Search results for 'Business ethics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Dag G. Aasland (2004). On the Ethics Behind “Business Ethics”. Journal of Business Ethics 53 (1-2):3-8.score: 270.0
    Ethics in business and economics is often attacked for being too superficial. By elaborating the conclusions of two such critics of business ethics and welfare economics respectively, this article will draw the attention to the ethics behind these apparently well-intended, but not always convincing constructions, by help of the fundamental ethics of Emmanuel Levinas. To Levinas, responsibility is more basic than language, and thus also more basic than all social constructions. Co-operation relations in organizations, (...)
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  2. Göran Svensson & Greg Wood (2008). A Model of Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 77 (3):303 - 322.score: 270.0
    It appears that in the 30 years that business ethics has been a discipline in its own right a model of business ethics has not been proffered. No one appears to have tried to explain the phenomenon known as ‚business ethics’ and the ways that we as a society interact with the concept, therefore, the authors have addressed this gap in the literature by proposing a model of business ethics that the authors (...)
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  3. Po Keung Ip (2009). The Challenge of Developing a Business Ethics in China. Journal of Business Ethics 88 (1):211 - 224.score: 270.0
    The challenge of developing a business ethics in China in response to today's increasing demands of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is examined within the context of recent business scandals, food scare, labor issues, and environmental degradations the country is now experiencing. Two surveys on CSR are reported. This paper reports the recent CSR development in China and oudines the profile of a prospective business ethics for China. The formal constraints and substantive components of this (...) ethics are proposed against the background of China's cultural and ideological heritage. (shrink)
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  4. Randi L. Sims & A. Ercan Gegez (2004). Attitudes Towards Business Ethics: A Five Nation Comparative Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 50 (3):253-265.score: 270.0
    Increasingly the business environment is tending toward a global economy. The current study compares the results of the Attitudes Towards Business Ethics Questionnaire (ATBEQ) reported in the literature for samples from the United States of America, Israel, Western Australia, and South Africa to a new sample (n = 125) from Turkey. The results indicate that while there are some shared views towards business ethics across countries, significant differences do exist between Turkey and each of the (...)
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  5. William H. Shaw (2009). Marxism, Business Ethics, and Corporate Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (4):565 - 576.score: 270.0
    Originally delivered at a conference of Marxist philosophers in China, this article examines some links, and some tensions, between business ethics and the traditional concerns of Marxism. After discussing the emergence of business ethics as an academic discipline, it explores and attempts to answer two Marxist objections that might be brought against the enterprise of business ethics. The first is that business ethics is impossible because capitalism itself tends to produce greedy, overreaching, (...)
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  6. Nader Asgary & Mark C. Mitschow (2002). Toward a Model for International Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 36 (3):239 - 246.score: 270.0
    This paper briefly examines the topic of business ethics and attempts to suggest a code of ethics for multinational firms. While most companies have basic policies on employee integrity, confidentiality and sexual harassment, relatively few have established policies regarding bribery, exploitive child labor, human rights violations and other issues they may encounter in the global market place (Drake, 1998). Until recently, very few companies had truly global operations. Consequently little attention was paid to the issue of ethical (...)
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  7. Edward L. Felton & Ronald R. Sims (2005). Teaching Business Ethics: Targeted Outputs. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 60 (4):377 - 391.score: 270.0
    Business ethics is once again a hot topic as examples of improper business practices that violate commonly accepted ethical norms are brought to our attention. With the increasing number of scandals business schools find themselves on the defensive in explaining what they are doing to help respond to the call to teach ‘‘more’’ business ethics. This paper focuses on two issues germane to business ethics teaching efforts: the ‘‘targeted output’’ goals of teaching (...)
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  8. Edwin R. Micewski & Carmelita Troy (2007). Business Ethics – Deontologically Revisited. Journal of Business Ethics 72 (1):17 - 25.score: 270.0
    In this paper we look at business ethics from a deontological perspective. We address the theory of ethical decision-making and deontological ethics for business executives and explore the concept of “moral duty” as transcending mere gain and profit maximization. Two real-world cases that focus on accounting fraud as the ethical conception. Through these cases, we show that while accounting fraud – from a consequentialist perspective – may appear to provide a quick solution to a pressing problem, (...)
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  9. Christopher Michaelson (2008). Moral Luck and Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 83 (4):773 - 787.score: 270.0
    Moral luck – which seems to appear when circumstances beyond a person’s control influence our moral attributions of praise and blame – is troubling in that modern moral theory has supposed morality to be immune to luck. In business, moral luck commonly influences our moral judgments, many of which have economic consequences that cannot be reversed. The possibility that the chance intervention of luck could influence the way in which we assign moral accountability in business ethics is (...)
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  10. Chris J. Moon & Peter Woolliams (2000). Managing Cross Cultural Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 27 (1-2):105 - 115.score: 270.0
    The Trompenaars database (1993) updated with Hampden-Turner (1998) has been assembled to help managers structure their cross cultural experiences in order to develop their competence for doing business and managing across the world. The database comprises more than 50,000 cases from over 100 countries and is one of the world's richest sources of social constructs. Woolliams and Trompenaars (1998) review the analysis undertaken by the authors in the last five years to develop the methodological approach underpinning the work. Recently (...)
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  11. Bettina Palazzo (2002). U.S.-American and German Business Ethics:An Intercultural Comparison. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 41 (3):195 - 216.score: 270.0
    The differences between the "habits of the heart" in German and U.S.-American corporations can be described by analyzing the way corporations deal with norms and values within their organizations. Whereas many U.S. corporations have introduced formal business ethics programs, German companies are very reluctant to address normative questions publicly. This can be explained by the different cultural backgrounds in both countries. By defining these different "habits of the heart" underlying German and American business ethics it is (...)
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  12. Kit-Chun Joanna Lam (2003). Confucian Business Ethics and the Economy. Journal of Business Ethics 43 (1-2):153-162.score: 270.0
    Confucian ethics as applied to the study of business ethics often relate to the micro consideration of personal ethics and the character of a virtuous person. Actually, Confucius and his school have much to say about the morals of the public administration and the market institutions in a more macro level. While Weber emphasizes the role of culture on the development of the economy, and Marx the determining influence of the material base on ideology, we see (...)
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  13. Xiaohe Lu (2010). Business Ethics and Karl Marx's Theory of Capital – Reflections on Making Use of Capital for Developing China's Socialist Market Economy. Journal of Business Ethics 91 (1):95 - 111.score: 270.0
    Making use of capital to develop China’s socialist market economy requires China not only to fully recognize the tendency of capital civilization but also to realize its intrinsic limitations and to seek conditions and a path for overcoming contradictions in the mode of capitalist production. Karl Marx’s theory of capital provides us with a key to understanding and dealing properly with problems of capital. At the same time we should also pay heed to Western research on, experience with, and lessons (...)
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  14. Ronald R. Sims & Edward L. Felton (2006). Designing and Delivering Business Ethics Teaching and Learning. Journal of Business Ethics 63 (3):297 - 312.score: 270.0
    The recent corporate scandals in the United States have caused a renewed interest and focus on teaching business ethics. Business schools and their faculties are reexamining the teaching of business ethics and are reassessing their responsibilities to produce honest and truthful managers who live lives of integrity and ethical accountability. The authors recognize that no agreement exists among business schools and their faculties regarding what should be the content and pedagogy of a course in (...)
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  15. Patricia Doyle Corner (2009). Workplace Spirituality and Business Ethics: Insights From an Eastern Spiritual Tradition. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (3):377 - 389.score: 270.0
    The author extends theory on the relationship between workplace spirituality and business ethics by integrating the "yamas" from yoga, a venerable Eastern spiritual tradition, with existing literature. The yamas are five practices for harmonizing and deepening social connections that can be applied in the workplace. A theoretical framework is developed and two sets of propositions are forwarded. One set emanates from the yamas and another one conjectures relationships between spirituality and business ethics surfaced by the application (...)
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  16. David Kim, Dan Fisher & David McCalman (2009). Modernism, Christianity, and Business Ethics: A Worldview Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 90 (1):115 - 121.score: 270.0
    Despite growing interest in examining the role of religion in business ethics, there is little consensus concerning the basis or standards of “good” or ethical behavior and the reasons behind them. This limits our ability to enhance ethical behavior in the workplace. We address this issue by examining worldviews as it relates to ethics research and practice. Our worldview forms the context within which we organize and build our understanding of reality. Given that much of our academic (...)
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  17. Gary Kok Yew chan (2008). The Relevance and Value of Confucianism in Contemporary Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 77 (3):347 - 360.score: 270.0
    This article examines the relevance and value of Confucian Ethics to contemporary Business Ethics by comparing their respective perspectives and approaches towards business activities within the modern capitalist framework, the principle of reciprocity and the concept of human virtues. Confucian Ethics provides interesting parallels with contemporary Western-oriented Business Ethics. At the same, it diverges from contemporary Business Ethics in some significant ways. Upon an examination of philosophical texts as well as empirical (...)
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  18. Alma Acevedo (2012). Personalist Business Ethics and Humanistic Management: Insights From Jacques Maritain. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 105 (2):197-219.score: 270.0
    The integration of personalism into business ethics has been recently studied. Research has also been conducted on humanistic management approaches. The conceptual relationship between personalism and humanism , however, has not been fully addressed. This article furthers that research by arguing that a true humanistic management is personalistic. Moreover, it claims that personalism is promising as a sound philosophical foundation for business ethics. Insights from Jacques Maritain’s work are discussed in support of these conclusions. Of particular (...)
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  19. Ian Phau & Garick Kea (2007). Attitudes of University Students Toward Business Ethics: A Cross-National Investigation of Australia, Singapore and Hong Kong. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 72 (1):61 - 75.score: 270.0
    With the current globalisation and complexity of today’s business environment, there are increasing concerns on the role of business ethics. Using culture and religion as the determinants, this paper presents a cross-national study of attitudes toward business ethics among three countries: Australia, Singapore and Hong Kong. The results of this paper have shown the attitudes toward business ethics to be significantly different among the three countries. It was also found that respondents who practised (...)
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  20. Kipton E. Jensen (2009). Shadow of Virtue: On a Painful If Not Principled Compromise Inherent in Business Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (1):99 - 107.score: 270.0
    From a certain philosophical perspective, one that is at least as old as Plato but which is addressed also by Aristotle and Kant, business ethics – to the extent that it is marketed as form of enlightened self-interest — constitutes a Thrasymachean compromise: to argue that it is to our advantage to conduct business ethically, perhaps even advantageous to the bottom-line, comes curiously close to endorsing what Plato called the 'shadow of virtue' — i.e., of becoming temperate (...)
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  21. Zhenzhong Ma (2009). The Status of Contemporary Business Ethics Research: Present and Future. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 90 (3):255 - 265.score: 270.0
    This study provides a general overview of contemporary business ethics research of the last 10 years (1997-2006) and discusses potential future research directions in business ethics based on the overview. Using citation and co-citation analysis, this study examined the citation data of journal articles, books, and other publications collected in the Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI), wherein key research themes in business ethics studies in 1997—2006 and correlations between these themes were explored. The results (...)
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  22. Ingo Pies, Markus Beckmann & Stefan Hielscher (2010). Value Creation, Management Competencies, and Global Corporate Citizenship: An Ordonomic Approach to Business Ethics in the Age of Globalization. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 94 (2):265 - 278.score: 270.0
    This article develops an "ordonomic" approach to business ethics in the age of globalization. Through the use of a three-tiered conceptual framework that distinguishes between the basic game of antagonistic social cooperation, the meta game of rule-setting, and the meta-meta game of rule-finding discourse, we address three questions, the answers to which we believe are crucial to fostering effective business leadership and corporate social responsibility. First, the purpose of business in society is value creation. Companies have (...)
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  23. J. Poesche (2002). Agile Manufacturing Strategy and Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 38 (4):307 - 326.score: 270.0
    Evolving manufacturing management strategies pose changing business ethical challenges to the companies and society. The evolution is not one that continuously improves the business ethical performance, some aspects improve it and some other are detrimental. This paper explores the business ethical implications of the evolution of manufacturing management starting at the pre-industrial workshops until the introduction of agile manufacturing based on business ethical criteria drawn from business ethics (applied moral theory) and environmental law.
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  24. Will Drover, Jennifer Franczak & Richard F. Beltramini (2012). A 30-Year Historical Examination of Ethical Concerns Regarding Business Ethics: Who's Concerned? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 111 (4):431-438.score: 270.0
    Understanding the ethical attitudes and concerns of future business leaders has been the focus of increasing research attention. Largely, this is due to the influence of such perspectives, as it is these presently held ideologies that ultimately translate into the actions and behaviors of the forthcoming workforce. This research examines how such business-related ethicality perspectives have evolved by administering a nationwide survey that builds on two Journal of Business Ethics studies, Beltramini et al. (J Bus (...) 3:195–200, 1984 ) and Peterson et al. (J Bus Ethics 10:733–738, 1991 ), resulting in the latest segment of a three-decade historical perspective of ethical concerns. Our findings indicate fundamental shifts regarding the nature of concerns, and provide a number of practical and theoretical contributions to the ethics literature, bringing us one step closer to more comprehensively understanding, and ultimately enhancing ethical practices in business. (shrink)
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  25. William Kline (2006). Business Ethics From the Internal Point of View. Journal of Business Ethics 64 (1):57 - 67.score: 270.0
    The notion that the firm, and economic activity in general, is inherently amoral is a central feature of positive economics that is also widely accepted in business ethics. Theories as disparate as stockholder and stakeholder theory both leave this central assumption unchallenged. Each theory argues for a different set of external ethical restrictions, but neither adequately provides an internal connection between business and the ethical rules business people are obliged to follow. This paper attempts to make (...)
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  26. W. M. Mande (2012). Business Ethics Course and Readiness of MBA Students to Manage Ethically. African Journal of Business Ethics 6 (2):133.score: 270.0
    The study explored the contribution of a business ethics course at Nkumba University, Uganda to the readiness of MBA students to manage enterprises ethically. A purposely designed questionnaire was distributed to 42 students who had completed the course. The major finding was that these MBA students had 30% readiness to manage ethically. To establish whether this readiness was a function of the business ethics course, a path analysis was done to develop a hypothesised model. This model (...)
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  27. John Tsalikis & Bruce Seaton (2008). The International Business Ethics Index: Japan. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 80 (2):379 - 385.score: 270.0
    The Business Ethics Index (BEI) was expanded in Japan. The overall BEI for Japan stands at 99.1 – slightly on the negative side. The component BEI patterns were similar to those in the U.S. In an open-ended question about their ethical experiences as consumers, the Japanese were concerned about customer service and good management practices.
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  28. Luc van Liedekerke & Wim Dubbink (2008). Twenty Years of European Business Ethics – Past Developments and Future Concerns. Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):273-280.score: 270.0
    Over the past 20 years business ethics in Europe witnessed a remarkable growth. Today business ethics is faced with two challenges. The first comes from the social sciences and consultants who have both reclaimed the topics of business ethics, regretfully often at the loss of the proper ethical perspective. The second comes from the remarkable rise of corporate social responsibility which has pushed aside the mainstream business ethics methodology with its emphasis on (...)
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  29. William Kline (2012). Hume's Theory of Business Ethics Revisited. Journal of Business Ethics 105 (2):163-174.score: 270.0
    Hume’s examination of the conventions of property, trade, and contract addresses the moral foundations that make business possible. In this light, Hume’s theory of justice is also a foundational work in business ethics. In Hume’s analysis of these conventions, both philosophers and game theorists have correctly identified “proto” game-theoretic elements. One of the few attempts to offer a Humean theory of business ethics rests on this game-theoretic interpretation of Hume’s argument. This article argues that game-theoretic (...)
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  30. Gael M. McDonald & Gabriel D. Donleavy (1995). Objections to the Teaching of Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 14 (10):839 - 853.score: 270.0
    To date the teaching of business ethics has been examined from the descriptive, prescriptive, and analytical perspectives. The descriptive perspective has reviewed the existence of ethics courses (e.g., Schoenfeldtet al., 1991; Bassiry, 1990; Mahoney, 1990; Singh, 1989), their historical development (e.g., Sims and Sims, 1991), and the format and syllabi of ethics courses (e.g., Hoffman and Moore, 1982). Alternatively, the prescriptive literature has centred on the pedagogical issues of teaching ethics (e.g., Hunt and Bullis, 1991; (...)
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  31. John Tsalikis & Bruce Seaton (2007). The International Business Ethics Index: European Union. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 75 (3):229 - 238.score: 270.0
    The present study expands the systematic measurement of consumers’ sentiments towards business ethical practices to the international arena. Data for the Business Ethics Index (BEI) were gathered in three countries of the European Union (UK, Germany, Spain). The Germans were the most pessimistic while the British were the most optimistic about the future ethical behaviour of businesses.
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  32. Gabriel D. Donleavy, Kit-Chun Joanna Lam & Simon S. M. Ho (2008). Does East Meet West in Business Ethics: An Introduction to the Special Issue. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 79 (1/2):1 - 8.score: 270.0
    This article introduces and summarizes selected papers from the first World Business Ethics Forum held in Hong Kong and Macau in November 2006, co-hosted by the Hong Kong Baptist University and by the University of Macau. Business Ethics in the East remain distinct from those in the West, but the distinctions are becoming less pronounced and the ethical traffic flows both ways.
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  33. Kirsten E. Martin & R. Edward Freeman (2004). The Separation of Technology and Ethics in Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 53 (4):353-364.score: 270.0
    The purpose of this paper is to draw out and make explicit the assumptions made in the treatment of technology within business ethics. Drawing on the work of Freeman (1994, 2000) on the assumed separation between business and ethics, we propose a similar separation exists in the current analysis of technology and ethics. After first identifying and describing the separation thesis assumed in the analysis of technology, we will explore how this assumption manifests itself in (...)
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  34. Patrick E. Murphy (ed.) (2004). Business Ethics. Wiley.score: 270.0
    If there’s one thing the Enron fiasco and other recent corporate ethical violations have proven, it’s that it’s time to reexamine how we do business. That’s why Fast Company magazine looks to the organizations and people who are rewriting the rules and reinventing business. Fast Company is the place to turn for influential voices on the future of business and innovative solutions to real problems in the post-Enron World. Now you can get the latest thinking on (...) ethics and corporate responsibility, Fast Company style! Featuring twenty-three articles, grouped into six topic areas, this Fast Company ethics reader provides essential guidelines, tips, and insights that will help you promote ethical decision making in your organization and in your own day-to-day activities. (shrink)
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  35. John Tsalikis & Bruce Seaton (2006). Business Ethics Index: Measuring Consumer Sentiments Toward Business Ethical Practices. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 64 (4):317 - 326.score: 270.0
    The present study describes the development of an ongoing and systematic index to measure consumers’ sentiments towards business ethical practices. The Business Ethics Index (BEI) is based on the well established measurements of consumer sentiments, namely the ICS (Index of Consumer Sentiment) and CBCCI (Conference Board Consumer Confidence Index). The BEI is comprised of 4 measurements representing the dimensions of “personal-vicarious” and “past-future.” Data from 503 telephone interviews were used to calculate a BEI of 107. This indicates (...)
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  36. Ethan P. Waples, Alison L. Antes, Stephen T. Murphy, Shane Connelly & Michael D. Mumford (2009). A Meta-Analytic Investigation of Business Ethics Instruction. Journal of Business Ethics 87 (1):133 - 151.score: 270.0
    The education of students and professionals in business ethics is an increasingly important goal on the agenda of business schools and corporations. The present study provides a meta-analysis of 25 previously conducted business ethics instructional programs. The role of criteria, study design, participant characteristics, quality of instruction, instructional content, instructional program characteristics, and characteristics of instructional methods as moderators of the effectiveness of business ethics instruction were examined. Overall, results indicate that business (...)
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  37. Chen-Fong Wu (2004). Research on a Typology of Business Ethics Operation Across the Taiwan Strait. Journal of Business Ethics 52 (3):229-242.score: 270.0
    The practice of business ethics is a constant concern for both business and academics. Thus this study attempts both to explore the effective performance of business ethics and to provide a learned reference. The researcher has gathered relevant literature, developed a notion of business ethics operation which have been put to the test within four selected enterprises across the Taiwan Strait. The findings reveal that different types of ethical leadership and catalytic mechanism precipitated (...)
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  38. Luc K. Audebrand & Thierry C. Pauchant (2009). Can the Fair Trade Movement Enrich Traditional Business Ethics? An Historical Study of its Founders in Mexico. Journal of Business Ethics 87 (3):343 - 353.score: 270.0
    As the need for more diversity in business ethics is becoming more pressing in our global world, we provide an historical study of a Fair Trade (FT) movement, born in rural Mexico. We first focus on the basic assumptions of its founders, which include a worker–priest, Frans van der Hoff, a group of native Indians and local farmers who formed a cooperative, and an NGO, Max Havelaar. We then review both the originalities and challenges of the FT movement (...)
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  39. Kam C. Chan, Hung-Gay Fung & Jot Yau (2010). Business Ethics Research: A Global Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 95 (1):39 - 53.score: 270.0
    Using 10 years of publication data (1999-2008) from 10 leading business ethics journals, we examine global patterns of business ethics research and contributing institutions and scholars. Although U.S. academic institutions continue to lead in the contributions toward business ethics research, Asian and European institutions have made significant progress. Our study shows that business ethics research output is closely linked to the missions of the institutions driven by their values or religious belief. An (...)
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  40. David Allen Jones (2009). A Novel Approach to Business Ethics Training: Improving Moral Reasoning in Just a Few Weeks. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (2):367 - 379.score: 270.0
    I assessed change in students’ moral reasoning following five 75-min classes on business ethics and two assignments utilizing a novel pedagogical approach designed to foster ethical reasoning skills. To minimize threats to validity present in previous studies, an untreated control group design with pre- and post-training measures was used. Training (n = 114) and control (n = 76) groups comprised freshmen business majors who completed the Defining Issues Test before and after the training. Results showed that, controlling (...)
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  41. Mark S. Schwartz (2012). The State of Business Ethics in Israel: A Light Unto the Nations? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 105 (4):429-446.score: 270.0
    Whether the nation of Israel has become a “light unto the nations” in terms of ethical behavior among its business community remains in doubt. To examine the current state of business ethics in Israel, the study examines the following: (1) the extent of business ethics education in Israel; (2) the existence of formal corporate ethics program elements based on an annual survey of over 50 large Israeli corporations conducted over 5 years (2006–2010); and (3) (...)
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  42. Ryan Burg (2009). Deliberative Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 88 (4):665 - 683.score: 270.0
    Social norms are an important input for ethical decisions in any business context. However, the cross-cultural discovery of extant social norms presents a special challenge to international management because norms may be inscrutable to outsiders. This article considers the contribution of Integrative Social Contracts Theory (ISCT) to the analysis of social norms in business ethics. It questions the origins and dynamics of norms from a sociological perspective, and identifies a tension between prescriptive efforts to make norms obligatory (...)
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  43. Wayne Norman (2011). Business Ethics as Self-Regulation: Why Principles That Ground Regulations Should Be Used to Ground Beyond-Compliance Norms as Well. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 102 (S1):43-57.score: 270.0
    Theories of business ethics or corporate responsibility tend to focus on justifying obligations that go above and beyond what is required by law. This article examines the curious fact that most business ethics scholars use concepts, principles, and normative methods for identifying and justifying these beyond-compliance obligations that are very different from the ones that are used to set the levels of regulations themselves. Its modest proposal—a plea for a research agenda, really—is that we could reduce (...)
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  44. William Arthur Wines (2008). Seven Pillars of Business Ethics: Toward a Comprehensive Framework. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 79 (4):483 - 499.score: 270.0
    This article first addresses the question of “why” we teach business ethics. Our answer to “why” provides both a response to those who oppose business ethics courses and a direction for course content. We believe a solid, comprehensive course in business ethics should address not only moral philosophy, ethical dilemmas, and corporate social responsibility – the traditional pillars of the disciple – but also additional areas necessary to make sense of the goings-on in the (...)
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  45. Johannes Brinkmann (2009). Using Ibsen in Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (1):11 - 24.score: 270.0
    To celebrate the 100th anniversary of Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen's death, during 2006 quite a number of cultural events were launched (cf. http://www.ibsen.net/). The article suggests celebrating Ibsen as a potentially useful resource for business ethics teaching. Departing from a short presentation of Ibsen's plays An enemy of the people and A doll's house the main focus of this paper is on two selected scenes from the latter piece -both as raw material for developing scenarios for moral maturity (...)
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  46. Nhung T. Nguyen, M. Tom Basuray, William P. Smith, Donald Kopka & Donald McCulloh (2008). Moral Issues and Gender Differences in Ethical Judgment Using Reidenbach and Robin's (1990) Multidimensional Ethics Scale: Implications in Teaching of Business Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 77 (4):417 - 430.score: 270.0
    In this study, we examined moral issues and gender differences in ethical judgment using Reidenbach and Robin’s [Journal of Business Ethics 9 (1990) 639) multidimensional ethics scale (MES). A total of 340 undergraduate students were asked to provide ethical judgment by rating three moral issues in the MES labeled: ‚sales’, ‚auto’, and ‚retail’ using three ethics theories: moral equity, relativism, and contractualism. We found that female students’ ratings of ethical judgment were consistently higher than that of (...)
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  47. J. Kevin Quinn, J. David Reed, M. Neil Browne & Wesley J. Hiers (1997). Honesty, Individualism, and Pragmatic Business Ethics: Implications for Corporate Hierarchy. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 16 (12-13):1419-1430.score: 270.0
    The boundaries of honesty are the focal point of this exploration of the individualistic origins of modernist ethics and the consequent need for a more pragmatic approach to business ethics. The tendency of modernist ethics to see honesty as an individual responsibility is described as a contextually naive approach, one that fails to account for the interactive effects between individual choices and corporate norms. By reviewing the empirical accounts of managerial struggles with ethical dilemmas, the article (...)
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  48. Chen-Fong Wu (2002). The Relationship of Ethical Decision-Making to Business Ethics and Performance in Taiwan. Journal of Business Ethics 35 (3):163 - 176.score: 270.0
    This paper examines the relationship of ethical decision-making by individuals to corporate business ethics and organizational performance of three groups: (i) SMEs (small and medium enterprises), (ii) Outstanding SMEs (the Key Stone Award winners) and (iii) Large Enterprises, in order to provide a reference for Taiwanese entrepreneurs to practice better business ethics. The survey method involved random sampling of 132 enterprises within three groups. Some 524 out of 1320 questionnaires were valid. The survey results demonstrated that (...)
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  49. V. Brand (2009). Empirical Business Ethics Research and Paradigm Analysis. Journal of Business Ethics 86 (4):429 - 449.score: 270.0
    Despite the so-called ‘paradigm wars’ in many social sciences disciplines in recent decades, debate as to the appropriate philosophical basis for research in business ethics has been comparatively non-existent. Any consideration of paradigm issues in the theoretical business ethics literature is rare and only very occasional references to relevant issues have been made in the empirical journal literature. This is very much the case in the growing fields of cross-cultural business ethics and undergraduate student (...)
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  50. Giulia Calabretta, Boris Durisin & Marco Ogliengo (2011). Uncovering the Intellectual Structure of Research in Business Ethics: A Journey Through the History, the Classics, and the Pillars of Journal of Business Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 104 (4):499-524.score: 270.0
    After almost 30 years of publications, Journal of Business Ethics (JBE) has achieved the position of main marketplace for business ethics discussion and knowledge generation. Given the large amount of knowledge produced, an assessment of the state of the art could benefit both the constructive development of the discipline and the further growth of the journal itself. As the evolution of a discipline is set to be reflected in the evolution of its leading journal, we attempt (...)
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