Search results for 'Buddhism Psychology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. W. F. Jayasuriya (1963). The Psychology and Philosophy of Buddhism. Colombo, Y. M. B. A. Press.
     
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  2.  11
    Jay L. Garfield, Shaun Nichols, Arun K. Rai & Nina Strohminger (2015). Ego, Egoism and the Impact of Religion on Ethical Experience: What a Paradoxical Consequence of Buddhist Culture Tells Us About Moral Psychology. Journal of Ethics 19 (3-4):293-304.
    We discuss the structure of Buddhist theory, showing that it is a kind of moral phenomenology directed to the elimination of egoism through the elimination of a sense of self. We then ask whether being raised in a Buddhist culture in which the values of selflessness and the sense of non-self are so deeply embedded transforms one’s sense of who one is, one’s ethical attitudes and one’s attitude towards death, and in particular whether those transformations are consistent with the predictions (...)
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  3.  13
    Padmasiri De Silva (1992). Buddhist and Freudian Psychology. Singapore University Press, National University of Singapore.
    The work presents in clear focus, comparative perspectives on the nature of Man, Mind, Motivation, Conflict, Anxiety and Suffering, as well as the therapeutic ...
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  4.  2
    Daniel Capper (2014). The Trees, My Lungs: Self Psychology and the Natural World at an American Buddhist Center. Zygon 49 (3):554-571.
    This study employs ethnographic field data to trace a dialogue between the self-psychological concept of the self object and experiences regarding the concept of “interbeing” at a Vietnamese Buddhist monastery in the United States. The dialogue develops an understanding of human experiences with the nonhuman natural world which are tensive, liminal, and nondual. From the dialogue I find that the self object concept, when applied to this form of Buddhism, must be inclusive enough to embrace relationships with animals, stones, (...)
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  5. G. T. Jinpa (2000). The Foundations of a Buddhist Psychology of Awakening. In Gay Watson, Stephen Batchelor & Guy Claxton (eds.), The Psychology of Awakening: Buddhism, Science, and Our Day-to-Day Lives. Samuel Weiser 10--22.
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  6. Caroline A. F. Rhys Davids (1936). The Birth of Indian Psychology and its Development in Buddhism. London, Luzac & Co..
     
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  7.  8
    Jack Engler (1998). Buddhist Psychology: Contributions to Western Psychological Theory. In Anthony Molino (ed.), The Couch and the Tree: Dialogues in Psychoanalysis and Buddhism. North Point Press 111--118.
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  8.  20
    Lynken Ghose (2004). A Study in Buddhist Psychology: Is Buddhism Truly Pro‐Detachment and Anti‐Attachment? Contemporary Buddhism 5 (2):105-120.
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  9. David J. Kalupahana (2008). The Foundations of Early Buddhist Psychology. In K. Ramakrishna Rao (ed.), Handbook of Indian Psychology. Cambridge University Press 73.
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  10. G. R. S. Mead (1916). Buddhist Psychology: An Inquiry Into the Analysis and Theory of Mind in Pāli Literature. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 13 (3):78-81.
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  11.  37
    Tse-fu Kuan (2012). Cognitive Operations in Buddhist Meditation: Interface with Western Psychology. Contemporary Buddhism 13 (1):35-60.
    This paper interprets Buddhist meditation from perspectives of Western psychology and explores the common grounds shared by the two disciplines. Cognitive operations in Buddhist meditation are mainly characterized by mindfulness and concentration in relation to attention. Mindfulness in particular plays a pivotal role in regulating attention. My study based on Buddhist literature corroborates significant correspondence between mindfulness and metacognition as propounded by some psychologists. In vipassan? meditation, mindfulness regulates attention in such a way that attention is directed to monitor (...)
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  12.  10
    Padmasiri De Silva, An Introduction to Buddhist Psychology and Counselling: Pathways of Mindfulness-Based Therapies.
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  13.  78
    William Mikulas (2007). Buddhism & Western Psychology: Fundamentals of Integration. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (4):4-49.
    Essential Buddhism, the fundamental teachings of the historical Buddha and the core of all major branches of Buddhism, is psychology, not religion or philosophy. Essential Buddhism is described from a psychological perspective and interrelated with Western psychology in general, and cognitive science, behaviour modification, psychoanalysis, and transpersonal psychology, in specific. Integrating Buddhist psychology and Western psychology yields a more comprehensive psychology and more powerful therapies.
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  14. David Ross Komito (1990). Nāgārjuna's "Seventy Stanzas": A Buddhist Psychology of Emptiness. Philosophy East and West 40 (2):256-258.
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  15.  4
    Henry M. Vyner (2002). The Descriptive Mind Science of Tibetan Buddhist Psychology and the Nature of the Healthy Human Mind. Anthropology of Consciousness 13 (2):1-25.
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  16.  3
    Frank J. Hoffman (1988). David J. Kalupahana. Nagarjuna: The Philosophy of the Middle Way. Pp. 412. SUNY Series in Buddhist Studies. $16.95 ; $49.50 .David J. Kalupahana. The Principles of Buddhist Psychology. Pp. 236. SUNY Series in Buddhist Studies. $12.95 ; $39.50. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 24 (4):529.
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  17.  1
    Jeremy P. Hunter (2002). Being Arising: Buddhist Psychology Books. Anthropology of Consciousness 13 (2):61-63.
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  18. Edward P. Buffet (1916). Hys Davids's Buddhist Psychology. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 13 (3):78.
     
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  19. M. G. T. Kwee, K. J. Gergen & F. Koshikawa (eds.) (forthcoming). Buddhist Psychology: Practice, Research & Theory. Taos Institute Publishing, Taos, New Mexico.
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  20.  5
    Eleanor Rosch (2002). How to Catch James's Mystic Germ Religious Experience, Buddhist Meditation and Psychology. Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (9-10):9-10.
    Within The Varieties of Religious Experience lies the germ of a truly radical idea. It is that religious experience has something important and basic to contribute to the science of psychology. Yet now, a hundred years after the publication of James's monumental work, the mainstream academic fields of psychology are no closer to considering, let alone implementing, this idea than they were in James's day. Why? Surely one aspect of this is the way in which the categories and (...)
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  21. Mangala R. Chinchore (1996). Santāna and Santānāntara: An Analysis of the Buddhist Perspective Concerning Continuity, Transformation, and Transcedence and the Basis of an Alternative Philosophy Psychology. Sri Satguru Publications.
     
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  22.  6
    Amos Yong (2005). Christian and Buddhist Perspectives on Neuro Psychology and the Human Person: Pneuma and Pratityasamutpada. Zygon 40 (1):143-165.
    . Recent discussions of the mind‐brain and the soul‐body problems have been both advanced and complexified by the cognitive sciences. I focus explicitly here on emergence, supervenience, and nonreductive physicalist theories of human personhood in light of recent advances in the Christian‐Buddhist dialogue. While traditional self and no‐self views pitted Christianity versus Buddhism versus science, I show how the nonreductive physicalist proposal regarding human personhood emerging from the neuroscientific enterprise both contributes to and is enriched by the Christian concept (...)
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  23.  4
    Benjamin J. Chicka (2010). Contexts and Dialogue: Yogācāra Buddhism and Modern Psychology on the Subliminal Mind, And: Sciousness (Review). Buddhist-Christian Studies 30 (1):201-205.
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  24.  8
    Yozan Dirk Mosig (2006). Conceptions of the Self in Western and Eastern Psychology. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 26 (1-2):39-50.
    The concept of the self in Western psychology derives primarily from the work of Freud, Jung, and Rogers. To some extent Western formulations of the self evidence a homunculus-like quality lacking in some Eastern conceptions, especially those derived from the Vijnanavada and Zen Buddhist traditions. The Buddhist notion of self circumvents reification, being an impermanent gestalt formed by the interaction of five skandhas or aggregates . Each skandha is in turn a transient pattern formed by the interaction of the (...)
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  25.  34
    Peter D. Hershock (2008). Contexts and Dialogue: Yogācāra Buddhism and Modern Psychology on the Subliminal Mind – by Tao Jiang. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (2):371–375.
  26.  14
    Steve Odin (1982). Alchemical Imagination and Psychic Transformation in Jungian Depth Psychology and the Buddhist Tantras. International Philosophical Quarterly 22 (4):255-274.
  27.  2
    K. Loewenthal (1976). Tulku Tarthang . Reflections of Mind: Western Psychology Meets Tibetan Buddhism. Pp. Xii + 198. $3.95. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 12 (2):251.
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  28.  2
    Padmasiri De Silva, A Study of Motivational Theory in Early Buddhism with Reference to the Psychology of Freud.
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  29. G. Claxton (1999). John Picketing (Ed.), The Authority of Experience: Essays on Buddhism and Psychology. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6:144-145.
     
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  30. Rhys Davids (1940). Robert H. Thouless, M. A., Ph.D., Conventionalisation and Assimilation in Religious Movements as Problems in Social Psychology-with Special Reference to the Development of Buddhism and Christianity. [REVIEW] Hibbert Journal 39:444.
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  31. Nathan Katz (1986). Buddhist and Western Psychology. Philosophy East and West 36 (4):431-434.
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  32.  3
    Sangharakshita (1998). Know Your Mind: The Psychological Dimension of Ethics in Buddhism. Windhorse.
    Know Your Mind is an accessible introduction to traditional Buddhist psychology, offering a clear description of the nature of mind and how it functions.
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  33. Gay Watson, Stephen Batchelor & Guy Claxton (eds.) (2000). The Psychology of Awakening: Buddhism, Science, and Our Day-to-Day Lives. Samuel Weiser.
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  34.  38
    Owen J. Flanagan (2011). The Bodhisattva's Brain: Buddhism Naturalized. MIT Press.
    An Essay in Comparative Neurophilosophy -- Preface -- Introduction: Buddhism Naturalized -- The Bodhisattva's Brain -- The Colour of Happiness -- Buddhist Epistemology and Science -- Buddhism as a Natural Philosophy. Buddhist Persons -- Being No-self & Being Nice -- Virtue & Happiness -- Postscript: Cosmopolitanism and Comparative Philosophy.
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  35.  36
    Maria Heim (2011). Buddhist Ethics: A Review Essay. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (3):571-584.
    I argue that three recent studies (Imagining the Life Course, by Nancy Eberhardt; Sensory Biographies, by Robert Desjarlais; and How to Behave, by Anne Hansen) advance the field of Buddhist Ethics in the direction of the empirical study of morality. I situate their work within a larger context of moral anthropology, that is, the study of human nature in its limits and capacities for moral agency. Each of these books offers a finely grained account of particular and local Buddhist ways (...)
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  36.  56
    Noa Ronkin (2005). Early Buddhist Metaphysics: The Making of a Philosophical Tradition. London ; New Yorkroutledgecurzon.
    Early Buddhist Metaphysics provides a philosophical account of the major doctrinal shift in the history of early Theravada tradition in India: the transition from the earliest stratum of Buddhist thought to the systematic and allegedly scholastic philosophy of the Pali Abhidhamma movement. Entwining comparative philosophy and Buddhology, the author probes the Abhidhamma's metaphysical transition in terms of the Aristotelian tradition and vis-à-vis modern philosophy, exploits Western philosophical literature from Plato to contemporary texts in the fields of philosophy (...)
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  37.  50
    B. Alan Wallace (2006). Buddhism and Science. In Philip Clayton (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. OUP Oxford 24-40.
    Accession Number: ATLA0001712103; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 24-40.; Language(s): English; General Note: Bibliography: p 38-40.; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
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  38. C. L. A. De Silva (1937/1988). A Treatise on Buddhist Philosophy, or, Abhidhamma. Sri Satguru Publications.
     
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  39. Erich Fromm (1960/1986). Psychoanalysis and Zen Buddhism. Unwin Paperbacks.
  40. Anagarika Brahmacari Govinda (1974). The Psychological Attitude of Early Buddhist Philosophy and its Systematic Representation According to Abhidhamma Tradition. S. Weiser.
     
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  41. Aruna Haldar (1981). Some Psychological Aspects of Early Buddhist Philosophy Based on Abhidharmakośa of Vasubandhu. Asiatic Society.
     
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  42. Anthony Molino (ed.) (1998). The Couch and the Tree: Dialogues in Psychoanalysis and Buddhism. North Point Press.
  43.  3
    Thubten Yeshe (2004/2010). The Peaceful Stillness of the Silent Mind: Buddhism, Mind and Meditation. Lama Yeshe Wisdom Archive.
    The six teachings contained herein come from Lama Yeshe'¿¿s 1975 visit to Australia.Lama Yeshe on Mind:"At certain times, a silent mind is very important, but ...
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  44.  15
    Christian Coseru (2014). Buddhism, Comparative Neurophilosophy, and Human Flourishing. Zygon 49 (1):208-219.
    Owen Flanagan's The Bodhisattva's Brain represents an ambitious foray into cross-cultural neurophilosophy, making a compelling, though not entirely unproblematic, case for naturalizing Buddhist philosophy. While the naturalist account of mental causation challenges certain Buddhist views about the mind, the Buddhist analysis of mind and mental phenomena is far more complex than the book suggests. Flanagan is right to criticize the Buddhist claim that there could be mental states that are not reducible to their neural correlates; however, when the mental states (...)
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  45. Mark Siderits (2003). Personal Identity and Buddhist Philosophy: Empty Persons. Ashgate.
    This book initiates a conversation between the two traditions showing how concepts and tools drawn from one philosophical tradition can help solve problems ...
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  46. James Giles (1993). The No-Self Theory: Hume, Buddhism, and Personal Identity. Philosophy East and West 43 (2):175-200.
    The problem of personal identity is often said to be one of accounting for what it is that gives persons their identity over time. However, once the problem has been construed in these terms, it is plain that too much has already been assumed. For what has been assumed is just that persons do have an identity. A new interpretation of Hume's no-self theory is put forward by arguing for an eliminative rather than a reductive view of personal identity, and (...)
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  47.  31
    Nalini Bhushan (2008). Toward an Anatomy of Mourning: Discipline, Devotion and Liberation in a Freudian-Buddhist Framework. Sophia 47 (1):57-69.
    In this essay I first articulate what I take to be an influential and for the most part persuasive model in the western psychoanalytic tradition that is a response to tragic loss, namely, the one that we find in Freud’s little essay entitled ‘Mourning and Melancholia’ (1917). I then use a well-known Buddhist folk tale about the plight of a young woman named Kisagotami to underscore central elements from Buddhist psychology on the subject of suffering that is a consequence (...)
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  48.  69
    Daniel Goleman (ed.) (2003). Healing Emotions: Conversations with the Dalai Lama on Mindfulness, Emotions, and Health. Shambhala.
    Can the mind heal the body? The Buddhist tradition says yes--and now many Western scientists are beginning to agree. Healing Emotions is the record of an extraordinary series of encounters between the Dalai Lama and prominent Western psychologists, physicians, and meditation teachers that sheds new light on the mind-body connection. Topics include: compassion as medicine; the nature of consciousness; self-esteem; and the meeting points of mind, body, and spirit. This edition contains a new foreword by the editor.
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  49.  13
    Joseph Loizzo (2011). Personal Agency Across Generations: Evolutionary Psychology or Religious Belief? Sophia 50 (3):429-452.
    Although the authors of modern scientific psychology agreed on precious little, Freud and Jung both insisted that any complete science of psychology requires some way to explain the intergenerational inheritance of character traits or personal habits of mind and action. Yet neither they nor their heirs in contemporary philosophy, psychology or cognitive science have been able to provide a plausible conceptual framework, much less a mechanism to account for the conservation of forms of personal agency across multiple (...)
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    Patricia Sharp (2011). Buddhist Enlightenment and the Destruction of Attractor Networks: A Neuroscientific Speculation on the Buddhist Path From Everyday Consciousness to Buddha-Awakening. Journal of Consciousness Studies 18 (3-4):3-4.
    Buddhist philosophy asserts that human suffering is caused by ignorance regarding the true nature of reality. According to this, perceptions and thoughts are largely fabrications of our own minds, based on conditioned tendencies which often involve problematic fears, aversions, compulsions, etc. In Buddhist psychology, these tendencies reside in a portion of mind known as Store consciousness. Here, I suggest a correspondence between this Buddhist Store consciousness and the neuroscientific idea of stored synaptic weights. These weights are strong synaptic connections (...)
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