Search results for 'Buddhism Relations' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jon Carter Covell (forthcoming). Christian-Buddhist Relations Revealed in Art. Buddhist-Christian Studies.score: 156.0
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  2. Samu Sunim (forthcoming). Correction: Christian-Buddhist Relations Revealed in Art. Buddhist-Christian Studies.score: 156.0
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  3. In Sook Choi (2008). Relations of the Mind to the Matter in Kant's Philosophy and Buddhist Philosophy. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 8:63-71.score: 132.0
    Kant's epistemology and the Buddhist philosophy are an idealism. But these two different philosophies have in themselves the contradictory element, namely the element of the outer sense of bodies and of the inner mind. Although Kant's transcendental idealism and the school Vijnanavadin (唯識學派) acknowledge only the representations and the consciousnesses., the mind need to be affected by the outer part. In Kant's theoretical philosophy the outer sense of bodies plays an alien role. It stands outside the subject. In spite of (...)
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  4. Edward G. Muzika (1990). Object Relations Theory, Buddhism, and the Self. International Philosophical Quarterly 30 (1):59-74.score: 120.0
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  5. Ñāṇa (1935). The Paṭṭhānuddesa Dīpanī: Or the Buddhist Philosophy of Relations. U Ba Than & Daw Tin Tin.score: 120.0
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  6. Bimlendra Kumar (1988). Theory of Relations in Buddhist Philosophy. Eastern Book Linkers.score: 120.0
     
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  7. Brian D. Ruppert (forthcoming). Sin or Crime? Buddhism, Indebtedness, and the Construction of Social Relations in Early Medieval Japan. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies.score: 120.0
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  8. Bernard Faure (2004). Double Exposure: Cutting Across Buddhist and Western Discourses. Stanford University Press.score: 114.0
    This book explores the possible relations between Western types of rationality and Buddhism. It also examines some cliche;s about Buddhism and questions the old antinomies of Western culture (“faith and reason,” or “idealism and materialism”). The use of the Buddhist notion of the Two Truths as a hermeneutic device leads to a double or multiple exposure that will call into question our mental habits and force us to ask questions differently, to think “in a new key.” Double (...)
     
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  9. Masao Abe (1995). Buddhism and Interfaith Dialogue: Part One of a Two-Volume Sequel to Zen and Western Thought. University of Hawaiʻi Press.score: 96.0
    1 Buddhist-Christian Dialogue: Its Significance and Future Task1 The contemporary world is rapidly shrinking due to the remarkable advancement of science ...
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  10. Kewal Krishan Mittal (1992). Buddhist Perspective on the Religions and Philosophy of Life in India: Compendium of Papers Presented at an Academic Conference Held at Won Kwang University, Iri City, Korea, April 1991. Published by Abha Prakashan in Association with World Buddhist Cultural Foundation (India).score: 90.0
     
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  11. Sallie B. King (2006). An Engaged Buddhist Response to John Rawls's "The Law of Peoples". Journal of Religious Ethics 34 (4):637 - 661.score: 66.0
    In "The Law of Peoples", John Rawls proposes a set of principles for international relations, his "Law of Peoples." He calls this Law a "realistic utopia," and invites consideration of this Law from the perspectives of non-Western cultures. This paper considers Rawls's Law from the perspective of Engaged Buddhism, the contemporary form of socially and politically activist Buddhism. We find that Engaged Buddhists would be largely in sympathy with Rawls's proposals. There are differences, however: Rawls builds his (...)
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  12. Parimal G. Patil (2009). Against a Hindu God: Buddhist Philosophy of Religion in India. Columbia University Press.score: 66.0
    Comparative philosophy of religions -- Disciplinary challenges -- A grammar for comparison -- Comparative philosophy of religions -- Content, structure, and arguments -- Epistemology -- Religious epistemology in classical India: in defense of a Hindu god -- Interpreting Nyāya epistemology -- The Nyāya argument for the existence of Īśvara -- Defending the Nyāya argument -- Shifting the burden of proof -- Against Īśvara: Ratnakīrti's Buddhist critique -- The section on pervasion: the trouble with natural relations -- Two arguments -- (...)
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  13. Gerald Dōkō Virtbauer (2010). Dimensions of Intersubjectivity in Mahayana-Buddhism and Relational Psychoanalysis. Contemporary Buddhism 11 (1):85-102.score: 64.0
    Buddhism has become one of the main dialogue partners for different psychotherapeutic approaches. As a psychological ethical system, it offers structural elements that are compatible with psychotherapeutic theory and practice. A main concept in Mah?y?na-Buddhism and postmodern psychoanalysis is intersubjectivity. In relational psychoanalysis the individual is analysed within a matrix of relationships that turn out to be the central power in her/his psychological development. By realising why one has become the present individual and how personal development is connected (...)
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  14. Desheng Zong (2005). Three Language-Related Methods in Early Chinese Chan Buddhism. Philosophy East and West 55 (4):584-602.score: 60.0
    : It is an assertion routinely made that the rise of Chan represents a new stage in the development of Chinese Buddhism. But there can be no philosophical breakthrough without the discovery of new conceptual tools or perspectives. The histories and philosophical meanings of three language-related Chan methods are explored here; it is shown that not only are the methods vital to our understanding of Chan Buddhism but also they explain why Chan is so different from anything Chinese (...)
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  15. William C. Dell (2010). Deconstructing Zen: Apples and Oranges, Strings and Branes, and the Buddha's Belly. Millennial Mind Pub..score: 60.0
    William C. Dell teaches us to move our imaginations beyond the bounds of ordinary space time into the realm of eternal Zen consciousness, of the endless process of Zen deconstructing.
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  16. Donald W. Mitchell (ed.) (1998). Masao Abe: A Zen Life of Dialogue. C.E. Tuttle.score: 60.0
     
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  17. Douglas Ober (2013). 'Like Embers Hidden in Ashes, or Jewels Encrusted in Stone': Rāhul Sā[Ndot]K Tyāyan, Dharmānand KosambĪ and Buddhist Activity in Colonial India. Contemporary Buddhism 14 (1):134-148.score: 60.0
    Two of the most important modern Indian Buddhist pioneers are the polyglot explorer and Marxist revolutionary, R?hul S?[ndot]k ty?yan (1893?1963), and the Pali scholar and Gandhian nationalist, Dharm?nand Kosamb? (1876?1947). Although best known as scholars of Buddhism, it is their lesser-known personal lives?namely, their political involvement in anti-colonial efforts, social reform projects, and travels abroad?that are of primary focus in this study. Through an examination of their activities and writings, this essay reveals the methods they employed and the networks (...)
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  18. Mikael Gravers (2012). Monks, Morality and Military. The Struggle for Moral Power in Burma—and Buddhism's Uneasy Relation with Lay Power. Contemporary Buddhism 13 (1):1-33.score: 58.0
    In 2007, young Buddhist monks demonstrated against the military regime and its neglect of the economy and education, as well as against its repression. The monks applied Buddhism's ethical concepts as spiritual politics against the regime's increasing totalitarian tendencies. The article analyses and discusses how Buddhism and different notions of power characterize the struggle for democracy in Burma. The opposing sides, the young monks and the regime share a Buddhist cosmological imaginary. But they apply Buddhism differently in (...)
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  19. Nicholaos Jones (2010). Nyāya-Vaiśesika Inherence, Buddhist Reduction, and Huayan Total Power. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (2):215-230.score: 54.0
    This paper elaborates upon various responses to the Problem of the One over the Many, in the service of two central goals. The first is to situate Huayan's mereology within the context of Buddhism's historical development, showing its continuity with a broader tradition of philosophizing about part-whole relations. The second goal is to highlight the way in which Huayan's mereology combines the virtues of the Nyāya-Vaisheshika and Indian Buddhist solutions to the Problem of the One over the Many (...)
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  20. James Behuniak Jr (2009). Li in East Asian Buddhism: One Approach From Plato's Parmenides. Asian Philosophy 19 (1):31 – 49.score: 54.0
    In Plato's Parmenides , Socrates proposes a 'Day' analogy to express one possible model of part/whole relations. His analogy is swiftly rejected and replaced with another analogy, that of the 'Sail'. In this paper, it is argued that there is a profound difference between these two analogies and that the 'Day' represents a distinct way to think about part/whole relations. This way of thinking, I argue, is the standard way of thinking in East Asian Buddhism. Plato's 'Day' (...)
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  21. Cathy Byrne (2006). Would A Buddhist Freeze A Cane Toad?An Exploration Of The Modern Phenomenon Of Environmental Buddhism And The Ethics Related To The Doctrine Of Ahimsa (Non-Harming). Contemporary Buddhism 7 (2):117-127.score: 54.0
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  22. George Cristian Maior (2013). Human Rights: Political Tool or Universal Ethics? Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 12 (36):9-21.score: 54.0
    Recent developments in the Arab world reopen one of the most fertile debate topics in international relations theory: the universal nature of the concept “fundamental human rights” and their content. The perspectives are different, being influenced by an ideological background, especially theological, apparently contradictory, affecting the positions of major international actors, stimulating the revival of controversies on major differences between Western world and the developing societies. Through a balanced analysis, specific to critical postmodernism, of the way each civilization (according (...)
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  23. Yih-Hsien Yu (2007). The Categoreal Scheme in Hua-Yan Buddhism and Whitehead's Metaphysics. Process Studies 36 (2):306-329.score: 54.0
    If, after a century of analysis there is a turn to synthesis, Hua-Yan and Whitehead will become important resources. Especially given the radical difference of their historical contexts, their similarity is striking, but they differ on time. Whitehead is clear that relations to the future always differ in kind from those to the past, and Theravada Buddhist agree. But Hua-yan is open to a greater symmetry in enlightened experience.
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  24. Lisa Kemmerer (2012). Animals and World Religions: Rightful Relations. OUP USA.score: 54.0
    Despite increasing public attention to animal suffering, little seems to have changed: human beings continue to exploit billions of animals in factory farms, medical laboratories, and elsewhere. In this wide-ranging and perceptive study, Lisa Kemmerer shows how spiritual writings and teachings in seven major religious traditions can help people to consider their ethical obligations towards other creatures. -/- Kemmerer examines the role of animals in scripture and myth, the lives of religious exemplars, and foundational philosophical and moral teachings. Beginning with (...)
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  25. Jeffrey Grupp (2006). Mereological Nihilism: Quantum Atomism and the Impossibility of Material Constitution. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 16 (3):245-386.score: 48.0
    Mereological nihilism is the philosophical position that there are no items that have parts. If there are no items with parts then the only items that exist are partless fundamental particles, such as the true atoms (also called philosophical atoms) theorized to exist by some ancient philosophers, some contemporary physicists, and some contemporary philosophers. With several novel arguments I show that mereological nihilism is the correct theory of reality. I will also discuss strong similarities that mereological nihilism has with empirical (...)
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  26. S. J. Samartha & Lynn De Silva (eds.) (1979). Man in Nature: Guest or Engineer?: A Preliminary Enquiry by Christians and Buddhists Into the Religious Dimensions in Humanity's Relation to Nature. Ecumenical Institute for Study and Dialogue in Co-Operation with the World Council of Churches.score: 44.0
     
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  27. Dan Arnold (2010). Self-Awareness ( Svasaṃvitti ) and Related Doctrines of Buddhists Following Dignāga: Philosophical Characterizations of Some of the Main Issues. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (3):323-378.score: 42.0
    Framed as a consideration of the other contributions to the present volume of the Journal of Indian Philosophy , this essay attempts to scout and characterize several of the interrelated doctrines and issues that come into play in thinking philosophically about the doctrine of svasaṃvitti , particularly as that was elaborated by Dignāga and Dharmakīrti. Among the issues thus considered are the question of how mānasapratyakṣa (which is akin to manovijñāna ) might relate to svasaṃvitti ; how those related doctrines (...)
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  28. Frederick J. Streng (1991). Buddhist-Christian Dialogue in Relation to Science, Hermeneutical Scepticism, and Social-Economic Theory [Conf Discussion]. Buddhist-Christian Studies 11:247-264.score: 42.0
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  29. Kenneth K. Tanaka (2007). The Individual in Relation to the Sangha in American Buddhism: An Examination of''Privatized Religion''. Buddhist-Christian Studies 27 (1):115-127.score: 42.0
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  30. Francis Tiso (2006). On Buddhist-Christian Studies in Relation to Dialogue. Buddhist-Christian Studies 26 (1):iii-vi.score: 42.0
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  31. Brook Ziporyn (2010). Tiantai Buddhist Conceptions of "the Nature" (Xing) and its Relation to the Mind. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (3):493-512.score: 40.0
  32. Nandita Bandyopadhyay (1979). The Buddhist Theory of Relation Between Pramā and Pramā Na. Journal of Indian Philosophy 7 (1):43-78.score: 40.0
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  33. A. K. Sharma (1928). The Relation Between Buddhism and the Upanishads. The Monist 38 (3):443-477.score: 40.0
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  34. Rudolf Eucken & Paul Carus (1898). On the Philosophical Basis of Christianity in Its Relation to Buddhism. The Monist 8 (2):273-288.score: 40.0
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  35. Fabio Rambelli (forthcoming). The Ritual World of Buddhist" Shinto": The Reikiki and Initiations on Kami-Related Matters (Jingi Kanjō) in Late Medieval and Early-Modern Japan. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies.score: 40.0
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  36. Paul Carus (1898). On the Philosophical Basis of Christianity in its Relation to Buddhism. Letter From Prof. Rudolf Eucken of Jena. The Monist 8 (2):273 - 288.score: 40.0
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  37. Sanghamitra Dasgupta & Dilip Kumar Mohanta (1998). Some Reflections on the Relation Between Sankara And Buddhism. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 25:349-366.score: 40.0
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  38. Damayanti Ghosh (1978). Indian Thought in T. S. Eliot: An Analysis of the Works of T. S. Eliot in Relation to the Major Hindu-Buddhist Religious and Philosophical Texts. [REVIEW] Sanskrit Pustak Bhandar.score: 40.0
     
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  39. Michael Kurak (2003). The Relevance of the Buddhist Theory of Dependent Co-Origination to Cognitive Science. Brain and Mind 4 (3):341-351.score: 38.0
    The canonical Buddhist account of the cognitive processes underlying our experience of the world prefigures recent developments in neuroscience. The developments in question are centered on two main trends in neuroscience research and thinking. The first of these involves the idea that our everyday experience of ourselves and of the world consists in a series of discrete microstates. The second closely related notion is that affective structures and systems play critical roles in governing the formation of such states. Both of (...)
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  40. Jay L. Garfield (2002). Empty Words: Buddhist Philosophy and Cross-Cultural Interpretation. Oxford University Press.score: 38.0
    This volume collects Jay Garfield's essays on Madhyamaka, Yogacara, Buddhist ethics and cross-cultural hermeneutics. The first part addresses Madhyamaka, supplementing Garfield's translation of Fundamental Wisdom of the Middle Way (OUP, 1995), a foundational philosophical text by the Buddhist saint Nagarjuna. Garfield then considers the work of philosophical rivals, and sheds important light on the relation of Nagarjuna's views to other Buddhist and non-Buddhist philosophical positions.
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  41. Christian Coseru (2012). Perceiving Reality: Consciousness, Intentionality, and Cognition in Buddhist Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 38.0
    What turns the continuous flow of experience into perceptually distinct objects? Can our verbal descriptions unambiguously capture what it is like to see, hear, or feel? How might we reason about the testimony that perception alone discloses? Christian Coseru proposes a rigorous and highly original way to answer these questions by developing a framework for understanding perception as a mode of apprehension that is intentionally constituted, pragmatically oriented, and causally effective. By engaging with recent discussions in phenomenology and analytic philosophy (...)
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  42. Monima Chadha (forthcoming). Meditation and Unity of Consciousness: A Perspective From Buddhist Epistemology. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-17.score: 38.0
    The paper argues that empirical work on Buddhist meditation has an impact on Buddhist epistemology, in particular their account of unity of consciousness. I explain the Buddhist account of unity of consciousness and show how it relates to contemporary philosophical accounts of unity of consciousness. The contemporary accounts of unity of consciousness are closely integrated with the discussion of neural correlates of consciousness. The conclusion of the paper suggests a new direction in the search for neural correlates of state consciousness (...)
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  43. Martin Kovan (2013). 'Freedom/Ignorance': Buddhist-Ontological Non-Duality and Metaethics in an Age of Terror. Sophia 52 (2):381-395.score: 38.0
    This essay considers some meta-ethical questions that emerge from a consideration of the phenomena of terrorism in the context of Buddhist metaphysics: what, in the Buddhist view, ultimately causes terrorism (and its subsidiary effects)? What resources do the Buddhist metaphysical claims of no-self, karma, emptiness and related concepts bring to a meta-ethical understanding of terrorism and its effects?
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  44. Jared R. Lindahl, Christopher T. Kaplan, Evan M. Winget & Willoughby B. Britton (2013). A Phenomenology of Meditation-Induced Light Experiences: Traditional Buddhist and Neurobiological Perspectives. Frontiers in Psychology 4:973.score: 38.0
    The scientific study of Buddhist meditation has proceeded without much attention to Buddhist literature that details the range of psychological and physiological changes thought to occur during meditation. This paper presents reports of various meditation-induced light experiences derived from American Buddhist practitioners. The reports of light experiences are classified into two main types: discrete lightforms and patterned or diffuse lights. Similar phenomena are well documented in traditional Buddhist texts but are virtually undocumented in scientific literature on meditation. Within Buddhist traditions, (...)
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  45. Jan Westerhoff, Jay Garfield, Tom Tillemans, Graham Priest, Georges Dreyfus, Sonam Thakchoe, Guy Newland, Mark Siderits, Brownwyn Finnigan & Koji Tanaka (2011). Moonshadows. Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 38.0
    The doctrine of the two truths - a conventional truth and an ultimate truth - is central to Buddhist metaphysics and epistemology. The two truths (or two realities), the distinction between them, and the relation between them is understood variously in different Buddhist schools; it is of special importance to the Madhyamaka school. One theory is articulated with particular force by Nagarjuna (2nd ct CE) who famously claims that the two truths are identical to one another and yet distinct. One (...)
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  46. Chipamong Chowdhury (2012). Jeffrey Samuels. Attracting the Heart: Social Relations and the Aesthetics of Emotion in Sri Lankan Monastic Culture. Contemporary Buddhism 13 (1):173-176.score: 36.0
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  47. Susan Conway (2009). Shan Tribute Relations in the Nineteenth Century. Contemporary Buddhism 10 (1):31-37.score: 36.0
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  48. Tse-fu Kuan (2012). Cognitive Operations in Buddhist Meditation: Interface with Western Psychology. Contemporary Buddhism 13 (1):35-60.score: 34.0
    This paper interprets Buddhist meditation from perspectives of Western psychology and explores the common grounds shared by the two disciplines. Cognitive operations in Buddhist meditation are mainly characterized by mindfulness and concentration in relation to attention. Mindfulness in particular plays a pivotal role in regulating attention. My study based on Buddhist literature corroborates significant correspondence between mindfulness and metacognition as propounded by some psychologists. In vipassan? meditation, mindfulness regulates attention in such a way that attention is directed to monitor the (...)
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  49. Matthew MacKenzie (2008). Self-Awareness Without a Self: Buddhism and the Reflexivity of Awareness. Asian Philosophy 18 (3):245 – 266.score: 30.0
    _In this paper, I show that a robust, reflexivist account of self-awareness (such as was defended by Dignamacrga and Dharmakīrti, most phenomenologists, and others) is compatible with reductionist view of persons, and hence with a rejection of the existence of a substantial, separate self. My main focus is on the tension between Buddhist reflexivism and the central Buddhist doctrine of no-self. In the first section of the paper, I give a brief sketch of reflexivist (...)
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  50. Chien-Hsing Ho (2008). The Finger Pointing Toward the Moon: A Philosophical Analysis of the Chinese Buddhist Thought of Reference. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (1):159-177.score: 30.0
    In this essay I attempt a philosophical analysis of the Chinese Buddhist thought of linguistic reference to shed light on how the Buddhist understands the way language refers to an ineffable reality. For this purpose, the essay proceeds in two directions: an enquiry into the linguistic thoughts of Sengzhao (374-414 CE) and Jizang (549-623 CE), two leading Chinese Madhyamika thinkers, and an analysis of the Buddhist simile of a moon-pointing finger. The two approaches respectively constitute the horizontal and vertical axes (...)
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