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  1. Bryan R. Warnick (2014). Taming the Conflict Over Educational Equality. Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (2).
    This article proposes an approach to educational distribution that attempts to minimise enduring tensions among conflicting values. At the foundation of this approach is a threshold of educational adequacy based on what is needed for citizens to participate in a democratic society. This threshold is justified because it minimises conflict with parental rights and because it better manages ‘the bottomless pit’ problem of educational distribution. This threshold is then modified to stipulate that, after the threshold has been reached, public resources (...)
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  2. Bryan R. Warnick & D. Spencer Smith (2014). The Controversy Over Controversies: A Plea for Flexibility and for “Soft‐Directive” Teaching. Educational Theory 64 (3):227-244.
    A controversy rages over the question of how should controversial topics be taught. Recent work has advanced the “epistemic criterion” as the resolution to this controversy. According to the epistemic criterion, a matter should be taught as controversial when contrary views can be entertained on the matter without the views being contrary to reason. When an issue is noncontroversial, according to the epistemic criterion, the correct position can be taught “directively,” with the teacher endorsing that position. When there is a (...)
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  3. Bryan R. Warnick (2012). Rethinking Education for Autonomy in Pluralistic Societies. Educational Theory 62 (4):411-426.
    If we are to posit, as do many liberal theorists, that autonomy is an educational goal that the state should endorse across cultural difference, key questions remain: What type of autonomy should we strive for, exactly, and how should this goal be achieved? Many liberal philosophers of education have argued that autonomy should enable cultural choice and that the development of autonomy requires students to be exposed to different beliefs and traditions. Shelley Burtt has challenged this dominant position, however, insisting (...)
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  4. Bryan R. Warnick (2012). Student Rights to Religious Expression and the Special Characteristics of Schools. Educational Theory 62 (1):59-74.
    In this essay Bryan Warnick explores how rights to religious expression should be understood for students in public schools. Warnick frames student religious rights as a debate between the conflicting values associated with the Free Exercise Clause and the values associated with the Establishment Clause of the United States Constitution. He then asks how the special characteristics of the school environment should guide us in prioritizing those values. The overall weight of the considerations, particularly concerns about civic education, leads to (...)
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  5. Bryan R. Warnick, Heather S. Dawson, D. Spencer Smith & Bethany Vosburg-Bluem (2010). Student Communities and Individualism in American Cinema. Educational Studies 46 (2):168-191.
    Hollywood films partially construct how Americans think about education. Recent work on the representation of schools in American cinema has highlighted the role of class difference in shaping school film genres. It has also advanced the idea that a nuanced understanding of American individualism helps to explain why the different class genres are shaped as they are. This article attempts to refine this theoretical approach by focusing on the paradox of individualism, which suggests that individualism must always be dependent on (...)
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  6. Bryan R. Warnick, Benjamin A. Johnson & Samuel Rocha (2010). Tragedy and the Meaning of School Shootings. Educational Theory 60 (3):371-390.
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  7. Bryan R. Warnick (2009). Ritual, Imitation and Education in R. S. Peters. Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (1):57-74.
    This article reconstructs R. S. Peters' underlying theory of ritual in education, highlighting his proposed link between ritual and the imitation of teachers. Rituals set the stage for the imitation of teachers and they invite students to experience practices whose value is not easily discernable from the outside. For Peters, rituals facilitate the transmission of values across time, create unity in schools, and affirm authority relations. There is a tension, however, between this view of ritual and imitation, on the one (...)
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  8. Bryan R. Warnick, Bradley Rowe & Sang Hyun Kim (2009). Student Rights, Clarence Thomas, and the Revolutionary Vision of Education. Educational Theory 59 (2):145-165.
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  9. Bryan R. Warnick (2007). Ethics and Education Forty Years Later. Educational Theory 57 (1):53-73.
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  10. Bryan R. Warnick (2006). Achilles and Hector: The Homeric Hero (Review). Journal of Aesthetic Education 40 (3):115-119.
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  11. Bryan R. Warnick (2004). Bringing Religious Traditions Into Educational Theory: Making an Example of Joseph Smith, Jr. Educational Theory 54 (4):345-364.
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  12. Bryan R. Warnick (2004). Cadaver Dissection and the Limits of Simulation. Journal of Clinical Ethics 15 (4):350.
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  13. Bryan R. Warnick (2004). Technological Metaphors and Moral Education: The Hacker Ethic and the Computational Experience. Studies in Philosophy and Education 23 (4):265-281.
    This essay is an attempt to understand how technological metaphors, particularly computer metaphors, are relevant to moral education. After discussing various types of technological metaphors, it is argued that technological metaphors enter moral thought through their functional descriptions. The computer metaphor is then explored by turning to the hacker ethic. Analysis of this ethic reveals parallels between the experience of computer programming and the moral standards of those who are enmeshed in computer technology. This parallel suggests that the hacker ethic (...)
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