Search results for 'Business Judaism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Elliot N. Dorff (1997). Judaism, Business and Privacy. Business Ethics Quarterly 7 (2):31-44.score: 150.0
    This article first describes some of the chief contrasts between Judaism and American secularism in their underlying convictions about the business environment and the expectations which all involved in business can have of each other—namely, duties vs. rights,communitarianism vs. individualism, and ties to God and to the environment based on our inherent status as God’s creatures rather than on our pragmatic choice. Conservative Judaism’s methodology for plumbing the Jewish tradition for guidance is described and contrasted to (...)
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  2. Abbas J. Ali, Robert C. Camp & Manton Gibbs (2005). The Concept of “Free Agency” in Monotheistic Religions: Implications for Global Business. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 60 (1):103 - 112.score: 72.0
    The current debate on “free agency” seems to highlight the romantic aspects of free agent and considers it a genuine response to changing economic conditions (e.g., high-unemployment rate, importance of knowledge in the labor market, the eclipse of organizational loyalty, and self pride). Little attention, if any, has been given to the religious root of the free agency concept and its persistent existence across history. In this paper, the current discourse on free agency and the conditions that have led to (...)
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  3. Jacques Cory (2005). Activist Business Ethics. Springer.score: 66.0
    This book asks the question, how could we convince or compel modern business to apply ethical standards and is it essential to the success of economy? In order to answer the question, this book examines the evolution of the activist business ethics in business, in democracies, Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, in philosophy, psychology and psychoanalysis. The book examines international aspects, the personification of stakeholders, the predominance of values and ethics for CEOs and the inefficient safeguards of (...)
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  4. Moses L. Pava (1998). The Substance of Jewish Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 17 (6):149-163.score: 60.0
    Philosophers generally agree that meaningful ethical statements are universal in scope. If so, what sense is there to speak about a business ethics particular to Judaism? Just as a Jewish algebra and a Jewish physics are contradictions in terms, so too, is the notion of a particularly Jewish business ethics. The goal of this paper is to deny the above assertion and to explore the potentially unique characteristic of a Jewish business ethics. Ethics, in the final (...)
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  5. Mitchell Langbert & Donald Grunewald (2004). The Real Estate Investor. Journal of Business Ethics 51 (1):91-99.score: 60.0
    This case study chronicles the entrepreneurial and real estate investment activities of a recent Ph.D. graduate in business administration. The protagonist learns that clear focus is necessary for entrepreneurial success and that trust does not mix with entrepreneurship and negotiation. Ethics are sometimes problematic for entrepreneurs.
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  6. Moses L. Pava (1998). Developing a Religiously Grounded Business Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (1):65-83.score: 60.0
    The specific purpose of this introductory paper is to explicitly introduce readers to some of the important Biblical, Talmudic, andpost-Talmudic texts which deal with business ethics. As the discussion will show, Judaism’s traditional texts treat an amazing variety of issues emphasizing responsibilities in the business context. These texts are both legalistic and aspirational in character. The theme of this study is that an authentic Jewish business ethics needs to grow out of an understanding of the needs (...)
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  7. Shalom Arush (2007). Sefer Be-Gan Ha-Osher: Madrikh Maʻaśi la-ʻashir Ha-Amiti. Mosdot "Ḥuṭ Shel Ḥesed".score: 60.0
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  8. Shalom Arush (2010). The Garden of Riches: A Practical Guide to Financial Success. Chut Shel Chessed.score: 60.0
     
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  9. Pinḥas Shalom ben Shelomoh Fridman (2004). Sefer Mekhalkel Ḥayim: ʻoseḳ Be-ʻinyene Hishtadlut Ha-Parnasah Ṿe-Khol Ha-Sovev .. Pinḥas Shalom Ben Shelomoh Fridman.score: 60.0
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  10. Efrayim Yaʻaḳov ben Mikhaʼ Lipsḳi & el (2009). Bi-Shevil She-Titʻasher: Hanhagot, Beʼurim, ʻiyunim U-Tefilot le-Farnasah Ṭovah. Efrayim Yaʻaḳov Lipsḳi.score: 60.0
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  11. Efrayim Yaʻaḳov ben Mikhaʼel Lipsḳi (2009). Bi-Shevil She-Titʻasher: Hanhagot, Beʼurim, ʻiyunim U-Tefilot le-Farnasah Ṭovah. Efrayim Yaʻaḳov Lipsḳi.score: 60.0
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  12. Nicholas Capaldi (ed.) (2005). Business and Religion: A Clash of Civilizations? M & M Scrivener Press.score: 48.0
    The purpose of this volume is to inaugurate a dialogue on the common elements of all three Abrahamic traditions - Christianity, Islam, and Judaism - that touch ...
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  13. Moses L. Pava (2011). Jewish Ethics in a Post-Madoff World: A Case for Optimism. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 48.0
    Machine generated contents note: -- PART 1: Overview * Jewish Ethics in a New Key * Temptations of Tradition * Sacred Compromise * Renewing Jewish Ethics * PART II: On the Ground * Learning to Speak about the Elephant in the Room * The Art of Moral Criticism * Deal Breaker and the Money Laundering Rabbis * Loving the Stranger and the Fall of the Agriprocessors * The Problem with Income and Wealth Inequalities * PART III: Frontiers * "The Exaltation (...)
     
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  14. Mosheh Rozen (ed.) (2008). Mafteaḥ Ha-Parnasah: Divre Hagut, Maḥshavah U-Musar ʻal Ha-Parnasah le-or Divre Ḥazal .. Feldhaim.score: 48.0
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  15. Menachem Mendel Schneerson (2009). Heṿeh Gevir: Ha-Derekh le-Ḥayim Shel ʻashirut. Mekhon Otsrot Menaḥem.score: 48.0
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  16. Joshua Fogel & Hershey H. Friedman (2008). Conflict of Interest and the Talmud. Journal of Business Ethics 78 (1-2):237 - 246.score: 42.0
    A core value of Judaism is leading an ethical life. The Talmud, an authoritative source on Jewish law and tradition, has a number of discussions that deal with honesty in business and decision-making. One motive that can cause individuals to be unscrupulous is the presence of a conflict of interest. This paper will define, discuss, and review five Talmudic concepts relevant to conflict of interest. They are (1) Nogea B’Davar (being an interested party), (2) V’hiyitem N’keyim (behaving to (...)
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  17. Nilton Bonder (1996). The Kabbalah of Money: Insights on Livelihood, Business, and All Forms of Economic Behavior. Distributed in the United States by Random House.score: 42.0
    _____This book challenges us to take a broad and ethical view of economic behavior, which includes all forms of exchange and human interaction, from how we spend our money to how we fulfill our role as responsible human beings in a global ecological framework. Drawing on Jewish ethical teachings, mystical lore, and tales of the Hasidic masters, the author examines a wide range of subjects, including competition, partnerships, and contracts, loans and interest, the laws of fair exchange, and tips and (...)
     
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  18. David Vogel (2001). How Green is Judaism? Exploring Jewish Environmental Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 11 (2):349-363.score: 36.0
    This article draws on ancient and medieval Jewish texts to explore the role of the physical environment in Jewish thought. Itsituates Jewish teachings in the context of the debate between anthropocentrism and ecocentrism, discusses the Jewish view ofnature, and reviews various interpretations of an important Biblical precept of environmental ethics. It argues that while Jewish thoughtcontains many "green" elements, it also contains a number of beliefs that challenge some contemporary environmental values.
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  19. Vogel David (2001). How Green is Judaism? Exploring Jewish Environmental Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 11 (2).score: 36.0
     
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  20. Abbas J. Ali, Robert C. Camp & Manton Gibbs (2000). The ten Commandments Perspective on Power and Authority in Organizations. Journal of Business Ethics 26 (4):351 - 361.score: 30.0
    Power and authority in terms of the Ten Commandments (TCs) are discussed. The paper reviews the TCs in Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. The treatment and basis for power and authority in each religion are clarified. Implications of power and authority using the perspective of the TCs are provided. The paper suggests that in today's business environment people tend to be selective in identifying only with certain elements of the TCs that fit their interest and that the TCs should (...)
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  21. Harry J. Van Buren (1999). Acting More Generously Than the Law Requires: The Issue of Employee Layoffs in Halakhah. Journal of Business Ethics 19 (4).score: 30.0
    In this paper, the issue of plant closings is analyzed from the perspective of halakhah (the Written Law of Judaism). Two levels of analysis in halakhah must be differentiated: the legal (enforced by courts) and the moral (not enforced by law, but rather framed in terms of duty to God). There is no legal mandate to keep an unprofitable plant open, but there are a number of moral imprecations (particularly "acting more generously than the law requires") that might influence (...)
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  22. Harry J. Van Buren Iii (1999). Acting More Generously Than the Law Requires: The Issue of Employee Layoffs in Halakhah. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 19 (4):335-343.score: 30.0
    In this paper, the issue of plant closings is analyzed from the perspective of halakhah (the Written Law of Judaism). Two levels of analysis in halakhah must be differentiated: the legal (enforced by courts) and the moral (not enforced by law, but rather framed in terms of duty to God). There is no legal mandate to keep an unprofitable plant open, but there are a number of moral imprecations (particularly "acting more generously than the law requires") that might influence (...)
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  23. Christopher Cosans (2009). Does Milton Friedman Support a Vigorous Business Ethics? Journal of Business Ethics 87 (3):391 - 399.score: 27.0
    This paper explores the level of obligation called for by Milton Friedman’s classic essay “The Social Responsibility of Business is to Increase Profits.” Several scholars have argued that Friedman asserts that businesses have no or minimal social duties beyond compliance with the law. This paper argues that this reading of Friedman does not give adequate weight to some claims that he makes and to their logical extensions. Throughout his article, Friedman emphasizes the values of freedom, respect for law, and (...)
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  24. Gillian Rice (1999). Islamic Ethics and the Implications for Business. Journal of Business Ethics 18 (4):345 - 358.score: 27.0
    As global business operations expand, managers need more knowledge of foreign cultures, in particular, information on the ethics of doing business across borders. The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to share the Islamic perspective on business ethics, little known in the west, which may stimulate further thinking and debate on the relationships between ethics and business, and (2) to provide some knowledge of Islamic philosophy in order to help managers do business in Muslim (...)
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  25. Jason Brennan (2012). For-Profit Business as Civic Virtue. Journal of Business Ethics 106 (3):313-324.score: 27.0
    According to the commonsense view of civic virtue, the places to exercise civic virtue are largely restricted to politics. In this article, I argue for a more expansive view of civic virtue, and argue that one can exercise civic virtue equally well through working for or running a for-profit business. I argue that this conclusion follows from four relatively uncontroversial premises: (1) the consensus definition of “civic virtue”, (2) the standard, most popular theory of virtuous activity, (3) a conception (...)
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  26. Robert C. Solomon (1992). Ethics and Excellence: Cooperation and Integrity in Business. Oxford University Press.score: 27.0
    The Greek philosopher Aristotle, writing over two thousand years before Wall Street, called people who engaged in activities which did not contribute to society "parasites." In his latest work, renowned scholar Robert C. Solomon asserts that though capitalism may require capital, but it does not require, much less should it be defined by the parasites it inevitably attracts. Capitalism has succeeded not with brute strength or because it has made people rich, but because it has produced responsible citizens and--however unevenly--prosperous (...)
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  27. Dag G. Aasland (2004). On the Ethics Behind “Business Ethics”. Journal of Business Ethics 53 (1-2):3-8.score: 27.0
    Ethics in business and economics is often attacked for being too superficial. By elaborating the conclusions of two such critics of business ethics and welfare economics respectively, this article will draw the attention to the ethics behind these apparently well-intended, but not always convincing constructions, by help of the fundamental ethics of Emmanuel Levinas. To Levinas, responsibility is more basic than language, and thus also more basic than all social constructions. Co-operation relations in organizations, markets and value networks (...)
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  28. Göran Svensson & Greg Wood (2008). A Model of Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 77 (3):303 - 322.score: 27.0
    It appears that in the 30 years that business ethics has been a discipline in its own right a model of business ethics has not been proffered. No one appears to have tried to explain the phenomenon known as ‚business ethics’ and the ways that we as a society interact with the concept, therefore, the authors have addressed this gap in the literature by proposing a model of business ethics that the authors hope will stimulate debate. (...)
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  29. Patrick Primeaux & John Stieber (1994). Profit Maximization: The Ethical Mandate of Business. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 13 (4):287 - 294.score: 27.0
    The authors propose a model for business ethics which arises directly from business practice. This model is based on a behavioral definition of the economic theory of profit maximization and situates business ethics within opportunity costs. Within that context, they argue that good business and good ethics are synonymous, that ethics is at the heart and center of business, that profits and ethics are intrinsically related.
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  30. Alexander Bertland (2009). Virtue Ethics in Business and the Capabilities Approach. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (1):25 - 32.score: 27.0
    Recently, Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum have developed the capabilities approach to provide a model for understanding the effectiveness of programs to help the developing nations. The approach holds that human beings are fundamentally free and have a sense of human dignity. Therefore, institutions need to help people enhance this dignity by providing them with the opportunity to develop their capabilities freely. I argue that this approach may help support business ethics based on virtue. Since teleology has become problematic, (...)
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  31. Thomas Maak & Nicola M. Pless (2009). Business Leaders as Citizens of the World. Advancing Humanism on a Global Scale. Journal of Business Ethics 88 (3):537 - 550.score: 27.0
    As the world is getting increasingly connected and interdependent it becomes clear that the world’s most pressing public problems such as poverty or global warming call for cross-sector solutions. The paper discusses the idea of business leaders acting as agents of world benefit, taking an active co-responsibility in generating solutions to problems. It argues that we need responsible global leaders who are aware of the pressing problems in the world, care for the needs of others, aspire to make this (...)
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  32. Patrick E. Murphy (2009). The Relevance of Responsibility to Ethical Business Decisions. Journal of Business Ethics 90 (2):245 - 252.score: 27.0
    This article reviews the concept of moral responsibility in business ethics and examines the seven previous articles using several types of responsibility in business as the overriding construct to gain a fuller understanding of the ethical impact of these articles. The types of responsibility that are used in this analysis are: legal, corporate, managerial, social, stakeholder, and societal. Observations about how normative ethical principles might also be applied to these articles are also advanced. This article concludes with a (...)
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  33. Johannes Brinkmann (2002). Business and Marketing Ethics as Professional Ethics. Concepts, Approaches and Typologies. Journal of Business Ethics 41 (1-2):159 - 177.score: 27.0
    Marketing ethics is normally marketed as a sub-specialization of business ethics. In this paper, marketing ethics serves as an umbrella term for advertising, PR and sales ethics and as an example of professional ethics. To structure the paper, four approaches are distinguished, with a focus on typical professional conflicts, codes, roles or climates respectively. Since the moral climate approachis more inclusive than the other approaches, the last part of the paper deals mainly with moral climates, within the above-mentioned marketing (...)
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  34. Po Keung Ip (2009). The Challenge of Developing a Business Ethics in China. Journal of Business Ethics 88 (1):211 - 224.score: 27.0
    The challenge of developing a business ethics in China in response to today's increasing demands of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is examined within the context of recent business scandals, food scare, labor issues, and environmental degradations the country is now experiencing. Two surveys on CSR are reported. This paper reports the recent CSR development in China and oudines the profile of a prospective business ethics for China. The formal constraints and substantive components of this business ethics (...)
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  35. Pierre-Yves Néron (2010). Business and the Polis: What Does It Mean to See Corporations as Political Actors? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 94 (3):333-352.score: 27.0
    This article addresses the recent call in business ethics literature for a better understanding of corporations as political actors or entities. It first gives an overview of recent attempts to examine classical issues in business ethics through a political lens. It examines different ways in which theorists with an interest in the normative analysis of business practices and institutions could find it desirable and fruitful to use a political lens. This article presents a distinction among four views (...)
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  36. Robert Keith Shaw (2011). The Reformation of Business Education: Purposes and Objectives. In Proceedings of 2011 Conference of the New Zealand Assoication of Applied Business Education. Nelson, New Zealand, 11 October 2011. New Zealand Association of Applied Business Education.score: 27.0
    Business education is at a critical juncture. How are we to justify the curriculum in undergraduate business awards in Aotearoa New Zealand? This essay suggests a philosophical framework for the analysis the business curriculum in Western countries. This framework helps us to see curriculum in a context of global academic communities and national needs. It situates the business degree in the essential tension which modernity (Western metaphysics) creates and which is expressed in an increasingly globalised economy. (...)
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  37. Randi L. Sims & A. Ercan Gegez (2004). Attitudes Towards Business Ethics: A Five Nation Comparative Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 50 (3):253-265.score: 27.0
    Increasingly the business environment is tending toward a global economy. The current study compares the results of the Attitudes Towards Business Ethics Questionnaire (ATBEQ) reported in the literature for samples from the United States of America, Israel, Western Australia, and South Africa to a new sample (n = 125) from Turkey. The results indicate that while there are some shared views towards business ethics across countries, significant differences do exist between Turkey and each of the other countries (...)
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  38. Mohamed M. Ahmed, Kun Young Chung & John W. Eichenseher (2003). Business Students' Perception of Ethics and Moral Judgment: A Cross-Cultural Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 43 (1-2):89 - 102.score: 27.0
    Business relations rely on shared perceptions of what is acceptable/expected norms of behavior. Immense expansion in transnational business made rudimentary consensus on acceptable business practices across cultural boundaries particularly important. Nonetheless, as more and more nations with different cultural and historical experiences interact in the global economy, the potential for misunderstandings based on different expectations is magnified. Such misunderstandings emerge in a growing literature on "improper" business practices – articulated from a narrow cultural perspective. This paper (...)
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  39. William H. Shaw (2009). Marxism, Business Ethics, and Corporate Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (4):565 - 576.score: 27.0
    Originally delivered at a conference of Marxist philosophers in China, this article examines some links, and some tensions, between business ethics and the traditional concerns of Marxism. After discussing the emergence of business ethics as an academic discipline, it explores and attempts to answer two Marxist objections that might be brought against the enterprise of business ethics. The first is that business ethics is impossible because capitalism itself tends to produce greedy, overreaching, and unethical business (...)
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  40. Nader Asgary & Mark C. Mitschow (2002). Toward a Model for International Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 36 (3):239 - 246.score: 27.0
    This paper briefly examines the topic of business ethics and attempts to suggest a code of ethics for multinational firms. While most companies have basic policies on employee integrity, confidentiality and sexual harassment, relatively few have established policies regarding bribery, exploitive child labor, human rights violations and other issues they may encounter in the global market place (Drake, 1998). Until recently, very few companies had truly global operations. Consequently little attention was paid to the issue of ethical guidelines in (...)
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  41. Edward L. Felton & Ronald R. Sims (2005). Teaching Business Ethics: Targeted Outputs. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 60 (4):377 - 391.score: 27.0
    Business ethics is once again a hot topic as examples of improper business practices that violate commonly accepted ethical norms are brought to our attention. With the increasing number of scandals business schools find themselves on the defensive in explaining what they are doing to help respond to the call to teach ‘‘more’’ business ethics. This paper focuses on two issues germane to business ethics teaching efforts: the ‘‘targeted output’’ goals of teaching business ethics (...)
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  42. Alexandre Ardichvili, James A. Mitchell & Douglas Jondle (2009). Characteristics of Ethical Business Cultures. Journal of Business Ethics 85 (4):445 - 451.score: 27.0
    The purpose of this study was to identify general characteristics attributed to ethical business cultures by executives from a variety of industries. Our research identified five clusters of characteristics: Mission- and Values-Driven, Stakeholder Balance, Leadership Effectiveness, Process Integrity, and Long-term Perspective. We propose that these characteristics be used as a foundation of a comprehensive model that can be engaged to influence operational practices in creating and sustaining an ethical business culture.
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  43. Dima Jamali & Ramez Mirshak (2010). Business-Conflict Linkages: Revisiting Mncs, Csr, and Conflict. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 93 (3):443 - 464.score: 27.0
    Heightened interest in business-conflict linkages has materialized with the advent of globalization and the rise of multinational corporations (MNCs). We examine business-conflict linkages in this article both theoretically and empirically. Theoretically, we examine three streams of the relevant academic literature: the academic business and society literature, the practitioner business and society literature, and the international business political behavior literature and argue that there is room and indeed need for their cross fertilization and integration in research (...)
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  44. Edwin R. Micewski & Carmelita Troy (2007). Business Ethics – Deontologically Revisited. Journal of Business Ethics 72 (1):17 - 25.score: 27.0
    In this paper we look at business ethics from a deontological perspective. We address the theory of ethical decision-making and deontological ethics for business executives and explore the concept of “moral duty” as transcending mere gain and profit maximization. Two real-world cases that focus on accounting fraud as the ethical conception. Through these cases, we show that while accounting fraud – from a consequentialist perspective – may appear to provide a quick solution to a pressing problem, longer term (...)
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  45. Christopher Michaelson (2008). Moral Luck and Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 83 (4):773 - 787.score: 27.0
    Moral luck – which seems to appear when circumstances beyond a person’s control influence our moral attributions of praise and blame – is troubling in that modern moral theory has supposed morality to be immune to luck. In business, moral luck commonly influences our moral judgments, many of which have economic consequences that cannot be reversed. The possibility that the chance intervention of luck could influence the way in which we assign moral accountability in business ethics is unsettling. (...)
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  46. Chris J. Moon & Peter Woolliams (2000). Managing Cross Cultural Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 27 (1-2):105 - 115.score: 27.0
    The Trompenaars database (1993) updated with Hampden-Turner (1998) has been assembled to help managers structure their cross cultural experiences in order to develop their competence for doing business and managing across the world. The database comprises more than 50,000 cases from over 100 countries and is one of the world's richest sources of social constructs. Woolliams and Trompenaars (1998) review the analysis undertaken by the authors in the last five years to develop the methodological approach underpinning the work. Recently (...)
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  47. Bettina Palazzo (2002). U.S.-American and German Business Ethics:An Intercultural Comparison. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 41 (3):195 - 216.score: 27.0
    The differences between the "habits of the heart" in German and U.S.-American corporations can be described by analyzing the way corporations deal with norms and values within their organizations. Whereas many U.S. corporations have introduced formal business ethics programs, German companies are very reluctant to address normative questions publicly. This can be explained by the different cultural backgrounds in both countries. By defining these different "habits of the heart" underlying German and American business ethics it is possible to (...)
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  48. Esben Rahbek Pedersen (2010). Modelling Csr: How Managers Understand the Responsibilities of Business Towards Society. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 91 (2):155 - 166.score: 27.0
    The purpose of this article is to develop a model of how managers perceive the responsibilities of business towards society. The article is based on the survey responses of more than 1,000 managers in eight large international firms. It is concluded that the managerial perceptions of societal responsibilities differ in some respects from the mainstream models found in the corporate social responsibility (CSR) and business ethics literature. The article is an output of RESPONSE: an EU- and corporate-funded research (...)
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  49. Ronald F. Duska (1997). The Why's of Business Revisited. Journal of Business Ethics 16 (12-13):1401-1409.score: 27.0
    One can determine the nature of something by asking what it is for. For example one understands what a chair is when one understands it is for sitting on. This involves understanding its purpose. One type of corporation is the for-profit-corporation. This seems to indicate that this type of corporation, the business corporation, has as its purpose to make a profit. Is that as obvious as it first appears? The favorite way for philosophers to arrive at the "purpose" of (...)
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  50. Philipp Schreck (2011). Reviewing the Business Case for Corporate Social Responsibility: New Evidence and Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 103 (2):167-188.score: 27.0
    This study complements previous empirical research on the business case for corporate social responsibility (CSR) by employing hitherto unused data on corporate social performance (CSP) and proposing statistical analyses to account for bi-directional causality between social and financial performance. By allowing for differences in the importance of single components of CSP between industries, the data in this study overcome certain limitations of the databases used in earlier studies. The econometrics employed offer a rigorous way of addressing the problem of (...)
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