Search results for 'Buddhist philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  44
    Christian Coseru (2012). Perceiving Reality: Consciousness, Intentionality, and Cognition in Buddhist Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    What turns the continuous flow of experience into perceptually distinct objects? Can our verbal descriptions unambiguously capture what it is like to see, hear, or feel? How might we reason about the testimony that perception alone discloses? Christian Coseru proposes a rigorous and highly original way to answer these questions by developing a framework for understanding perception as a mode of apprehension that is intentionally constituted, pragmatically oriented, and causally effective. By engaging with recent discussions in phenomenology and analytic (...) of mind, but also by drawing on the work of Husserl and Merleau-Ponty, Coseru offers a sustained argument that Buddhist philosophers, in particular those who follow the tradition of inquiry initiated by Dign?ga and Dharmak?rti, have much to offer when it comes to explaining why epistemological disputes about the evidential role of perceptual experience cannot satisfactorily be resolved without taking into account the structure of our cognitive awareness. -/- Perceiving Reality examines the function of perception and its relation to attention, language, and discursive thought, and provides new ways of conceptualizing the Buddhist defense of the reflexivity thesis of consciousness-namely, that each cognitive event is to be understood as involving a pre-reflective implicit awareness of its own occurrence. Coseru advances an innovative approach to Buddhist philosophy of mind in the form of phenomenological naturalism, and moves beyond comparative approaches to philosophy by emphasizing the continuity of concerns between Buddhist and Western philosophical accounts of the nature of perceptual content and the character of perceptual consciousness. (shrink)
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  2.  81
    William Edelglass & Jay L. Garfield (eds.) (2009). Buddhist Philosophy: Essential Readings. Oxford University Press.
    This volume is an ideal single text for an intermediate or advanced course in Buddhist philosophy, and makes this tradition immediately accessible to the ...
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  3. Jiri Benovsky (forthcoming). Buddhist Philosophy and the Non-Self View. Philosophy East and West.
    A widespread interpretation of Buddhist thought concerning the Self makes a prominent place for the claim that there is no Self. This claim is motivated, in Buddhist philosophy, by the idea that if there were a Self, it would have to be a permanent entity that would be a 'bearer' of individual psychological states, but that since there is no such permanent bearer, there is no Self. In this article, I challenge a core assumption of this line (...)
     
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  4. Jay Garfield & William Edelgass (eds.) (2009). Buddhist Philosophy: Essential Readings. OUP Usa.
    The Buddhist philosophical tradition is vast, internally diverse, and comprises texts written in a variety of canonical languages. It is hence often difficult for those with training in Western philosophy who wish to approach this tradition for the first time to know where to start, and difficult for those who wish to introduce and teach courses in Buddhist philosophy to find suitable textbooks that adequately represent the diversity of the tradition, expose students to important primary texts (...)
     
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  5.  2
    Karl H. Potter (1970). Buddhist Philosophy From 350 to 600 A.D. In The Encyclopedia of Indian Philosophies. Motilal Banarsidass
    This, the third Volume in this Encyclopedia to deal with Buddhist philosophy, takes the reader from the middle of the sixth. Many of the authors and texts treated here are not well known to the casual student of Buddhism.
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  6.  7
    Jan Westerhoff, Jay Garfield, Tom Tillemans, Graham Priest, Georges Dreyfus, Sonam Thakchoe, Guy Newland, Mark Siderits, Brownwyn Finnigan & Koji Tanaka (2011). Moonshadows. Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    The doctrine of the two truths - a conventional truth and an ultimate truth - is central to Buddhist metaphysics and epistemology. The two truths (or two realities), the distinction between them, and the relation between them is understood variously in different Buddhist schools; it is of special importance to the Madhyamaka school. One theory is articulated with particular force by Nagarjuna (2nd ct CE) who famously claims that the two truths are identical to one another and yet (...)
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  7.  1
    Nolan Pliny Jacobson (2010). The Heart of Buddhist Philosophy. Southern Illinois University Press.
    In arriving at the heart of Buddhist philosophy, Nolan Pliny Jacobson attempts to eliminate some of the confusion in the West concerning the Buddhist view of what is concrete and ultimately real in the world. Jacobson presents Nāgārjuna, the Plato of the Buddhist tradition, as the major exemplar of the Buddhist expression of life. In his comparison of Buddhism and Western theology, Jacobson demonstrates that some efforts in Western religious thought approach the Buddhist empirical (...)
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  8.  27
    Stephen J. Laumakis (2008). An Introduction to Buddhist Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    In this clearly written undergraduate textbook, Stephen Laumakis explains the origin and development of Buddhist ideas and concepts, focusing on the philosophical ideas and arguments presented and defended by selected thinkers and sutras from various traditions. He starts with a sketch of the Buddha and the Dharma, and highlights the origins of Buddhism in India. He then considers specific details of the Dharma with special attention to Buddhist metaphysics and epistemology, and examines the development of Buddhism in China, (...)
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  9.  89
    Jay L. Garfield (2002). Empty Words: Buddhist Philosophy and Cross-Cultural Interpretation. Oxford University Press.
    This volume collects Jay Garfield 's essays on Madhyamaka, Yogacara, Buddhist ethics and cross-cultural hermeneutics. The first part addresses Madhyamaka, supplementing Garfield 's translation of Fundamental Wisdom of the Middle Way, a foundational philosophical text by the Buddhist saint Nagarjuna. Garfield then considers the work of philosophical rivals, and sheds important light on the relation of Nagarjuna's views to other Buddhist and non-Buddhist philosophical positions.
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  10.  11
    Parimal G. Patil (2009). Against a Hindu God: Buddhist Philosophy of Religion in India. Columbia University Press.
    Comparative philosophy of religions -- Disciplinary challenges -- A grammar for comparison -- Comparative philosophy of religions -- Content, structure, and arguments -- Epistemology -- Religious epistemology in classical India: in defense of a Hindu god -- Interpreting Nyāya epistemology -- The Nyāya argument for the existence of Īśvara -- Defending the Nyāya argument -- Shifting the burden of proof -- Against Īśvara: Ratnakīrti's Buddhist critique -- The section on pervasion: the trouble with natural relations -- Two (...)
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  11. Mark Siderits (2003). Personal Identity and Buddhist Philosophy: Empty Persons. Ashgate.
    This book initiates a conversation between the two traditions showing how concepts and tools drawn from one philosophical tradition can help solve problems ...
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  12.  17
    Antoine Panaioti (2012). Nietzsche and Buddhist Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; Part I. Nihilism and Buddhism: 1. Nietzsche as Buddha; 2. Nietzsche as anti-Buddha; Part II. Suffering: 3. Amor Fati and the affirmation of suffering; 4. Nirvana and the cessation of suffering; Part III. Compassion: 5. Overcoming compassion; 6. Cultivating compassion; Conclusion: toward a new response to the challenge of nihilism.
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  13. David J. Kalupahana (1992). A History of Buddhist Philosophy Continuities and Discontinuities. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  14. David J. Kalupahana (1978). Buddhist Philosophy: A Historical Analysis. Philosophical Review 87 (2):316-319.
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  15.  40
    Peter Jilks (2008). Review of Mark Siderits, Buddhism as Philosophy. [REVIEW] Sophia 47 (1):79-82.
    Siderits’ book is a welcome contribution to the ongoing dialogue between Buddhism and Western analytic philosophy. It covers the three main areas of philosophical enquiry—metaphysics, ethics and epistemology. Although conceptually quite challenging in places, the information is always presented in a pedagogic, evolutionary and highly readable manner. There are occasional problems with Siderits’ approach of isolating Buddhism as philosophy from Buddhism as religion, particularly in his chapter on ethics, which cannot avoid being somewhat unbalanced, and possibly misrepresentational, as (...)
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  16. Ẓahīruddīn Aḥmad (2007). An Introduction to Buddhist Philosophy in India and Tibet. International Academy of Indian Culture and Aditya Prakashan.
     
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  17. Khenpo Chimed (2012). Nine Yana: Teaching on the Nine Vehicles According to the Buddhist Philosophy. Aditya Prakashan.
     
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  18. Edward Conze (1983). Buddhist Thought in India: Three Phases of Buddhist Philosophy. Allen & Unwin.
  19. Vincent Eltschinger (2012). Caste and Buddhist Philosophy: Continuity of Some Buddhist Arguments Against the Realist Interpretation of Social Denominations. Motilal Banarsidass Publishers.
     
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  20. Ke Padmārāvu (2007). Buddhist Philosophy or the Message of the Buddha. Lokayata Prachuranalu.
     
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  21. Karl H. Potter (1970). Buddhist Philosophy From 100 to 350 A.D. In The Encyclopedia of Indian Philosophies. Motilal Banarsidass
     
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  22. Rathnapala Subasinghe (2011). Unification and Disintegration: A Theory of Life on Buddhist Philosophy. Godage International Publishers.
     
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  23.  11
    Herbert V. Guenther (1971). Buddhist Philosophy in Theory and Practice. Baltimore,Penguin Books.
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  24.  33
    In Sook Choi (2008). Relations of the Mind to the Matter in Kant's Philosophy and Buddhist Philosophy. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 8:63-71.
    Kant's epistemology and the Buddhist philosophy are an idealism. But these two different philosophies have in themselves the contradictory element, namely the element of the outer sense of bodies and of the inner mind. Although Kant's transcendental idealism and the school Vijnanavadin (唯識學派) acknowledge only the representations and the consciousnesses., the mind need to be affected by the outer part. In Kant's theoretical philosophy the outer sense of bodies plays an alien role. It stands outside the subject. (...)
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  25.  2
    Malcolm Keating (2015). Indian Buddhist Philosophy by Amber D. Carpenter. Philosophy East and West 65 (3):1000-1003.
    Review of Amber Carpenter's "Indian Buddhist Philosophy.".
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  26.  12
    Arthur Berriedale Keith (1923). Buddhist Philosophy in India and Ceylon. Gordon Press.
    Asl. Atthasalinl of Buddhaghosa, ed. PTS. 1897. BB. Bibliotheca Buddhica, Petrograd. BC. Buddhacarita, ed. Cowell, Oxford, 1893. BCA. ...
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  27.  12
    Satkari Mookerjee (1935). The Buddhist Philosophy of Universal Flux: An Exposition of the Philosophy of Critical Realism as Expounded by the School of Dignāga. Motilal Banarsidass.
    The work is divided into two parts arranged into 26 chapters.
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  28. Beni Madhab Barua (1974). Prolegomena to a History of Buddhist Philosophy. Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers.
     
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  29. Douglas A. Fox (1973). The Vagrant Lotus: An Introduction to Buddhist Philosophy. Philadelphia,Westminster Press.
     
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  30. Kenneth K. Inada (1985). Guide to Buddhist Philosophy. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  31.  3
    Lawrence J. McCrea (2010). Buddhist Philosophy of Language in India: Jnanasrimitra's Monograph on Exclusion. Columbia University Press.
    This volume marks the first English translation of Jnanasrimitra's Monograph on Exclusion, a careful, critical investigation into language, perception, and conceptual awareness.
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  32. Hajime Nakamura (1962). The Concept of Man in Buddhist Philosophy.
     
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  33. G. C. Nayak (ed.) (1984). Analytical Studies in Buddhist Philosophy. P.G. Dept. Of Philosophy, Utkal University.
     
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  34. A. M. Pi͡atigorskiĭ (1984). The Buddhist Philosophy of Thought: Essays in Interpretation. Barnes & Noble.
     
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  35. Vijaya Rani (1982). The Buddhist Philosophy as Presented in Mīmāṁsā-Śloka-Vārttika. Parimal Publications.
     
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  36. V. V. S. Saibaba (2003). Facets of Buddhist Philosophy: Theravada and Mahayana. Dept. Of Philosophy & Religious Studies, Andhra Univ..
     
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  37. Mark Siderits (2007). Buddhism as Philosophy: An Introduction. Hackett Pub. Co..
     
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  38.  6
    Dale S. Wright (2015). Inaugural Reflections for the Journal of Buddhist Philosophy. Journal of Buddhist Philosophy 1:5-12.
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  39.  16
    Colette Sciberras (2010). Buddhist Philosophy and the Ideals of Environmentalism. Dissertation, Durham University
    I examine the consistency between contemporary environmentalist ideals and Buddhist philosophy, focusing, first, on the problem of value in nature. I argue that the teachings found in the Pāli canon cannot easily be reconciled with a belief in the intrinsic value of life, whether human or otherwise. This is because all existence is regarded as inherently unsatisfactory, and all beings are seen as impermanent and insubstantial, while the ultimate spiritual goal is often viewed, in early Buddhism, as involving (...)
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  40.  30
    Toshihiko Izutsu (1977). Toward a Philosophy of Zen Buddhism. Prajñā Press.
    The true man without any rank.--Two dimensions of ego consciousness.--Sense and nonsense in Zen Buddhism.--The philosophical problem of articulation.--Thinking and a-thinking through kōan.--The interior and exterior in Zen.--The elimination of color in Far Eastern art and photography.
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  41.  4
    Douglas L. Berger (2015). Review of Parimal G. Patil, Against a Hindu God: Buddhist Philosophy of Religion in India. [REVIEW] Journal of Buddhist Philosophy 1:235-237.
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  42.  6
    Rick Repetti (2015). Christian Coseru, Perceiving Reality: Consciousness, Intentionality, and Cognition in Buddhist Philosophy. Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 35 (4):191-193.
    This work focuses on a narrow Buddhist epistemological tradition that begins with the Abhidharma philosopher Vasubandhu’s analyses of perception and is developed by Dignāga, Dharmakīrti, Kamalaśīla, and Śāntarakṣita. Coseru explains how Buddhist epistemology evolved in dialogue with competing conceptions internal to Buddhism and against orthodox Indian philosophies, particularly Nyāya and Mīmāṃsā. Coseru’s main argument is that although widespread interpretations of Buddhist epistemology are foundationalist, a more useful way to understand it is as a form of phenomenology consistent (...)
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  43.  8
    Fumihiko Sueki (2008). Buddhist Philosophy of the Dead. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 6:259-265.
    Japanese Buddhism is sometimes called “funeral Buddhism” contemptuously. Buddhism is often criticized in that it serves only the dead and does not useful for the living. In truth, the main duties of Buddhist monks are to perform funeral services, maintain graves and perform memorial services for the dead in Japan today. Modern Buddhist leaders in Japan tried to argue against such criticism and insisted that Buddhism in origin was not a religion for the dead but for the living. (...)
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  44.  3
    L. Bishwanath Sharma (2008). Understanding Buddhist Philosophy. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 6:237-250.
    The Buddhism has been developed as a philosophical system along with the Brhamanic tradition to maintain a complete and distinct identity of its own thought after Buddha. This paper attempts to understand the basic philosophical foundation of Buddhism. It believes that the Four Noble Truths (ārya-satya) are the original teachings of the Buddha which contained philosophical insights and thoughts like its doctrine of pratītya-samutpāda. It also presumes that the very existence itself produces the whole human predicaments in the form of (...)
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  45.  1
    L. Bishwanath Sharma (2008). Understanding Buddhist Philosophy. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 6:237-250.
    The Buddhism has been developed as a philosophical system along with the Brhamanic tradition to maintain a complete and distinct identity of its own thought after Buddha. This paper attempts to understand the basic philosophical foundation of Buddhism. It believes that the Four Noble Truths (ārya-satya) are the original teachings of the Buddha which contained philosophical insights and thoughts like its doctrine of pratītya-samutpāda. It also presumes that the very existence itself produces the whole human predicaments in the form of (...)
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  46. Christian Coseru (forthcoming). Buddhist ‘Foundationalism’ and the Phenomenology of Perception,” Philosophy East and West 59:4 (October 2009): 409-439. [REVIEW] Philosophy East and West.
    In this essay, which draws on a set of interrelated issues in the phenomenology of perception, I call into question the assumption that Buddhist philosophers of the Dignāga-Dharmakīrti tradition pursue a kind of epistemic foundationalism. I argue that the embodied cognition paradigm, which informs recent efforts within the Western philosophical tradition to overcome the Cartesian legacy, can be also found– albeit in a modified form–in the Buddhist epistemological tradition. In seeking to ground epistemology in the phenomenology of cognition, (...)
     
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  47.  42
    Daniel Anderson Arnold (2012). Brains, Buddhas, and Believing: The Problem of Intentionality in Classical Buddhist and Cognitive-Scientific Philosophy of Mind. Columbia University Press.
    Aiming to complicate this story, Dan Arnold confronts a significant obstacle to popular attempts at harmonizing classical Buddhist and modern scientific thought: since most Indian Buddhists believe that the mental continuum is uninterrupted ..
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  48.  36
    Lajos L. Brons (2016). Engaging Buddhism: Why It Matters to Philosophy, by Jay L. Garfield. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 94 (2):415-415.
  49.  18
    T. R. V. Murti (1980). The Central Philosophy of Buddhism: A Study of the Mādhyamika System. Unwin Paperbacks.
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  50.  2
    Amy Donahue (2016). For the Cowherds: Coloniality and Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy. Philosophy East and West 66 (2):597-617.
    Comparative philosophers have noted that some comparative methods perpetuate colonial legacies. What follows employs aspects of the scholarship of Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Anîbal Quijano, and María Lugones to identify one colonially problematic methodology that some well-regarded contemporary comparative representations of “Buddhist Philosophy” arguably adopt. In 1995, Lin Tongqi, Henry Rosemont, Jr., and Roger Ames identified “the most fundamental methodological issue facing all comparativists” by raising and responding to the question: “Does the imposition of modern Western conceptual categories on (...)
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