Search results for 'Buddhist ethics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Mark T. Unno (1999). Questions in the Making: A Review Essay on Zen Buddhist Ethics in the Context of Buddhist and Comparative Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 27 (3):507 - 536.score: 246.0
    In reviewing four works from the 1990s-monographs by Christopher Ives and Phillip Olson on Zen Buddhist ethics, Damien Keown's treatment of Indian Buddhist ethics, and an edited collection on Buddhism and human rights-this article examines recent scholarship on Zen Buddhist ethics in light of issues in Buddhist and comparative ethics. It highlights selected themes in the notional and real encounter of Zen Buddhism with Western thought and culture as presented in the reviewed (...)
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  2. Peter Harvey & Mark Siderits (2004). An Introduction to Buddhist Ethics: Foundations, Values and Issues. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (3):405–409.score: 240.0
    This systematic introduction to Buddhist ethics is aimed at anyone interested in Buddhism, including students, scholars and general readers. Peter Harvey is the author of the acclaimed Introduction to Buddhism (Cambridge, 1990), and his new book is written in a clear style, assuming no prior knowledge. At the same time it develops a careful, probing analysis of the nature and practical dynamics of Buddhist ethics in both its unifying themes and in the particularities of different (...) traditions. The book applies Buddhist ethics to a range of issues of contemporary concern: humanity's relationship with the rest of nature; economics; war and peace; euthanasia; abortion; the status of women; and homosexuality. Professor Harvey draws on texts of the main Buddhist traditions, and on historical and contemporary accounts of the behaviour of Buddhists, to describe existing Buddhist ethics, to assess different views within it, and to extend its application into new areas. (shrink)
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  3. Charles Goodman (2009). Consequences of Compassion: An Interpretation and Defense of Buddhist Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 240.0
    Fundamental Buddhist teachings -- Main features of some western ethical theories -- Teravāda ethics as rule-consequentialism -- Mahāyāna ethics before Śāntideva and after -- Transcending ethics -- Buddhist ethics and the demands of consequentialism -- Buddhism on moral responsibility -- Punishment -- Objections and replies -- A Buddhist response to Kant.
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  4. Damien Keown (2005). Buddhist Ethics: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.score: 240.0
    The latter half of the twentieth century witnessed a growing interest in Buddhism, and it continues to capture the imagination of many in the West who see it as either an alternative or a supplement to their own religious beliefs. Numerous introductory books have appeared in recent years to cater to this growing interest, but almost none devotes attention to the specifically ethical dimensions of the tradition. For various complex cultural and historical reasons, ethics has not received as much (...)
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  5. Susanne Mrozik (2007). Virtuous Bodies: The Physical Dimensions of Morality in Buddhist Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 240.0
    Virtuous Bodies breaks new ground in the field of Buddhist ethics by investigating the diverse roles bodies play in ethical development. Traditionally, Buddhists assumed a close connection between body and morality. Thus Buddhist literature contains descriptions of living beings that stink with sin, are disfigured by vices, or are perfumed and adorned with virtues. Taking an influential early medieval Indian Mahayana Buddhist text-Santideva's Compendium of Training (Siksasamuccaya)-as a case study, Susanne Mrozik demonstrates that Buddhists regarded ethical (...)
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  6. Charles Wei-hsun Fu & Sandra A. Wawrytko (eds.) (1991). Buddhist Ethics and Modern Society: An International Symposium. Greenwood Press.score: 240.0
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  7. Stefano Pace (2013). Does Religion Affect the Materialism of Consumers? An Empirical Investigation of Buddhist Ethics and the Resistance of the Self. Journal of Business Ethics 112 (1):25-46.score: 234.0
    This paper investigates the effects of Buddhist ethics on consumers’ materialism, that is, the propensity to attach a fundamental role to possessions. The literature shows that religion and religiosity influence various attitudes and behaviors of consumers, including their ethical beliefs and ethical decisions. However, most studies focus on general religiosity rather than on the specific doctrinal ethical tenets of religions. The current research focuses on Buddhism and argues that it can tame materialism directly, similar to other religions, and (...)
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  8. H. Saddhatissa (1997). Buddhist Ethics. Wisdom.score: 222.0
    Analyzes, examines, and explains ethical concepts from a primarily Buddhist point of view.
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  9. Christopher Ives (2009). Imperial-Way Zen: Ichikawa Hakugen's Critique and Lingering Questions for Buddhist Ethics. University of Hawai'i Press.score: 210.0
    Despite the importance of Ichikawa's writings, this volume is the first by any scholar to outline his critique.
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  10. Damien Keown, John Powers & Charles S. Prebish (eds.) (2010). Destroying Mara Forever: Buddhist Ethics Essays in Honor of Damien Keown. Snow Lion Publications.score: 210.0
    Several contributions in the book show how these principles apply to contemporary problems and moral issues.
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  11. Damien Keown (1992). The Nature of Buddhist Ethics. St. Martin's Press.score: 210.0
     
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  12. Winston L. King (1964). In the Hope of Nibbana; an Essay on Theravada Buddhist Ethics. Lasalle, Ill.,Open Court.score: 210.0
  13. Konrad Meisig (ed.) (2011). Beginnings of Buddhist Ethics: The Chinese Parallel to the Kūṭadantasutta. O. Harrassowitz.score: 210.0
     
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  14. G. S. P. Misra (1984). Development of Buddhist Ethics. Munshiram Manoharlal.score: 210.0
     
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  15. Ram Kumar Ratnam & V. M. (2011). Buddhist Ethics in Impermanence. D.K. Printworld.score: 210.0
  16. H. Saddhatissa (1971). Buddhist Ethics. New York,G. Braziller.score: 210.0
     
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  17. H. Saddhatissa (1970). Buddhist Ethics: Essence of Buddhism. London,Allen & Unwin.score: 210.0
     
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  18. Maheśa Tivārī (ed.) (1989). Perspectives on Buddhist Ethics. Sole Distributor, Eastern Book Linkers.score: 210.0
     
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  19. Vyanjana (1992). Theravāda Buddhist Ethics with Special Reference to Visuddhimagga. Punthi Pustak.score: 210.0
  20. Padmasiri De Silva (1998). Environmental Philosophy and Ethics in Buddhism. St. Martin's Press.score: 204.0
    This work introduces the reader to the central issues and theories in Western environmental ethics, and against this background develops a Buddhist environmental philosophy and ethics. Drawing material from original sources, there is a lucid exposition of Buddhist environmentalism, its ethics, economics and Buddhist perspectives for environmental education. The work is focused on a diagnosis of the contemporary environmental crisis and a Buddhist contribution for positive solutions. Replete with stories and illustrations from original (...)
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  21. Maria Heim (2011). Buddhist Ethics: A Review Essay. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (3):571-584.score: 198.0
    I argue that three recent studies (Imagining the Life Course, by Nancy Eberhardt; Sensory Biographies, by Robert Desjarlais; and How to Behave, by Anne Hansen) advance the field of Buddhist Ethics in the direction of the empirical study of morality. I situate their work within a larger context of moral anthropology, that is, the study of human nature in its limits and capacities for moral agency. Each of these books offers a finely grained account of particular and local (...)
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  22. Sallie B. King (2005). Being Benevolence: The Social Ethics of Engaged Buddhism. University of Hawaiì Press.score: 194.0
    Building from tradition -- Engaged Buddhist ethical theory -- Individual and society -- Human rights -- Nonviolence and its limits -- Justice/reconciliation.
     
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  23. Pragati Sahni (2008). Environmental Ethics in Buddhism: A Virtues Approach. Routledge.score: 192.0
    This work gives an innovative approach to the subject, which puts forward a distinctly Buddhist environmental ethics that is in harmony with traditional ...
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  24. Robert M. Ellis (2011). A New Buddhist Ethics. Lulu.com.score: 192.0
    This book is a survey of practical moral issues applying the Middle Way (as developed in 'A Theory of Moral Objectivity') as the basis of 'Buddhist' Ethics. No appeal is made to Buddhist traditions or scriptures, but instead the Middle Way is applied consistently as a universal philosophical and practical principle to suggest the direction of resolutions to moral debates. Practical ethics topics covered include sexual ethics, medical ethics, environmental ethics, animals, violence, the (...)
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  25. Christian Coseru (2008). A Review of Zen Buddhism and Environmental Ethics. [REVIEW] Sophia 47 (1):75-77.score: 192.0
    Simon P. James' Zen Buddhism and Environmental Ethics offers an engaging, sophisticated, and well-argued defence of the notion that Zen Buddhism has something positive to offer the environmental movement. James' goal is two-fold: first, dispel criticism that Zen (by virtue of its anti-philosophical stance) lacks an ethical program (because it shuns conventional morality), has no concern for the environment at large (because it adopts a thoroughly anthropocentric stance), and deprives living entities of any intrinsic worth (because it operates from (...)
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  26. Joanna Rogers Macy (1979). Dependent Co-Arising: The Distinctiveness of Buddhist Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 7 (1):38 - 52.score: 186.0
    The doctrine of paṭicca samuppāda or dependent co-arising is fundamental to Buddhist ethics. In this vision of radical relativity, reality appears as an interdependent process wherein change and choice, doer and deed, person and community are mutually causative. Morality is grounded in this interdependence, as in the corrollary Buddhist views of anattā and karma. Consequently it reveals a reciprocal dynamic between personal and social transformation, expressed in Buddhist scripture and illustrated in a contemporary Buddhist movement (...)
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  27. Sangharakshita (1998). Know Your Mind: The Psychological Dimension of Ethics in Buddhism. Windhorse.score: 186.0
    Know Your Mind is an accessible introduction to traditional Buddhist psychology, offering a clear description of the nature of mind and how it functions.
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  28. Andrew Fenton (2009). Buddhism and Neuroethics: The Ethics of Pharmaceutical Cognitive Enhancement. Developing World Bioethics 9 (2):47-56.score: 180.0
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  29. Jay Garfield, Buddhist Ethics.score: 180.0
    There are two temptations to be resisted when approaching Buddhist moral theory. The first is to assimilate Buddhist ethics to some system of Western ethics, usually either some form of Utilitarianism or some form of virtue ethics. The second is to portray Buddhist ethical thought as constituting some grand system resembling those that populate Western metaethics. The first temptation, of course, can be avoided simply by avoiding the second. In Buddhist philosophical and religious (...)
     
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  30. Michael G. Barnhart (2012). Theory and Comparison in the Discussion of Buddhist Ethics. Philosophy East and West 62 (1):16-43.score: 180.0
    Comparisons, and by that I mean the hunt for essential similarities or at least serious family resemblances, between the ethical views of Western and non-Western thinkers have been a staple of comparative philosophy for quite some time now. Some of these comparisons, such as between the views of Aristotle and Confucius, seem especially apt and revealing. However, I’ve often wondered whether Western “ethical theory”—virtue ethics, deontology, or consequentialism—is always the best lens through which to approach non-Western ethical thought. Particularly (...)
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  31. James Mark Shields (2012). Imperial-Way Zen: Ichikawa Hakugen's Critique and Lingering Questions for Buddhist Ethics. Philosophy East and West 62 (1):128-130.score: 180.0
    While there has been a surge in scholarship on Imperial Way Buddhism (kōdō Bukkyō) in the past several decades, little attention has been paid, particularly in Western scholarship, to the life and work of Ichikawa Hakugen (1902–1986), the most prominent and sophisticated postwar critic of the role of Buddhism, and particularly Zen, in modern Japanese militarism. By way of a thorough and critical investigation of Ichikawa’s critique, Imperial-Way Zen: Ichikawa Hakugen’s Critique and Lingering Questions for Buddhist Ethics by (...)
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  32. S. Tachibana (1992/1975). The Ethics of Buddhism. Curzon Press.score: 180.0
    This is the 'Middle Way', with eight qualities or virtues - understanding, thought, speech, action, livelihood, effort, mindfulness and concentration - that ...
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  33. Gordon Fraser Davis (2013). Moral Realism and Anti-Realism Outside the West: A Meta-Ethical Turn in Buddhist Ethics. Comparative Philosophy 4 (2).score: 180.0
    In recent years, discussions of Buddhist ethics have increasingly drawn upon the concepts and tools of modern ethical theory, not only to compare Buddhist perspectives with Western moral theories, but also to assess the meta-ethical implications of Buddhist texts and their philosophical context. Philosophers aiming to defend the Madhyamaka framework in particular – its ethics and soteriology along with its logic and epistemology – have recently attempted to explain its combination of moral commitment and philosophical (...)
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  34. Roderick Hindery (1978). Comparative Ethics in Hindu and Buddhist Traditions. Motilal Banarsidass.score: 180.0
    The book contains elaborate notes, two appendices, critical textual matter, a diagram of topical parallels, a bibliography, and an index.
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  35. Sivaraksa Sulak (1991). Buddhist Ethics and Modern Politics: A Theravada Viewpoint. In. In Charles Wei-Hsun Fu & Sandra A. Wawrytko (eds.), Buddhist Ethics and Modern Society: An International Symposium. Greenwood Press. 159--166.score: 180.0
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  36. Roongraung Boonyoros (1991). Buddhist Ethics in Everyday Life in Thailand: A Village Experiment. In. In Charles Wei-Hsun Fu & Sandra A. Wawrytko (eds.), Buddhist Ethics and Modern Society: An International Symposium. Greenwood Press. 215--228.score: 180.0
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  37. Kodo Matsunami (1991). The Three Treasures as the Basis of Buddhist Ethics and Their Application in Daily Life. In. In Charles Wei-Hsun Fu & Sandra A. Wawrytko (eds.), Buddhist Ethics and Modern Society: An International Symposium. Greenwood Press. 10--11.score: 180.0
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  38. Ok-Sun An (1997). Compassion and Benevolence: A Comparative Study of Early Buddhist and Classical Confucian Ethics. Peter Lang.score: 180.0
  39. John Hurrell Crook (1991). Buddhist Ethics and the Problem of Ethnic Minorities: The Case of Ladakh. In Charles Wei-Hsun Fu & Sandra A. Wawrytko (eds.), Buddhist Ethics and Modern Society: An International Symposium. Greenwood Press.score: 180.0
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  40. Charles Wei-Hsun Fu & 傅偉勳 (1991). From Paramartha-Satya to Samvrti-Satya: An Attempt at Constructive Modernization of (Mahayana) Buddhist Ethics. In Charles Wei-Hsun Fu & Sandra A. Wawrytko (eds.), Buddhist Ethics and Modern Society: An International Symposium. Greenwood Press.score: 180.0
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  41. Kulatissa Nanda Jayatilleke (1972). Ethics in Buddhist Perspective. Kandy, Ceylon,Buddhist Publication Society.score: 180.0
     
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  42. Bhikkhu Mettanando (1991). Buddhist Ethics in the Practice of Medicine. In. In Charles Wei-Hsun Fu & Sandra A. Wawrytko (eds.), Buddhist Ethics and Modern Society: An International Symposium. Greenwood Press. 195--213.score: 180.0
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  43. H. S. Prasad (2007). The Centrality of Ethics in Buddhism: Exploratory Essays. Motilal Banarsidass Publishers.score: 180.0
     
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  44. Leopold Ratnasekera (2006). The Theravāda Buddhist Understanding of Ethics: A Critical Appraisal of the Eight-Fold Path of Moral Perfection: A Study in Contrast with Thomistic Moral Perspectives. Pontificia Universitas Urbaniana, Facolta Di Filosofia.score: 180.0
  45. Xingyun (1998). Being Good: Buddhist Ethics for Everyday Life. Weatherhill.score: 174.0
    The aim of this book is simple: to invite readers to consider what it means to lead a good life, and to offer practical advice, based on the Buddhist teachings, as to how this can be accomplished. In each of more than thirty brief essays, Master Hsing Yun treats a specific moral or ethical issue, using quotations from the rich treasury of the Buddhist scriptures as a point of departure for his discussion. Among the topics he considers are (...)
     
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  46. Milan Vukomanovic (2004). Schopenhauer and Wittgenstein: Assessing the Buddhist Influences on Their Conceptions of Ethics. Filozofija I Drustvo 24:163-187.score: 168.0
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  47. Robert Aitken (1984). The Mind of Clover: Essays in Zen Buddhist Ethics. North Point Press.score: 168.0
    In Taking the Path of Zen , Robert Aitken provided a concise guide to zazen (Zen meditation) and other aspects of the practice of Zen. In The Mind of Clover he addresses the world beyond the zazen cushions, illuminating issues of appropriate personal and social action through an exploration of the philosophical complexities of Zen ethics. Aitken's approach is clear and sure as he shows how our minds can be as nurturing as clover, which enriches the soil and benefits (...)
     
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  48. Alastair S. Gunn (2008). Buddhism and Environmental Ethics in Context. Centre for Civilisational Dialogue, University of Malaya.score: 168.0
     
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  49. Karma Lekshe Tsomo (2012). Compassion, Ethics, and Neuroscience: Neuroethics Through Buddhist Eyes. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (3):529-537.score: 162.0
    As scientists advance knowledge of the brain and develop technologies to measure, evaluate, and manipulate brain function, numerous questions arise for religious adherents. If neuroscientists can conclusively establish that there is a functional network between neural impulses and an individual’s capacity for moral evaluation of situations, this will naturally lead to questions about the relationship between such a network and constructions of moral value and ethical human behavior. For example, if cognitive neuroscience can show that there is a neurophysiological basis (...)
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  50. Oyuna Dorzhiguishaeva (2008). Tolerance as the Basic Category of Buddhist Ethics. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 23:13-19.score: 162.0
    The concept of tolerance is one of the basic ethical categories of Buddhism. Showing conscious tolerance, you control a situation and do not allow feelings, such as anger or arrogance to take top above reason. Besides, the tolerance to other people and different situation shows your wide scope and common emancipation. The tolerance is one of qualities inherent to bodhisattvas - sacred Buddhists. These qualities are called paramita, and paramita of tolerance - kshanti-paramita. Kshanti-paramita is triple: tolerance to other alive (...)
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