    Richard Briggs (2010). Book Review: David L. Baker, Tight Fists or Open Hands? Wealth and Poverty in Old Testament Law (Grand Rapids, MI and Cambridge: Eerdmans, 2009) Xxiv + 411 Pp, £23.99/$36 (Pb), ISBN 978—0—8028—6283—9. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 23 (4):452-454.
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  22. Roman Briggs (2009). The Greening of Heart and Mind: A Love Story. Environmental Ethics 31 (2):155-168.
    Some environmentalists have argued that an effective ecological conscience may be rooted in a perspective that is either anthropocentric or sentiocentric. But, neither seems to have had any substantial effect on the ways in which our species treats nature. In looking to successfully awaken the ecological conscience, the focus should be on extending moral consideration to the land (wherein doing so includes all of the soils, waters, plants, animals, and the collectivity of which these things comprise) by means of coming (...)
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  23.  13
    Christopher Monckton of Brenchley, William Briggs, Willie Soon & David Legates (2015). Climate Consensus and ‘Misinformation’: A Rejoinder to Agnotology, Scientific Consensus, and the Teaching and Learning of Climate Change. Science and Education 24 (3):299-318.
    Agnotology is the study of how ignorance arises via circulation of misinformation calculated to mislead. Legates et al. had questioned the applicability of agnotology to politically-charged debates. In their reply, Bedford and Cook, seeking to apply agnotology to climate science, asserted that fossil-fuel interests had promoted doubt about a climate consensus. Their definition of climate ‘misinformation’ was contingent upon the post-modernist assumptions that scientific truth is discernible by measuring a consensus among experts, and that a near unanimous consensus exists. However, (...)
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  24.  6
    L. A. Briggs (1998). Female Circumcision in Nigeria: Is It Not Time for Government Intervention? [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 6 (1):14-23.
    This paper examines the attitudes of circumcised women towards female circumcision in a community where the practice is in vogue. Also described are the type of circumcision performed, who usually performs the circumcision and complications. One hundred volunteers across the social strata were interviewed by means of a structured questionnaire. Data were analysed using frequency tables. The study revealed that 62% of respondents favoured the practice as an instrument for the control of female sexuality and maintenance of cultural pride. Circumcision (...)
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  25.  12
    G. A. D. Briggs, J. Butterfield & A. Zeilinger, The Oxford Questions on the Foundations of Quantum Physics.
    The twentieth century saw two fundamental revolutions in physics—relativity and quantum. Daily use of these theories can numb the sense of wonder at their immense empirical success. Does their instrumental effectiveness stand on the rock of secure concepts or the sand of unresolved fundamentals? Does measuring a quantum system probe, or even create, reality, or merely change belief? Must relativity and quantum theory just co-exist or might we find a new theory which unifies the two? To bring such questions into (...)
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  26.  12
    Richard A. Fortey, Derek E. G. Briggs & Matthew A. Wills (1997). The Cambrian Evolutionary 'Explosion' Recalibrated. Bioessays 19 (5):429-434.
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  27.  12
    George W. Briggs (1935). Evolution of Hindu Moral Ideals. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 32 (23):642-643.
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  28.  54
    Rachael Briggs (2012). The Normative Standing of Group Agents. Episteme 9 (3):283-291.
    Christian List and Philip Pettit argue that groups of people can be agents – beings that believe, desire and act. Their account combines a non-reductive realist view of group attitudes, on which groups literally have attitudes that cannot be analyzed in terms of the attitudes of their members, with methodological individualism, on which good explanations of group-level phenomena should not posit forces above individual attitudes and behaviors. I then discuss the main normative conclusion that LP draw from the claim that (...)
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  29. John C. Briggs (1989). Francis Bacon and the Rhetoric of Nature. Harvard University Press.
  30.  39
    John S. Briggs & Jan M. Rost (2001). On the Derivation of the Time-Dependent Equation of Schrödinger. Foundations of Physics 31 (4):693-712.
    Few have done more than Martin Gutzwiller to clarify the connection between classical time-dependent motion and the time-independent states of quantum systems. Hence it seems appropriate to include the following discussion of the origins of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in this volume dedicated to him.
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  31.  81
    Rachael Briggs (2009). Being For: Evaluating the Semantic Program of Expressivism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 87 (4):690-691.
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  32.  11
    Robert Briggs (2009). Shameless! Angelaki 14 (1):65 – 75.
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  33.  7
    George W. Briggs (1931). Hinduism Invades America. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 28 (22):612-614.
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  34.  7
    George W. Briggs (1934). Insights Into Modern Hinduism. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 31 (24):669-670.
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  35.  6
    J. Briggs (1991). Consent and the Incompetent Patient: Ethics, Law and Medicine. Journal of Medical Ethics 17 (1):49-50.
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  36. John Briggs (1984/1985). Looking Glass Universe: The Emerging Science of Wholeness. Fontana Paperbacks.
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  37.  13
    Martin S. Briggs (1927). The Architect in History. Journal of Hellenic Studies 47:269.
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  38.  4
    James M. Swanson & George E. Briggs (1969). Information Processing as a Function of Speed Versus Accuracy. Journal of Experimental Psychology 81 (2):223.
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  39.  7
    Robert Briggs (2001). Wild Thoughts: A Deconstructive Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 23 (2):115-134.
    Although environmental ethics has become more familiar and comfortable with the work of postmodernism, “deconstruction” in particular continues to be depicted as “destructive” and “nihilistic.” A close examination of some specific works of deconstruction, however, shows that, far from denying responsibilities to the environment, deconstruction seeks to affirm a radical obligation toward the “other.” Because this possibility is habitually ruled out by denunciations of deconstruction’s imputed relativism, I begin with a dramatized account of the possible reception of deconstruction within environmental (...)
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  40.  11
    Richard S. Briggs (2013). Religion and Wittgenstein's Legacy (Ashgate Wittgensteinian Studies). Edited by D.Z. Phillips and Mario von der Ruhr . Pp. X, 334, Aldershot, Ashgate, 2005, £55.00. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 54 (2):334-334.
  41. J. M. Cheeks & S. R. Briggs (1982). Self-Consciousness and Aspects of Personality. Journal of Research in Personality 16:401-8.
     
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  42.  9
    Keith Briggs & Peter Kin Po Tam (2010). Optimal Trip Planning in Transport Systems with Random Delays. Complexity 1200.
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  43.  3
    A. S. A. Briggs (2004). Build This House. The Chesterton Review 30 (3/4):413-414.
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  44.  8
    Lynn Froggett & Stephen Briggs (2012). Practice-Near and Practice-Distant Methods in Human Services Research. Journal of Research Practice 8 (2):Article - M9.
    This article discusses practice-near research in human services, a cluster of methodologies that may include thick description, intensive reflexivity, and the study of emotional and relational processes. Such methods aim to get as near as possible to experiences at the relational interface between institutions and the practice field. Psychoanalytically informed approaches to research are particularly fruitful here. In this article these are discussed in relation to the reflective practice and critical reflection traditions which have been widely discussed within social work, (...)
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  45.  1
    Gurmukh S. Johal, Scot H. Hulbert & Steven P. Briggs (1995). Disease Lesion Mimics of Maize: A Model for Cell Death in Plants. Bioessays 17 (8):685-692.
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  46.  4
    George E. Briggs & James M. Swanson (1970). Encoding, Decoding, and Central Functions in Human Information Processing. Journal of Experimental Psychology 86 (2):296.
  47.  6
    Richard S. Briggs (2012). Exploring the Origins of the Bible: Canon Formation in Historical, Literary, and Theological Perspective. (Acadia Studies in Bible and Theology) Edited by Craig A. Evans and Emanuel Tov . Pp. 272. Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2008, £12.99. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 53 (2):278-279.
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  48.  6
    Richard S. Briggs (2009). Seeing the Word: Refocusing New Testament Study (Studies in Theological Interpretation). By Markus Bockmuehl. Heythrop Journal 50 (1):143-144.
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  49.  6
    Jean L. Briggs (1991). Expecting the Unexpected: Canadian Inuit Training for an Experimental Lifestyle. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 19 (3):259-287.
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  50.  2
    Kate Briggs (2001). The Work of Sublimation Love: Utilising Absence. Analysis 10:10.
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