Search results for 'Buddhism Psychology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Padmasiri De Silva (1992). Buddhist and Freudian Psychology. Singapore University Press, National University of Singapore.score: 180.0
    The work presents in clear focus, comparative perspectives on the nature of Man, Mind, Motivation, Conflict, Anxiety and Suffering, as well as the therapeutic ...
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  2. Daniel Capper (2014). The Trees, My Lungs: Self Psychology and the Natural World at an American Buddhist Center. Zygon 49 (3):554-571.score: 180.0
    This study employs ethnographic field data to trace a dialogue between the self-psychological concept of the self object and experiences regarding the concept of “interbeing” at a Vietnamese Buddhist monastery in the United States. The dialogue develops an understanding of human experiences with the nonhuman natural world which are tensive, liminal, and nondual. From the dialogue I find that the self object concept, when applied to this form of Buddhism, must be inclusive enough to embrace relationships with animals, stones, (...)
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  3. W. F. Jayasuriya (1963). The Psychology and Philosophy of Buddhism. Colombo, Y. M. B. A. Press.score: 180.0
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  4. G. T. Jinpa (2000). The Foundations of a Buddhist Psychology of Awakening. In Gay Watson, Stephen Batchelor & Guy Claxton (eds.), The Psychology of Awakening: Buddhism, Science, and Our Day-to-Day Lives. Samuel Weiser. 10--22.score: 174.0
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  5. Caroline A. F. Rhys Davids (1936). The Birth of Indian Psychology and its Development in Buddhism. London, Luzac & Co..score: 168.0
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  6. Lynken Ghose (2004). A Study in Buddhist Psychology: Is Buddhism Truly Pro‐Detachment and Anti‐Attachment? Contemporary Buddhism 5 (2):105-120.score: 156.0
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  7. Jack Engler (1998). Buddhist Psychology: Contributions to Western Psychological Theory. In Anthony Molino (ed.), The Couch and the Tree: Dialogues in Psychoanalysis and Buddhism. North Point Press. 111--118.score: 156.0
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  8. David J. Kalupahana (2008). The Foundations of Early Buddhist Psychology. In K. Ramakrishna Rao (ed.), Handbook of Indian Psychology. Cambridge University Press. 73.score: 156.0
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  9. William Mikulas (2007). Buddhism & Western Psychology: Fundamentals of Integration. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (4):4-49.score: 150.0
    Essential Buddhism, the fundamental teachings of the historical Buddha and the core of all major branches of Buddhism, is psychology, not religion or philosophy. Essential Buddhism is described from a psychological perspective and interrelated with Western psychology in general, and cognitive science, behaviour modification, psychoanalysis, and transpersonal psychology, in specific. Integrating Buddhist psychology and Western psychology yields a more comprehensive psychology and more powerful therapies.
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  10. Tse-fu Kuan (2012). Cognitive Operations in Buddhist Meditation: Interface with Western Psychology. Contemporary Buddhism 13 (1):35-60.score: 150.0
    This paper interprets Buddhist meditation from perspectives of Western psychology and explores the common grounds shared by the two disciplines. Cognitive operations in Buddhist meditation are mainly characterized by mindfulness and concentration in relation to attention. Mindfulness in particular plays a pivotal role in regulating attention. My study based on Buddhist literature corroborates significant correspondence between mindfulness and metacognition as propounded by some psychologists. In vipassan? meditation, mindfulness regulates attention in such a way that attention is directed to monitor (...)
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  11. Frank J. Hoffman (1988). David J. Kalupahana. Nagarjuna: The Philosophy of the Middle Way. Pp. 412. (New York: State University of New York Press, 1986.) SUNY Series in Buddhist Studies. $16.95 (Paper); $49.50 (Cloth).David J. Kalupahana. The Principles of Buddhist Psychology. Pp. 236.(New York: State University of New York Press, 1987.) SUNY Series in Buddhist Studies. $12.95 (Paper); $39.50 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Religious Studies 24 (4):529.score: 150.0
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  12. Jeremy P. Hunter (2002). Being Arising: Buddhist Psychology Books. Anthropology of Consciousness 13 (2):61-63.score: 150.0
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  13. M. G. T. Kwee, K. J. Gergen & F. Koshikawa (eds.) (forthcoming). Buddhist Psychology: Practice, Research & Theory. Taos Institute Publishing, Taos, New Mexico.score: 150.0
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  14. Sangharakshita (1998). Know Your Mind: The Psychological Dimension of Ethics in Buddhism. Windhorse.score: 150.0
    Know Your Mind is an accessible introduction to traditional Buddhist psychology, offering a clear description of the nature of mind and how it functions.
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  15. Henry M. Vyner (2002). The Descriptive Mind Science of Tibetan Buddhist Psychology and the Nature of the Healthy Human Mind. Anthropology of Consciousness 13 (2):1-25.score: 150.0
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  16. Mangala R. Chinchore (1996). Santāna and Santānāntara: An Analysis of the Buddhist Perspective Concerning Continuity, Transformation, and Transcedence and the Basis of an Alternative Philosophy Psychology. Sri Satguru Publications.score: 132.0
     
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  17. Benjamin J. Chicka (2010). Contexts and Dialogue: Yogācāra Buddhism and Modern Psychology on the Subliminal Mind, And: Sciousness (Review). Buddhist-Christian Studies 30 (1):201-205.score: 126.0
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  18. Peter D. Hershock (2008). Contexts and Dialogue: Yogācāra Buddhism and Modern Psychology on the Subliminal Mind – by Tao Jiang. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (2):371–375.score: 120.0
  19. Steve Odin (1982). Alchemical Imagination and Psychic Transformation in Jungian Depth Psychology and the Buddhist Tantras. International Philosophical Quarterly 22 (4):255-274.score: 120.0
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  20. Amos Yong (2005). Christian and Buddhist Perspectives on Neuro Psychology and the Human Person: Pneuma and Pratityasamutpada. Zygon 40 (1):143-165.score: 120.0
  21. Eleanor Rosch (2002). How to Catch James's Mystic Germ Religious Experience, Buddhist Meditation and Psychology. Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (9-10):9-10.score: 120.0
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  22. G. Claxton (1999). John Picketing (Ed.), The Authority of Experience: Essays on Buddhism and Psychology. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6:144-145.score: 120.0
     
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  23. Anagarika Brahmacari Govinda (1974). The Psychological Attitude of Early Buddhist Philosophy and its Systematic Representation According to Abhidhamma Tradition. S. Weiser.score: 120.0
     
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  24. Aruna Haldar (1981). Some Psychological Aspects of Early Buddhist Philosophy Based on Abhidharmakośa of Vasubandhu. Asiatic Society.score: 120.0
     
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  25. K. Loewenthal (1976). Tulku Tarthang (Editor). Reflections of Mind: Western Psychology Meets Tibetan Buddhism. Pp. Xii + 198. (California: Dharma Publishing, 1975.) $3.95. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 12 (2):251.score: 120.0
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  26. Gay Watson, Stephen Batchelor & Guy Claxton (eds.) (2000). The Psychology of Awakening: Buddhism, Science, and Our Day-to-Day Lives. Samuel Weiser.score: 120.0
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  27. Maria Heim (2011). Buddhist Ethics: A Review Essay. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (3):571-584.score: 102.0
    I argue that three recent studies (Imagining the Life Course, by Nancy Eberhardt; Sensory Biographies, by Robert Desjarlais; and How to Behave, by Anne Hansen) advance the field of Buddhist Ethics in the direction of the empirical study of morality. I situate their work within a larger context of moral anthropology, that is, the study of human nature in its limits and capacities for moral agency. Each of these books offers a finely grained account of particular and local Buddhist ways (...)
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  28. Noa Ronkin (2005). Early Buddhist Metaphysics: The Making of a Philosophical Tradition. London ; New Yorkroutledgecurzon.score: 96.0
    Early Buddhist Metaphysics provides a philosophical account of the major doctrinal shift in the history of early Theravada tradition in India: the transition from the earliest stratum of Buddhist thought to the systematic and allegedly scholastic philosophy of the Pali Abhidhamma movement. Entwining comparative philosophy and Buddhology, the author probes the Abhidhamma's metaphysical transition in terms of the Aristotelian tradition and vis-à-vis modern philosophy, exploits Western philosophical literature from Plato to contemporary texts in the fields of philosophy of mind and (...)
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  29. Owen J. Flanagan (2011). The Bodhisattva's Brain: Buddhism Naturalized. Mit Press.score: 96.0
    An Essay in Comparative Neurophilosophy -- Preface -- Introduction: Buddhism Naturalized -- The Bodhisattva's Brain -- The Colour of Happiness -- Buddhist Epistemology and Science -- Buddhism as a Natural Philosophy. Buddhist Persons -- Being No-self & Being Nice -- Virtue & Happiness -- Postscript: Cosmopolitanism and Comparative Philosophy.
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  30. Yozan Dirk Mosig (2006). Conceptions of the Self in Western and Eastern Psychology. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 26 (1-2):39-50.score: 96.0
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  31. B. Alan Wallace (2006). Buddhism and Science. In Philip Clayton (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. Oup Oxford. 24-40.score: 90.0
    Accession Number: ATLA0001712103; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 24-40.; Language(s): English; General Note: Bibliography: p 38-40.; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
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  32. C. L. A. De Silva (1937/1988). A Treatise on Buddhist Philosophy, or, Abhidhamma. Sri Satguru Publications.score: 90.0
     
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  33. Erich Fromm (1960/1986). Psychoanalysis and Zen Buddhism. Unwin Paperbacks.score: 90.0
  34. Anthony Molino (ed.) (1998). The Couch and the Tree: Dialogues in Psychoanalysis and Buddhism. North Point Press.score: 90.0
  35. Thubten Yeshe (2004/2010). The Peaceful Stillness of the Silent Mind: Buddhism, Mind and Meditation. Lama Yeshe Wisdom Archive.score: 90.0
    The six teachings contained herein come from Lama Yeshe'¿¿s 1975 visit to Australia.Lama Yeshe on Mind:"At certain times, a silent mind is very important, but ...
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  36. Christian Coseru (2014). Buddhism, Comparative Neurophilosophy, and Human Flourishing. Zygon 49 (1):208-219.score: 84.0
    Owen Flanagan's The Bodhisattva's Brain represents an ambitious foray into cross-cultural neurophilosophy, making a compelling, though not entirely unproblematic, case for naturalizing Buddhist philosophy. While the naturalist account of mental causation challenges certain Buddhist views about the mind, the Buddhist analysis of mind and mental phenomena is far more complex than the book suggests. Flanagan is right to criticize the Buddhist claim that there could be mental states that are not reducible to their neural correlates; however, when the mental states (...)
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  37. Mark Siderits (2003). Personal Identity and Buddhist Philosophy: Empty Persons. Ashgate.score: 78.0
    This book initiates a conversation between the two traditions showing how concepts and tools drawn from one philosophical tradition can help solve problems ...
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  38. James Giles (1993). The No-Self Theory: Hume, Buddhism, and Personal Identity. Philosophy East and West 43 (2):175-200.score: 72.0
    The problem of personal identity is often said to be one of accounting for what it is that gives persons their identity over time. However, once the problem has been construed in these terms, it is plain that too much has already been assumed. For what has been assumed is just that persons do have an identity. A new interpretation of Hume's no-self theory is put forward by arguing for an eliminative rather than a reductive view of personal identity, and (...)
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  39. Nalini Bhushan (2008). Toward an Anatomy of Mourning: Discipline, Devotion and Liberation in a Freudian-Buddhist Framework. Sophia 47 (1):57-69.score: 72.0
    In this essay I first articulate what I take to be an influential and for the most part persuasive model in the western psychoanalytic tradition that is a response to tragic loss, namely, the one that we find in Freud’s little essay entitled ‘Mourning and Melancholia’ (1917). I then use a well-known Buddhist folk tale about the plight of a young woman named Kisagotami to underscore central elements from Buddhist psychology on the subject of suffering that is a consequence (...)
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  40. Daniel Goleman (ed.) (2003). Healing Emotions: Conversations with the Dalai Lama on Mindfulness, Emotions, and Health. Shambhala.score: 66.0
    Can the mind heal the body? The Buddhist tradition says yes--and now many Western scientists are beginning to agree. Healing Emotions is the record of an extraordinary series of encounters between the Dalai Lama and prominent Western psychologists, physicians, and meditation teachers that sheds new light on the mind-body connection. Topics include: compassion as medicine; the nature of consciousness; self-esteem; and the meeting points of mind, body, and spirit. This edition contains a new foreword by the editor.
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  41. Joseph Loizzo (2011). Personal Agency Across Generations: Evolutionary Psychology or Religious Belief? Sophia 50 (3):429-452.score: 66.0
    Although the authors of modern scientific psychology agreed on precious little, Freud and Jung both insisted that any complete science of psychology requires some way to explain the intergenerational inheritance of character traits or personal habits of mind and action. Yet neither they nor their heirs in contemporary philosophy, psychology or cognitive science have been able to provide a plausible conceptual framework, much less a mechanism to account for the conservation of forms of personal agency across multiple (...)
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  42. Herbert V. Guenther (1992). Meditation Differently, Phenomenological-Psychological Aspects of Tibetan Buddhist (Mahāmudrā and Snying-Thig) Practices From Original Tibetan Sources. Motilal Banarsidass Publishers.score: 62.0
    Concept of meditation in Tibetan Buddhism. - Includes bibliographical references (p. [193]-198). - Includes indexes.
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  43. Hubert Benoît (2004). The Light of Zen in the West: Incorporating the Supreme Doctrine and the Realization of the Self. Sussex Academic Press.score: 60.0
    Following the success of the publication of "The Supreme Doctrine" in 1998, Sussex Academic is proud to announce a completely new and updated translation by ...
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  44. Jay L. Garfield, Ask Not What Buddhism Can Do.score: 60.0
    Enthusiasts for the scientific character of Buddhism wax eloquent regarding the insights that the Buddhist tradition can deliver to cognitive science, and the contributions that meditative technique can make to understanding cognitive and affective processes. To be sure, there are contributions in this direction, though their significance may be overestimated. Less attention is paid to the value of cognitive theory for developing Buddhist insights in the 21 st Century, and the role of science in the dissemination of Buddhism (...)
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  45. Pinit Ratanakul (1988). Bioethics in Thailand: The Struggle for Buddhist Solutions. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 13 (3):301-312.score: 60.0
    The Thai concern for bioethics has been stimulated by the departure of Thai medicine from its long tradition through the introduction of Western medical models. Bioethics is now being taught to Thai medical students emphasizing moral insights and principles found within Thai culture. These are to a large extent Buddhist themes. Veracity is always a duty for people in general and medical personnel in particular. Falsehoods and deception cannot be morally justified simply on the grounds that we think it is (...)
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  46. Grāmaṇī Abhaya (2008). "Pera Noăsū Dharmayeki" Pubbe Annussutesu Dhammesu Cintanayen Ehā. Ăs. Goḍagē Saha Sahōdarayō.score: 60.0
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  47. Brahmadevanārāyaṇa Śarma (2007). Bauddhamanovijñāna. Sampūrṇānanda Saṃskr̥ta Viśvavidyālaya.score: 60.0
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  48. Jared R. Lindahl, Christopher T. Kaplan, Evan M. Winget & Willoughby B. Britton (2013). A Phenomenology of Meditation-Induced Light Experiences: Traditional Buddhist and Neurobiological Perspectives. Frontiers in Psychology 4:973.score: 60.0
    The scientific study of Buddhist meditation has proceeded without much attention to Buddhist literature that details the range of psychological and physiological changes thought to occur during meditation. This paper presents reports of various meditation-induced light experiences derived from American Buddhist practitioners. The reports of light experiences are classified into two main types: discrete lightforms and patterned or diffuse lights. Similar phenomena are well documented in traditional Buddhist texts but are virtually undocumented in scientific literature on meditation. Within Buddhist traditions, (...)
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  49. Krishna Del Toso (forthcoming). The Function of Saññā in the Perceptive Activity According to the Sutta-Piṭaka. Philosophy East and West 65.3 (July 2015).score: 60.0
    This articles aims at pointing out the following considerations: (1) the word saññā, when used as technical term referring to a "normal" perception, indicates an ordering activity, based on the grasping of a distinctive mark, which involves (correct or wrong) recognition and naming; (2) although perception is in the Pāli Canon (Majjhima Nikāya I, 293) said to be a unitary event, nonetheless we can say that the action of saññā takes place after sensation (vedanā) and concerns the collection of the (...)
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  50. John Pickering (1995). Buddhism and Cognitivism: A Postmodern Appraisal. Asian Philosophy 5 (1):23 – 38.score: 54.0
    Abstract Cognitivism, presently the major paradigm of psychology, presents a scientific account of mental life. Buddhism also presents an account of mental life, but one which is integral with its wider ethical and transcendental concerns. The postmodern appraisal of science provides a framework within which these two accounts may be compared without inheriting many of the assumed oppositions between science and religion. It is concluded that cognitivism and Buddhism will have complementary roles in the development of a (...)
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