Search results for 'Buddhist precepts' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Donnapat Jaiwong & Vanchai Ariyabuddhiphongs (2010). Observance of the Buddhist Five Precepts, Subjective Wealth, and Happiness Among Buddhists in Bangkok, Thailand. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 32 (3):327-344.score: 168.0
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  2. Vanchai Ariyabuddhiphongs & Donnapat Jaiwong (2010). Observance of the Buddhist Five Precepts, Subjective Wealth, and Happiness Among Buddhists in Bangkok, Thailand. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 32 (3):327-344.score: 168.0
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  3. Vanchai Ariyabuddhiphongs & Saowanee Buaphoon (2013). Mother-Daughter Relationships and an Attitude Against Premarital Sex: The Mediating Effect of Buddhist Five Precepts. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 35 (2):193-212.score: 168.0
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  4. Vanchai Ariyabuddhiphongs & Chanchira Hongladarom (2011). Violation of Buddhist Five Precepts, Money Consciousness, and the Tendency to Pay Bribes Among Organizational Employees in Bangkok, Thailand. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 33 (3):325-344.score: 168.0
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  5. Sung-Hyun Shin (2003). The Universal Aspects of Korean Buddhist Precepts. In S. R. Bhatt (ed.), Buddhist Thought and Culture in India and Korea. Indian Council of Philosophical Research. 129.score: 156.0
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  6. Jacquetta Gomes (2004). The Development and Use of the Eight Precepts for Lay Practitioners, Upāsakas and Upāsikās in Theravāda Buddhism in the West. Contemporary Buddhism 5 (1):47-63.score: 150.0
    (2004). The development and use of the eight precepts for lay practitioners, Upāsakas and Upāsikās in Theravāda Buddhism in the West. Contemporary Buddhism: Vol. 5, No. 1, pp. 47-63.
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  7. Robert Aitken (1984). The Mind of Clover: Essays in Zen Buddhist Ethics. North Point Press.score: 96.0
    In Taking the Path of Zen , Robert Aitken provided a concise guide to zazen (Zen meditation) and other aspects of the practice of Zen. In The Mind of Clover he addresses the world beyond the zazen cushions, illuminating issues of appropriate personal and social action through an exploration of the philosophical complexities of Zen ethics. Aitken's approach is clear and sure as he shows how our minds can be as nurturing as clover, which enriches the soil and benefits the (...)
     
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  8. S. Tachibana (1992/1975). The Ethics of Buddhism. Curzon Press.score: 90.0
    This is the 'Middle Way', with eight qualities or virtues - understanding, thought, speech, action, livelihood, effort, mindfulness and concentration - that ...
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  9. Mark T. Unno (1999). Questions in the Making: A Review Essay on Zen Buddhist Ethics in the Context of Buddhist and Comparative Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 27 (3):507 - 536.score: 84.0
    In reviewing four works from the 1990s-monographs by Christopher Ives and Phillip Olson on Zen Buddhist ethics, Damien Keown's treatment of Indian Buddhist ethics, and an edited collection on Buddhism and human rights-this article examines recent scholarship on Zen Buddhist ethics in light of issues in Buddhist and comparative ethics. It highlights selected themes in the notional and real encounter of Zen Buddhism with Western thought and culture as presented in the reviewed works and identifies issues (...)
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  10. Vanchai Ariyabuddhiphongs (2009). Buddhist Belief in Merit (Punña), Buddhist Religiousness and Life Satisfaction Among Thai Buddhists in Bangkok, Thailand. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 31 (2):191-213.score: 78.0
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  11. Xingyun (1998). Being Good: Buddhist Ethics for Everyday Life. Weatherhill.score: 72.0
    The aim of this book is simple: to invite readers to consider what it means to lead a good life, and to offer practical advice, based on the Buddhist teachings, as to how this can be accomplished. In each of more than thirty brief essays, Master Hsing Yun treats a specific moral or ethical issue, using quotations from the rich treasury of the Buddhist scriptures as a point of departure for his discussion. Among the topics he considers are (...)
     
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  12. Zaixuan Chen (2007). Chan Wai Liu Yun. Zong Jiao Wen Hua Chu Ban She.score: 60.0
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  13. David Scott (1995). Buddhist Functionalism—Instrumentality Reaffirmed. Asian Philosophy 5 (2):127 – 149.score: 54.0
    Abstract This article seeks to determine if Buddhism can best be understood as primarily a functionalist tradition. In pursuing this, some analogies arise with various Western strands?particularly James? ?pragmatism?, Dewey's ?instrumentalism?, Braithwaite's ?empiricism?, Wittgenstein's ?language games?, and process thinkers like Hartshorne and Jacobson. Within the Buddhist setting, the traditional Therav?da framework of sila (ethics/precepts), sam?dhi (meditation) and pañña (wisdom) are examined, together with Therav?da rituals. Despite some ?correspondence? approaches with regard to truth claim statements, e.g. vipassan? ?insight? and (...)
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  14. John Magnus Michelsen (1995). The Place of Buddhism in Santayana's Moral Philosophy. Asian Philosophy 5 (1):39 – 46.score: 54.0
    Abstract Within the moral philosophy of the Spanish?American philosopher George San?tayana (1863?1952), reference to Buddhism becomes an essential feature in his formulation of the notion of post?rational morality, which is that ?phase? of morality which involves an effort to subordinate all precepts to one that points to some single eventual good. Post?rational morality is synonymous with the spiritual life, an essential feature of which is detachment; and this is why the Buddhists can be said to be the ?true masters? (...)
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  15. Arvind Sharma & William A. Barbieri Jr (1999). Letters, Notes, and Comments. Journal of Religious Ethics 27 (3):539-549.score: 48.0
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  16. Nhất Hạnh (2012). Good Citizens: Creating Enlightened Society. Parallax Press.score: 48.0
     
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  17. Harry Lee Wells (2005). Transformation of Hearts and Minds: Chan Zen--Catholic Approaches to Precepts. Buddhist-Christian Studies 25 (1):155-156.score: 36.0
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  18. Lily De Silva (1991). The Scope and Contemporary Significance of the Five Precepts. In Charles Wei-Hsun Fu & Sandra A. Wawrytko (eds.), Buddhist Ethics and Modern Society: An International Symposium. Greenwood Press.score: 36.0
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  19. Christian Thomas Kohl (2008). Buddhism and Quantum Physics. Indian International Journal of Buddhist Studies 9 (2008):45-62.score: 27.0
    Abstract. Rudyard Kipling, the famous english author of « The Jungle Book », born in India, wrote one day these words: « Oh, East is East and West is West, and never the twain shall meet ». In my paper I show that Kipling was not completely right. I try to show the common ground between buddhist philosophy and quantum physics. There is a surprising parallelism between the philosophical concept of reality articulated by Nagarjuna and the physical concept of (...)
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  20. Christian Coseru (2013). Reason and Experience in Buddhist Epistemology. In Steven Emmanuel (ed.), A Companion to Buddhist Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 27.0
    As a specific domain of inquiry, “Buddhist epistemology” (sometimes designated in the specialist literature by the Sanskrit neologism pramāṇavāda, or the “theory of reliable sources of knowledge”) stands primarily for the dialogical-disputational context in which Buddhists advance their empirical claims to knowledge and articulate the principles of reason on the basis of which such claims may be defended. The main questions pursued in this article concern the tension between the notion that knowledge is ultimately a matter of direct experience---which (...)
     
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  21. James Giles (1993). The No-Self Theory: Hume, Buddhism, and Personal Identity. Philosophy East and West 43 (2):175-200.score: 24.0
    The problem of personal identity is often said to be one of accounting for what it is that gives persons their identity over time. However, once the problem has been construed in these terms, it is plain that too much has already been assumed. For what has been assumed is just that persons do have an identity. A new interpretation of Hume's no-self theory is put forward by arguing for an eliminative rather than a reductive view of personal identity, and (...)
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  22. Peter Harvey & Mark Siderits (2004). An Introduction to Buddhist Ethics: Foundations, Values and Issues. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (3):405–409.score: 24.0
    This systematic introduction to Buddhist ethics is aimed at anyone interested in Buddhism, including students, scholars and general readers. Peter Harvey is the author of the acclaimed Introduction to Buddhism (Cambridge, 1990), and his new book is written in a clear style, assuming no prior knowledge. At the same time it develops a careful, probing analysis of the nature and practical dynamics of Buddhist ethics in both its unifying themes and in the particularities of different Buddhist traditions. (...)
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  23. Matthew MacKenzie (2010). Enacting the Self: Buddhist and Enactivist Approaches to the Emergence of the Self. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (1):75-99.score: 24.0
    In this paper, I take up the problem of the self through bringing together the insights, while correcting some of the shortcomings, of Indo–Tibetan Buddhist and enactivist accounts of the self. I begin with an examination of the Buddhist theory of non-self ( anātman ) and the rigorously reductionist interpretation of this doctrine developed by the Abhidharma school of Buddhism. After discussing some of the fundamental problems for Buddhist reductionism, I turn to the enactive approach to philosophy (...)
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  24. Michael Kurak (2003). The Relevance of the Buddhist Theory of Dependent Co-Origination to Cognitive Science. Brain and Mind 4 (3):341-351.score: 24.0
    The canonical Buddhist account of the cognitive processes underlying our experience of the world prefigures recent developments in neuroscience. The developments in question are centered on two main trends in neuroscience research and thinking. The first of these involves the idea that our everyday experience of ourselves and of the world consists in a series of discrete microstates. The second closely related notion is that affective structures and systems play critical roles in governing the formation of such states. Both (...)
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  25. Jay L. Garfield (2002). Empty Words: Buddhist Philosophy and Cross-Cultural Interpretation. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    This volume collects Jay Garfield's essays on Madhyamaka, Yogacara, Buddhist ethics and cross-cultural hermeneutics. The first part addresses Madhyamaka, supplementing Garfield's translation of Fundamental Wisdom of the Middle Way (OUP, 1995), a foundational philosophical text by the Buddhist saint Nagarjuna. Garfield then considers the work of philosophical rivals, and sheds important light on the relation of Nagarjuna's views to other Buddhist and non-Buddhist philosophical positions.
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  26. Mark Siderits (2008). Paleo-Compatibilism and Buddhist Reductionism. Sophia 47 (1):29-42.score: 24.0
    Paleo-compatibilism is the view that the freedom required for moral responsibility is not incompatible with determinism about the factors relevant to moral assessment, since the claim that we are free and the claim that the psychophysical elements are causally determined are true in distinct and incommensurable ways. This is to be accounted for by appealing to the distinction between conventional truth and ultimate truth developed by Buddhist Reductionists. Paleo-compatibilists hold that the illusion of incompatibilism only arises when we illegitimately (...)
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  27. S. R. Bhatt (2000). Buddhist Epistemology. Greenwood Press.score: 24.0
    This volume provides a clear and exhaustive exposition of Buddhist epistemology and logic, based on the works of classical thinkers such as Vasubandhu, Dinnaga, ...
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  28. Padmasiri De Silva (1998). Environmental Philosophy and Ethics in Buddhism. St. Martin's Press.score: 24.0
    This work introduces the reader to the central issues and theories in Western environmental ethics, and against this background develops a Buddhist environmental philosophy and ethics. Drawing material from original sources, there is a lucid exposition of Buddhist environmentalism, its ethics, economics and Buddhist perspectives for environmental education. The work is focused on a diagnosis of the contemporary environmental crisis and a Buddhist contribution for positive solutions. Replete with stories and illustrations from original Buddhist sources, (...)
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  29. William Edelglass & Jay L. Garfield (eds.) (2009). Buddhist Philosophy: Essential Readings. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    This volume is an ideal single text for an intermediate or advanced course in Buddhist philosophy, and makes this tradition immediately accessible to the ...
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  30. Robert M. Ellis (2011). The Trouble with Buddhism. Lulu.com.score: 24.0
    This book is a philosophical critique of the Buddhist tradition (not a scholarly work about the Buddhist tradition), applying the standards of judgement developed in 'A Theory of Moral Objectivity'. It is argued that although the Buddhist tradition provides access to the insights of the Middle Way, many other aspects of Buddhist tradition are inconsistent with this central insight. The sources of justified belief in Buddhism, karma, conditionality, concepts of reality, monasticism and Buddhist ethics are (...)
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  31. Gregory Schopen (2010). On Incompetent Monks and Able Urbane Nuns in a Buddhist Monastic Code. Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (2):107-131.score: 24.0
    Most modern scholars seem to assume that Buddhist monks in early India had a good knowledge of Buddhist doctrine and at least of basic Buddhist texts. But the compilers of the vinayas or monastic codes seem not to have shared this assumption. The examples presented here are drawn primarily from one vinaya , and show that the compilers put in place a whole series of rules to deal with situations in which monks were startlingly ignorant of both (...)
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  32. H. Saddhatissa (1997). Buddhist Ethics. Wisdom.score: 24.0
    Analyzes, examines, and explains ethical concepts from a primarily Buddhist point of view.
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  33. Noa Ronkin (2005). Early Buddhist Metaphysics: The Making of a Philosophical Tradition. London ; New Yorkroutledgecurzon.score: 24.0
    Early Buddhist Metaphysics provides a philosophical account of the major doctrinal shift in the history of early Theravada tradition in India: the transition from the earliest stratum of Buddhist thought to the systematic and allegedly scholastic philosophy of the Pali Abhidhamma movement. Entwining comparative philosophy and Buddhology, the author probes the Abhidhamma's metaphysical transition in terms of the Aristotelian tradition and vis-à-vis modern philosophy, exploits Western philosophical literature from Plato to contemporary texts in the fields of philosophy of (...)
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  34. Alex Wayman (1999). A Millennium of Buddhist Logic. Motilal Banarsidass Publishers.score: 24.0
    This is volume One of texts (from sanskrit and Tibetan sources) of the two planned volumes on Buddhist Ligic (the second volume to be on topics and opponents).
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  35. Charles Goodman (2009). Consequences of Compassion: An Interpretation and Defense of Buddhist Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Fundamental Buddhist teachings -- Main features of some western ethical theories -- Teravāda ethics as rule-consequentialism -- Mahāyāna ethics before Śāntideva and after -- Transcending ethics -- Buddhist ethics and the demands of consequentialism -- Buddhism on moral responsibility -- Punishment -- Objections and replies -- A Buddhist response to Kant.
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  36. David Webster (2005). The Philosophy of Desire in the Buddhist Pali Canon. Routledgecurzon.score: 24.0
    David Webster explores the notion of desire as found in the Buddhist Pali Canon. Beginning by addressing the idea of a 'paradox of desire', whereby we must desire to end desire, the varieties of desire that are articulated in the Pali texts are examined. A range of views of desire, as found in Western thought are presented as well as Hindu and Jain approaches. An exploration of the concept of ditthi (view or opinion) is also provided, exploring the way (...)
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  37. Robert G. Morrison (1997). Nietzsche and Buddhism: A Study in Nihilism and Ironic Affinities. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Morrison offers an illuminating study of two linked traditions that have figured prominently in twentieth-century thought: Buddhism and the philosophy of Nietzsche. Nietzsche admired Buddhism, but saw it as a dangerously nihilistic religion; he forged his own affirmative philosophy in reaction against the nihilism that he feared would overwhelm Europe. Morrison shows that Nietzsche's influential view of Buddhism was mistaken, and that far from being nihilistic, it has notable and perhaps surprising affinities with Nietzsche's own project of the transvaluation of (...)
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  38. Pragati Sahni (2008). Environmental Ethics in Buddhism: A Virtues Approach. Routledge.score: 24.0
    This work gives an innovative approach to the subject, which puts forward a distinctly Buddhist environmental ethics that is in harmony with traditional ...
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  39. Shayne Clarke (2009). Locating Humour in Indian Buddhist Monastic Law Codes: A Comparative Approach. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 37 (4):311-330.score: 24.0
    It has been claimed that Indian Buddhism, as opposed to East Asian Chan/Zen traditions, was somehow against humour. In this paper I contend that humour is discernible in canonical Indian Buddhist texts, particularly in Indian Buddhist monastic law codes (Vinaya). I will attempt to establish that what we find in these texts sometimes is not only humourous but that it is intentionally so. I approach this topic by comparing different versions of the same narratives preserved in Indian (...) monastic law codes. (shrink)
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  40. Adrian Konik (2009). Buddhism and Transgression: The Appropriation of Buddhism in the Contemporary West. Brill.score: 24.0
    Through doing so, this book radically re-conceptualizes the role of Buddhism in the world today by linking Buddhist practice with acts of discursive ...
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  41. Maria Heim (2011). Buddhist Ethics: A Review Essay. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (3):571-584.score: 24.0
    I argue that three recent studies (Imagining the Life Course, by Nancy Eberhardt; Sensory Biographies, by Robert Desjarlais; and How to Behave, by Anne Hansen) advance the field of Buddhist Ethics in the direction of the empirical study of morality. I situate their work within a larger context of moral anthropology, that is, the study of human nature in its limits and capacities for moral agency. Each of these books offers a finely grained account of particular and local (...) ways of interpreting human life and morality, and each explores complex conceptions of moral agency. I suggest that these three studies share similar interests in moral psychology, the human being across time, the intersubjective dimensions of moral experience, and what life within a karmic framework looks like. I propose that their contributions offer some of the most refreshing and interesting work generated in Buddhist ethics in the last decade. (shrink)
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  42. David Gardiner (2008). Metaphor and Maṇḍala in Shingon Buddhist Theology. Sophia 47 (1):43-55.score: 24.0
    Buddhist maṇḍala that are made of colored sand or are painted on cloth have been well represented in Asian art circles in the West. Discussions of the role that they can play in stimulating religious contemplation or even as sacred icons charged with power have also appeared in English scholarship. The metaphorical meaning of the term maṇḍala, however, is less commonly referenced. This paper discusses how the founder of the Japanese school of Shingon Buddhism, the Buddhist monk Kūkai (...)
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  43. Newman Robert Glass (1995). Working Emptiness: Toward a Third Reading of Emptiness in Buddhism and Postmodern Thought. Scholars Press.score: 24.0
    Newman Robert Glass argues that there are three workings of emptiness capable of grounding thinking and behavior: presence, difference, and essence. The first two readings, exemplified by Heidegger and Mark C. Taylor respectively, present opposing views of the work of emptiness in thinking. The third, essence, presents a position on the work of emptiness in desire and affect. Glass begins by offering a close analysis of presence and difference. He then fashions his own understanding of essence, or emptiness. He goes (...)
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  44. Christian Coseru (2008). A Review of Zen Buddhism and Environmental Ethics. [REVIEW] Sophia 47 (1):75-77.score: 24.0
    Simon P. James' Zen Buddhism and Environmental Ethics offers an engaging, sophisticated, and well-argued defence of the notion that Zen Buddhism has something positive to offer the environmental movement. James' goal is two-fold: first, dispel criticism that Zen (by virtue of its anti-philosophical stance) lacks an ethical program (because it shuns conventional morality), has no concern for the environment at large (because it adopts a thoroughly anthropocentric stance), and deprives living entities of any intrinsic worth (because it operates from the (...)
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  45. Peter Jilks (2008). Review of Mark Siderits, Buddhism as Philosophy. [REVIEW] Sophia 47 (1):79-82.score: 24.0
    Siderits’ book is a welcome contribution to the ongoing dialogue between Buddhism and Western analytic philosophy. It covers the three main areas of philosophical enquiry—metaphysics, ethics and epistemology. Although conceptually quite challenging in places, the information is always presented in a pedagogic, evolutionary and highly readable manner. There are occasional problems with Siderits’ approach of isolating Buddhism as philosophy from Buddhism as religion, particularly in his chapter on ethics, which cannot avoid being somewhat unbalanced, and possibly misrepresentational, as it skirts (...)
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  46. Damien Keown (2005). Buddhist Ethics: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    The latter half of the twentieth century witnessed a growing interest in Buddhism, and it continues to capture the imagination of many in the West who see it as either an alternative or a supplement to their own religious beliefs. Numerous introductory books have appeared in recent years to cater to this growing interest, but almost none devotes attention to the specifically ethical dimensions of the tradition. For various complex cultural and historical reasons, ethics has not received as much attention (...)
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  47. Owen J. Flanagan (2011). The Bodhisattva's Brain: Buddhism Naturalized. Mit Press.score: 24.0
    An Essay in Comparative Neurophilosophy -- Preface -- Introduction: Buddhism Naturalized -- The Bodhisattva's Brain -- The Colour of Happiness -- Buddhist Epistemology and Science -- Buddhism as a Natural Philosophy. Buddhist Persons -- Being No-self & Being Nice -- Virtue & Happiness -- Postscript: Cosmopolitanism and Comparative Philosophy.
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  48. Stephen J. Laumakis (2008). An Introduction to Buddhist Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    In this clearly written undergraduate textbook, Stephen Laumakis explains the origin and development of Buddhist ideas and concepts, focusing on the philosophical ideas and arguments presented and defended by selected thinkers and sutras from various traditions. He starts with a sketch of the Buddha and the Dharma, and highlights the origins of Buddhism in India. He then considers specific details of the Dharma with special attention to Buddhist metaphysics and epistemology, and examines the development of Buddhism in China, (...)
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