Search results for 'Bryn Lewis' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Andrew Stranieri, John Zeleznikow, Mark Gawler & Bryn Lewis (1999). A Hybrid Rule – Neural Approach for the Automation of Legal Reasoning in the Discretionary Domain of Family Law in Australia. Artificial Intelligence and Law 7 (2-3):153-183.score: 80.0
    Few automated legal reasoning systems have been developed in domains of law in which a judicial decision maker has extensive discretion in the exercise of his or her powers. Discretionary domains challenge existing artificial intelligence paradigms because models of judicial reasoning are difficult, if not impossible to specify. We argue that judicial discretion adds to the characterisation of law as open textured in a way which has not been addressed by artificial intelligence and law researchers in depth. We demonstrate that (...)
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  2. David Lewis (1974). Spielman and Lewis on Inductive Immodesty. Philosophy of Science 41 (1):84-85.score: 40.0
  3. Paul Cartledge, W. M. Calder Iii, R. S. Smith, J. Vaio & George Cornewall Lewis (2003). Teaching the English Wissenschaft. The Letters of Sir George Cornewall Lewis to Karl Otfried MüllerTeaching the English Wissenschaft. The Letters of Sir George Cornewall Lewis to Karl Otfried Muller. Journal of Hellenic Studies 123:262.score: 40.0
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  4. D. M. Lewis (1973). Naphtali Lewis: Greek Historical Documents: The Fifth Century B.C. Pp. Xii+125. Toronto: Hakkert, 1971. Paper, $2.25. The Classical Review 23 (02):283-284.score: 40.0
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  5. C. S. Lewis (1991). Lewis Explains His Reasons for Distrusting the so-Called. The Chesterton Review 17 (3/4):541-542.score: 40.0
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  6. D. W. Hamlyn, Clarence Irving Lewis, John D. Goheen & John L. Mothershead (1972). Collected Papers of Clarence Irving Lewis. Philosophical Quarterly 22 (86):68.score: 40.0
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  7. Frank Jackson, Graham Priest & David Lewis (2004). How Many Lives Has Schrodinger's Cat? The Estate of David Kellogg Lewis. Thanks for Valuable Comments Are Due to David Albert, DM Armstrong, Phillip Bricker, Jeremy Butterfield, David Chalmers, John Collins, Adam Elga, Alan Hajek, Richard Hanley, Rae Langton, Peter Lewis, Stephanie Lewis, Barry Loewer, Jonathan Schaffer, Bas van Fraassen, Steven Weinstein, and Sam Wheeler. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (1):3-22.score: 40.0
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  8. C. S. Lewis (1991). Letter From Lewis to Mr and Mrs Sheldon Vanauken. The Chesterton Review 17 (3/4):538-539.score: 40.0
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  9. H. A. Lewis (1973). Modal Logic: The Lewis‐Modal Systems. Philosophical Books 14 (3):33-34.score: 40.0
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  10. Hywel David Lewis, Stewart R. Sutherland & T. A. Roberts (eds.) (1989). Religion, Reason, and the Self: Essays in Honour of Hywel D. Lewis. University of Wales Press.score: 40.0
     
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  11. Clarence Irving Lewis & Paul Arthur Schilpp (eds.) (1968). The Philosophy of C. I. Lewis. La Salle, Ill.,Open Court.score: 40.0
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  12. David Lewis (2000). Causation as Influence. Journal of Philosophy 97 (4):182-197.score: 30.0
  13. David Lewis (1981). Are We Free to Break the Laws? Theoria 47 (3):113-21.score: 30.0
    I insist that I was able to raise my hand, and I acknowledge that a law would have been broken had I done so, but I deny that I am therefore able to break a law. To uphold my instance of soft determinism, I need not claim any incredible powers. To uphold the compatibilism that I actually believe, I need not claim that such powers are even possible. My incompatibilist opponent is a creature of fiction, but he has his prototypes (...)
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  14. David Lewis (1969). Lucas Against Mechanism. Philosophy 44 (June):231-3.score: 30.0
  15. David Lewis (1979). Lucas Against Mechanism II. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 9 (June):373-6.score: 30.0
  16. Charles Siewert (1998). The Significance of Consciousness. Princeton University Press.score: 24.0
    "This is a marvelous book, full of subtle, thoughtful, and original argument.
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  17. Michael V. Antony (2008). Are Our Concepts Conscious State and Conscious Creature Vague? Erkenntnis 68 (2):239-263.score: 12.0
    Intuitively it has seemed to many that our concepts "conscious state" and "conscious creature" are sharp rather than vague, that they can have no borderline cases. On the other hand, many who take conscious states to be identical to, or realized by, complex physical states are committed to the vagueness of those concepts. In the paper I argue that "conscious state" and "conscious creature" are sharp by presenting four necessary conditions for conceiving borderline cases in general, and showing that some (...)
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  18. Rocco J. Gennaro, Consciousness. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 8.0
  19. Ted Honderich (1998). Consciousness as Existence. In Anthony O'Hear (ed.), Contemporary Issues in the Philosophy of Mind. Cambridge University Press. 94-109.score: 8.0
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  20. Maxine Sheets-Johnstone (1998). Consciousness: A Natural History. Journal of Consciousness Studies 5 (3):260-94.score: 8.0
  21. Gilbert Harman, What is Cognitive Access?score: 8.0
    Block is concerned with the question whether there are cases of phenomenology in the absence of cognitive access. I assume that, more precisely, the question is whether there are cases in which a subject S has a phenomenological experience E to which S does not have direct cognitive access? (S might have indirect cognitive access to E through scientific reasoning. I take it that’s not the sort of cognitive access in question.).
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  22. Peter Carruthers (2000). Phenomenal Consciousness: A Naturalistic Theory. Cambridge University Press.score: 8.0
    How can phenomenal consciousness exist as an integral part of a physical universe? How can the technicolour phenomenology of our inner lives be created out of the complex neural activities of our brains? Many have despaired of finding answers to these questions; and many have claimed that human consciousness is inherently mysterious. Peter Carruthers argues, on the contrary, that the subjective feel of our experience is fully explicable in naturalistic (scientifically acceptable) terms. Drawing on a variety of interdisciplinary resources, he (...)
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  23. Maarten Simons & Jan Masschelein (eds.) (2011). Rancière, Public Education and the Taming of Democracy. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 8.0
    Machine generated contents note: Notes on Contributors.1. Introduction: Hatred of Democracy... and of the Public Role of Education? (Maarten Simons and Jan Masschelein).2. The Public Role of Teaching: To Keep the Door Closed (Goele Cornelissen).3. Learner, Student, Speaker: Why It Matters How We Call Those We Teach (Gert Biesta).4. Ignorance and Translation, 'Artifacts' for Practices of Equality (Marc Derycke).5. Democratic Education: An (im)possibility That Yet Remains to Come (Daniel Friedrich, Bryn Jaastad and Thomas S. Popkewitz)6. Governmental, Political and Pedagogic (...)
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  24. D. H. Mellor (1993). Nothing Like Experience. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 63:1-16.score: 8.0
     
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  25. Jessica M. Wilson (forthcoming). Hume's Dictum and Metaphysical Modality: Lewis's Combinatorialism. In Barry Loewer & Jonathan Schaffer (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to David Lewis. Blackwell.score: 7.0
    Many contemporary philosophers accept Hume's Dictum (HD), according to which there are no metaphysically necessary connections between distinct, intrinsically typed entities. Tacit in Lewis's work is a potential motivation for HD, according to which one should accept HD as presupposed by the best account of the range of metaphysical possibilities---namely, a combinatorial account, applied to spatiotemporal fundamentalia. Here I elucidate and assess this Ludovician motivation for HD. After refining HD and surveying its key, recurrent role in Lewis’s work, (...)
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  26. Thomas Nagel (1986). The View From Nowhere. Oxford University Press.score: 6.0
    Human beings have the unique ability to view the world in a detached way: We can think about the world in terms that transcend our own experience or interest, and consider the world from a vantage point that is, in Nagel's words, "nowhere in particular". At the same time, each of us is a particular person in a particular place, each with his own "personal" view of the world, a view that we can recognize as just one aspect of the (...)
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  27. Phillip Bricker (2006). David Lewis: On the Plurality of Worlds. In John Shand (ed.), Central Works of Philosophy, Vol. 5: The Twentieth Century: Quine and After. Acumen Publishing.score: 6.0
    David Lewis's book 'On the Plurality of Worlds' mounts an extended defense of the thesis of modal realism, that the world we inhabit the entire cosmos of which we are a part is but one of a vast plurality of worlds, or cosmoi, all causally and spatiotemporally isolated from one another. The purpose of this article is to provide an accessible summary of the main positions and arguments in Lewis's book.
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  28. Junichi Murata (1997). Consciousness and the Mind-Body Problem. In M. Ito, Y. Miyashita & Edmund T. Rolls (eds.), Cognition, Computation, and Consciousness. Oxford University Press.score: 6.0
  29. Stevan Harnad (2000). Correlation Vs. Causality: How/Why the Mind-Body Problem is Hard. Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (4):54-61.score: 6.0
    The Mind/Body Problem (M/BP) is about causation not correlation. And its solution (if there is one) will require a mechanism in which the mental component somehow manages to play a causal role of its own, rather than just supervening superflously on other, nonmental components that look, for all the world, as if they can do the full causal job perfectly well without it. Correlations confirm that M does indeed "supervene" on B, but causality is needed to show how/why M is (...)
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  30. Austen Clark (2001). Phenomenal Consciousness so-Called. In Werner Backhaus (ed.), Neuronal Coding of Perceptual Systems. World Scientific.score: 6.0
    "Consciousness" is a multiply ambiguous word, and if our goal is to explain perceptual consciousness we had better be clear about which of the many senses of the word we are endorsing when we sign on to the project. I describe some of the relatively standard distinctions made in the philosophical literature about different meanings of the word "conscious". Then I consider some of the arguments of David Chalmers and of Ned Block that states of "phenomenal consciousness" pose special and (...)
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  31. Joseph A. Baltimore (2011). Lewis' Modal Realism and Absence Causation. Metaphysica 12 (2):117-124.score: 6.0
    A major criticism of David Lewis’ counterfactual theory of causation is that it allows too many things to count as causes, especially since Lewis allows, in addition to events, absences to be causes as well. Peter Menzies has advanced this concern under the title “the problem of profligate causation.” In this paper, I argue that the problem of profligate causation provides resources for exposing a tension between Lewis’ acceptance of absence causation and his modal realism. The result (...)
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  32. Robert Stalnaker (2004). Lewis on Intentionality. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (1):199 – 212.score: 6.0
    David Lewis's account of intentionality is a version of what he calls 'global descriptivism'. The rough idea is that the correct interpretation of one's total theory is the one (among the admissible interpretations) that come closest to making it true. I give an exposition of this account, as I understand it, and try to bring out some of its consequences. I argue that there is a tension between Lewis's global descriptivism and his rejection of a linguistic account of (...)
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  33. Karol Polcyn (2006). Phenomenal Consciousness and the Explanatory Gap. Diametros 6:49-69.score: 6.0
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  34. Dan López de Sa (2014). Lewis Vs Lewis on the Problem of the Many. Synthese 191 (6):1105-1117.score: 6.0
    Consider a cat on a mat. On the one hand, there seems to be just one cat, but on the other there seem to be many things with as good a claim as anything in the vicinity to being a cat. Hence, the problem of the many. In his ‘Many, but Almost One,’ David Lewis offered two solutions. According to the first, only one of the many is indeed a cat, although it is indeterminate exactly which one. According to (...)
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  35. Peter Menzies (1989). Probabilistic Causation and Causal Processes: A Critique of Lewis. Philosophy of Science 56 (4):642-663.score: 6.0
    This paper examines a promising probabilistic theory of singular causation developed by David Lewis. I argue that Lewis' theory must be made more sophisticated to deal with certain counterexamples involving pre-emption. These counterexamples appear to show that in the usual case singular causation requires an unbroken causal process to link cause with effect. I propose a new probabilistic account of singular causation, within the framework developed by Lewis, which captures this intuition.
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  36. Joshua Seachris & Linda Zagzebski (2007). Weighing Evils: The C. S. Lewis Approach. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 62 (2):81 - 88.score: 6.0
    It is often argued that the great quantity of evil in our world makes God’s existence less likely than a lesser quantity would, and this, presumably, because the probability that some evils are gratuitous increases as the overall quantity of evil increases. Often, an additive approach to quantifying evil is employed in such arguments. In this paper, we examine C. S. Lewis’ objection to the additive approach, arguing that although he is correct to reject this approach, there is a (...)
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  37. Alexander Bird (2008). The Epistemological Argument Against Lewis's Regularity View of Laws. Philosophical Studies 138 (1):73–89.score: 6.0
    I argue for the claim that if Lewis’s regularity theory of laws were true, we could not know any positive law statement to be true. Premise 1: According to that theory, for any law statement true of the actual world, there is always a nearby world where the law statement is false (a world that differs with respect to one matter of particular fact). Premise 2: One cannot know a proposition to be true if it is false in a (...)
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  38. Michael McGlone, Lewis on What Puzzling Pierre Does Not Believe.score: 6.0
    In “What Puzzling Pierre Does not Believe”, Lewis ([4], 412‐4) argues that the sentences (1) Pierre believes that London is pretty and (2) Pierre believes that London is not pretty both truly describe Kripke’s well‐known situation involving puzzling Pierre ([3]). Lewis also argues that this situation is not one according to which Pierre believes either the proposition (actually) expressed by (3) London is pretty or the proposition (actually) expressed by (4) London is not pretty. These claims, Lewis (...)
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  39. Barry Maguire (2013). Defending David Lewis's Modal Reduction. Philosophical Studies 166 (1):129-147.score: 6.0
    David Lewis claims that his theory of modality successfully reduces modal items to nonmodal items. This essay will clarify this claim and argue that it is true. This is largely an exercise within ‘Ludovician Polycosmology’: I hope to show that a certain intuitive resistance to the reduction and a set of related objections misunderstand the nature of the Ludovician project. But these results are of broad interest since they show that would-be reductionists have more formidable argumentative resources than is (...)
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  40. S. Oakley (2006). Defending Lewis's Local Miracle Compatibilism. Philosophical Studies 130 (2):337-349.score: 6.0
    Helen Beebee has recently argued that David Lewis’s account of compatibilism, so-called local miracle compatibilism (LMC), allows for the possibility that agents in deterministic worlds have the ability to break or cause the breaking of a law of nature. Because Lewis’s LMC allows for this consequence, Beebee claims that LMC is untenable and subsequently that Lewis’s criticism of van Inwagen’s Consequence Argument for incompatibilism is substantially weakened. I review Beebee’s argument against Lewis’s thesis and argue (...)
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  41. William S. Robinson (2004). Understanding Phenomenal Consciousness. Cambridge University Press.score: 6.0
    William S. Robinson has for many years written insightfully about the mind-body problem. In Understanding Phenomenal Consciousness he focuses on sensory experience (eg, pain, afterimages) and perception qualities such as colors, sounds and odors to present a dualistic view of the mind, called Qualitative Event Realism, that goes against the dominant materialist views. This theory is relevant to the development of a science of consciousness which is now being pursued not only by philosophers but by researchers in psychology and the (...)
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  42. Bruno Verbeek (2008). Conventions and Moral Norms: The Legacy of Lewis. Topoi 27 (1-2):73-86.score: 6.0
    David Lewis’ Convention has been a major source of inspiration for philosophers and social scientists alike for the analysis of norms. In this essay, I demonstrate its usefulness for the analysis of some moral norms. At the same time, conventionalism with regards to moral norms has attracted sustained criticism. I discuss three major strands of criticism and propose how these can be met. First, I discuss the criticism that Lewis conventions analyze norms in situations with no conflict of (...)
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  43. Thomas W. Polger & Robert A. Skipper, Naturalism, Explanation, and Identity.score: 6.0
    Some people believe that there is an “explanatory gap” between the facts of physics and certain other facts about the world—for example, facts about consciousness. The gap is presented as a challenge to any thoroughgoing naturalism or physicalism. We believe that advocates of the explanatory gap have some reasonable expectations that cannot be merely dismissed. We also believe that naturalistic thinkers have the resources to close the explanatory gap, but that they have not adequately explained how and why these resources (...)
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  44. Charles Pigden & Rebecca E. B. Entwisle (2012). Spread Worlds, Plenitude and Modal Realism: A Problem for David Lewis. In James Maclaurin (ed.), Rationis Defensor.score: 6.0
    In his metaphysical summa of 1986, The Plurality of Worlds, David Lewis famously defends a doctrine he calls ‘modal realism’, the idea that to account for the fact that some things are possible and some things are necessary we must postulate an infinity possible worlds, concrete entities like our own universe, but cut off from us in space and time. Possible worlds are required to account for the facts of modality without assuming that modality is primitive – that there (...)
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  45. David Woodruff Smith (2001). Three Facets of Consciousness. Axiomathes 12 (1-2):55-85.score: 6.0
    Over the past century phenomenology has ably analyzed the basic structuresof consciousness as we experience it. Yet recent philosophy of mind, lookingto brain activity and computational function, has found it difficult to makeroom for the structures of subjectivity and intentionality that phenomenologyhas appraised. In order to understand consciousness as something that is bothsubjective and grounded in neural activity, we need to delve into phenomenologyand ontology. I draw a fundamental distinction in ontology among the form,appearance, and substrate of any entity. Applying (...)
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  46. Adán Salinas Araya (1999). La imagen narrativa de Dios en C. S. Lewis, una lectura de “Las crónicas de Narnia”. Boletín de Filosofía (10):261-278.score: 6.0
    El artículo propone una interpretación de la obra literaria "Las Crónicas de Narnia" del autor ingles C. S Lewis. Tal interpretación posibilita considerar la alegoría religiosa que esta obra literaria realiza sobre la experiencia de la divinidad a través de la figura del León.
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  47. Carla Merino-Rajme (forthcoming). Why Lewis' Appeal to Natural Properties Fails to Kripke's Rule-Following Paradox. Philosophical Studies:1-13.score: 6.0
    I consider Lewis’ appeal to naturalness to solve Kripke’s rule-following paradox. I then present a different interpretation of this paradox and offer reasons for thinking that this is what Kripke had in mind. I argue that Lewis’ proposal cannot provide a solution to this version of paradox.
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  48. Charles Pigden (2007). Desiring to Desire: Russell, Lewis and G.E.Moore. In Susana Nuccetelli & Gary Seay (eds.), Themes from G.E.Moore. Oxford University Press. 244-260.score: 6.0
    I have two aims in this paper. In §§2-4 I contend that Moore has two arguments (not one) for the view that that ‘good’ denotes a non-natural property not to be identified with the naturalistic properties of science and common sense (or, for that matter, the more exotic properties posited by metaphysicians and theologians). The first argument, the Barren Tautology Argument (or the BTA), is derived, via Sidgwick, from a long tradition of anti-naturalist polemic. But the second argument, the Open (...)
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  49. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (2002). Lewis' Strawman. Philosophical Quarterly 52 (206):55-65.score: 6.0
    In a survey of his views in the philosophy of mind, David Lewis criticizes much recent work in the field by attacking an imaginary opponent, Strawman. His case against Strawman focuses on four central theses which Lewis takes to be widely accepted among contemporary philosophers of mind. These theses concerns (1) the language of thought hypothesis and its relation to folk psychology, (2) narrow content, (3) de se content, and (4) rationality. We respond to Lewis, arguing (among (...)
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  50. Robert Kirk (1992). Consciousness and Concepts. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 66 (66):23-40.score: 6.0
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