Search results for 'By Crawford L. Elder' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  2
    Crawford L. Elder (2004). Real Natures and Familiar Objects. A Bradford Book.
    In _Real Natures and Familiar Objects_ Crawford Elder defends, with qualifications, the ontology of common sense. He argues that we exist -- that no gloss is necessary for the statement "human beings exist" to show that it is true of the world as it really is -- and that we are surrounded by many of the medium-sized objects in which common sense believes. He argues further that these familiar medium-sized objects not only exist, but have essential properties, which (...)
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  2. Crawford L. Elder (2005). Real Natures and Familiar Objects. A Bradford Book.
    In _Real Natures and Familiar Objects_ Crawford Elder defends, with qualifications, the ontology of common sense. He argues that we exist -- that no gloss is necessary for the statement "human beings exist" to show that it is true of the world as it really is -- and that we are surrounded by many of the medium-sized objects in which common sense believes. He argues further that these familiar medium-sized objects not only exist, but have essential properties, which (...)
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  3. Crawford L. Elder (2009). Real Essentialism • by David S. Oderberg. Analysis 69 (2):376-378.
    This book presents vigorous and wide-ranging arguments in defense of an Aristotelian metaphysical scheme along fairly orthodox Thomistic lines. The central claim is that the items that populate the world have real essences – natures that mind-independently define what each such item is. This Aristotelian essentialism, Oderberg begins by telling us, is a different doctrine from what has recently been called ‘essentialism’, and a more powerful one . For recent essentialism has treated a thing's essence as merely all those properties (...)
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  4.  56
    Crawford L. Elder (2011). Familiar Objects and Their Shadows. Cambridge University Press.
    Most contemporary metaphysicians are sceptical about the reality of familiar objects such as dogs and trees, people and desks, cells and stars. They prefer an ontology of the spatially tiny or temporally tiny. Tiny microparticles 'dog-wise arranged' explain the appearance, they say, that there are dogs; microparticles obeying microphysics collectively cause anything that a baseball appears to cause; temporal stages collectively sustain the illusion of enduring objects that persist across changes. Crawford L. Elder argues that all such attempts (...)
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  5. Crawford L. Elder (2013). Familiar Objects and Their Shadows. Cambridge University Press.
    Most contemporary metaphysicians are sceptical about the reality of familiar objects such as dogs and trees, people and desks, cells and stars. They prefer an ontology of the spatially tiny or temporally tiny. Tiny microparticles 'dog-wise arranged' explain the appearance, they say, that there are dogs; microparticles obeying microphysics collectively cause anything that a baseball appears to cause; temporal stages collectively sustain the illusion of enduring objects that persist across changes. Crawford L. Elder argues that all such attempts (...)
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  6.  1
    George Elder (1990). Reviews the bookBuddhist Insight: Essays by Alex Wayman,'Edited by George R. Elder. Philosophy East and West 40 (2):254-256.
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  7.  29
    Crawford L. Elder (2008). Biological Species Are Natural Kinds. Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (3):339-362.
    This paper argues that typical biological species are natural kinds, on a familiar realist understanding of natural kinds—classes of individuals across which certain properties cluster together, in virtue of the causal workings of the world. But the clustering is far from exceptionless. Virtually no properties, or property-combinations, characterize every last member of a typical species—unless they can also appear outside the species. This motivates some to hold that what ties together the members of a species is the ability to interbreed, (...)
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  8.  84
    Crawford L. Elder (2008). Against Universal Mereological Composition. Dialectica 62 (4):433-454.
    This paper opposes universal mereological composition (UMC). Sider defends it: unless UMC were true, he says, it could be indeterminate how many objects there are in the world. I argue that there is no general connection between how widely composition occurs and how many objects there are in the world. Sider fails to support UMC. I further argue that we should disbelieve in UMC objects. Existing objections against them say that they are radically unlike Aristotelian substances. True, but there is (...)
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  9.  49
    Crawford L. Elder (2006). Conventionalism and Realism‐Imitating Counterfactuals. Philosophical Quarterly 56 (222):1-15.
    Historically, opponents of realism have managed to slip beneath a key objection which realists raise against them. The opponents say that some element of the world is constructed by our cognitive practices; realists retort that the element would have existed unaltered, had our practices differed; the opponents sometimes agree, contending that we construct in just such a way as to render the counterfactual true. The contemporary instalment of this debate starts with conventionalism about modality, which holds that the borders of (...)
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  10. Crawford L. Elder (2001). The Problem of Harmonizing Laws. Philosophical Studies 105 (1):25 - 41.
    More laws obtain in the world,it appears, than just those of microphysics –e.g. laws of genetics, perceptual psychology,economics. This paper assumes there indeedare laws in the special sciences, and notjust scrambled versions of microphysical laws. Yet the objects which obey them are composedwholly of microparticles. How can themicroparticles in such an object lawfully domore than what is required of them by the lawsof microphysics? Are there additional laws formicroparticles – which seems to violate closureof microphysics – or is the ``more'' (...)
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  11. Crawford L. Elder (1998). What Sensory Signals Are About. Analysis 58 (4):273-276.
    In ‘Of Sensory Systems and the “Aboutness” of Mental States’, Kathleen Akins (1996) argues against what she calls ‘the traditional view’ about sensory systems, according to which they are detectors of features in the environment outside the organism. As an antidote, she considers the case of thermoreception, a system whose sensors send signals about how things stand with themselves and their immediate dermal surround (a ‘narcissistic’ sensory system); and she closes by suggesting that the signals from many sensory systems may (...)
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  12.  29
    Crawford L. Elder (2007). On the Phenomenon of "Dog-Wise Arrangement". Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (1):132–155.
    An influential line of thought in metaphysics holds that where common sense discerns a tree or a dog or a baseball there may be just many microparticles. Provided the microparticles are arranged in the right way -- are “treewise” or “dogwise” or “baseballwise” arranged -- our sensory experiences will be just the same as if a tree or dog or baseball were really there. Therefore whether there really are suchfamiliar objects in the world can be decided only by determining what (...)
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  13.  86
    Crawford L. Elder (1999). Physicalism and the Fallacy of Composition. Philosophical Quarterly 49 (200):332-43.
    A mutation alters the hemoglobin in some members of a species of antelope, and as a result the members fare better at high altitudes than their conspecifics do; so high-altitude foraging areas become open to them that are closed to their conspecifics; they thrive, reproduce at a greater rate, and the gene for altered hemoglobin spreads further through the gene pool of the species. That sounds like a classic example (owed to Karen Neander, 1995) of a causal chain traced by (...)
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  14.  80
    Crawford L. Elder (2001). Mental Causation Versus Physical Causation: No Contest. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (1):110-127.
    James decides that the best price today on pork chops is at Supermarket S, then James makes driving motions for twenty minutes, then James’ car enters the parking lot at Supermarket S. Common sense supposes that the stages in this sequence may be causally connected, and that the pattern is commonplace: James’ belief (together with his desire for pork chops) causes bodily behavior, and the behavior causes a change in James’ whereabouts. Anyone committed to the idea that beliefs and desires (...)
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  15.  75
    Crawford L. Elder (1998). Essential Properties and Coinciding Objects. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 58 (2):317-331.
    Common sense believes in objects which, if real, routinely lose component parts or particles. Statues get chipped, people undergo haircuts and amputations, and ships have planks replaced. Sometimes philosophers argue that in addition to these objects, there are others which could not possibly lose any of their parts or particles, nor have new ones added to them--objects which could not possibly have been bigger or smaller, at any time, than how they actually were.1 (Sometimes the restriction on size is argued (...)
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  16.  61
    Crawford L. Elder (2011). The Alleged Supervenience of Everything on Microphysics. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 11 (1):87-95.
    Here is a view at least much like Lewis’s “Humean supervenience,” and in any case highly influential—in that some endorse it, and many more worry that it is true. All truths about the world are fixed by the pattern of instantiation, by individual points in space-time, of the “perfectly natural properties” posited by end-of-inquiry physics. In part, this view denies independent variability: the world could not have been different from how it actually is, in the ways depicted by common sense (...)
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  17.  44
    Crawford L. Elder (1999). Ontology and Realism About Modality. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 77 (3):292 – 302.
    To be a realist about modality, need one claim that more exists than just the various objects and properties that populate the world—e.g. worlds other than the actual one, or maximal consistent sets of propositions? Or does the existence of objects and properties by itself involve the obtaining of necessities (and possibilities) in re? The latter position is now unpopular but not unfamiliar. Aristotle held that objects have essences, and hence necessarily have certain properties. Recently it has been argued that (...)
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  18.  32
    Crawford L. Elder (2007). On the Phenomenon of “Dog- Wise Arrangement”. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (1):132-155.
    An influential line of thought in metaphysics holds that where common sense discerns a tree or a dog or a baseball there may be just many microparticles. Provided the microparticles are arranged in the right way -- are “treewise” or “dogwise” or “baseballwise” arranged -- our sensory experiences will be just the same as if a tree or dog or baseball were really there. Therefore whether there really are suchfamiliar objects in the world can be decided only by determining what (...)
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  19.  42
    Crawford L. Elder (2013). On the Reality and Causal Efficacy of Familiar Objects. Philosophia 41 (3):737-749.
    What caused the event we report by saying “the window shattered”? Was it the baseball, which crashed into the window? Causal exclusionists say: many, many microparticles collectively caused that event—microparticles located where common sense supposes the baseball was. Unitary large objects such as baseballs cause nothing; indeed, by Alexander’s dictum, there are no such objects. This paper argues that the false claim about causal efficacy is instead the one that attributes it to the many microparticles. Causation obtains just where there (...)
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  20.  43
    Crawford L. Elder (2001). Materialism and the Mediated Causation of Behavior. Philosophical Studies 103 (2):165-75.
    Are judgements and wishes reallybrain events (or brain states) which will be affirmedby a completed scientific account of how humanbehavior is caused? Materialists, other thaneliminativists, say Yes. But brain events do notcause muscle contractions, hence bodily movements,directly. They do so, if at all, by triggeringintermediate causes, viz. firings in motor nerves. Soit is crucial, this paper argues, whether they arecharacterized as biological events –performances of naturally-selected-for operations – orinstead as complex microphysical events. ``Acauses B, B causes C, so A causes (...)
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  21.  46
    Crawford L. Elder (2005). Undercutting the Idea of Carving Reality. Southern Journal of Philosophy 43 (1):41-59.
    It is widely supposed that, in Hilary Putnam’s phrase, there are no “ready-made objects” (Putnam 1982; cf. Putnam 1981, Ch. 3). Instead the objects we consider real are partly of our own making: we carve them out of the world (or out of experience). The usual reason for supposing this lies in the claim that there are available to us alternative ways of “dividing reality” into objects (to quote the title of Hirsch 1993), ways which would afford us every bit (...)
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  22.  19
    Crawford L. Elder (2001). Can Contrariety Be Reduced to Contradiction? Croatian Journal of Philosophy 1 (1):1-4.
    Can an ontology which treats properties as really out there in the world be combined vvith the view that necessity is not out there? What about the necessity by which redness excludes greenness, or weighing 8 kg excludes weighing 6 kg? Armstrong, who combines property realism with logical atomism, argues that such exclusions reflect just the trivial necessity that a whole cannot be any of its proper parts. Buthis argument fails for colors themselves and for other cases of contrary properties. (...)
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  23.  18
    Crawford L. Elder (2000). Physicalism and the Falacy of Composition. Philosophical Quarterly 50 (200):332-343.
    A mutation alters the hemoglobin in some members of a species of antelope, and as a result the members fare better at high altitudes than their conspecifics do; so high-altitude foraging areas become open to them that are closed to their conspecifics; they thrive, reproduce at a greater rate, and the gene for altered hemoglobin spreads further through the gene pool of the species. That sounds like a classic example (owed to Karen Neander, 1995) of a causal chain traced by (...)
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  24. Nathan Wildman (2012). Familiar Objects and Their Shadows. By Crawford L. Elder. (Cambridge UP, 2011. Pp. Xi + 210. Price £50.00, $85.00 H/B.). [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 62 (246):195-197.
  25.  33
    D. L. Goswick (2012). Familiar Objects and Their Shadows, by Crawford Elder. Mind 121 (481):176-181.
  26.  6
    Christopher L. Stephens, Janine Jones & What Could Turn Out (2001). Mary Kate Mcgowan/Privileging Properties 1–23 Crawford L. Elder/the Problem of Harmonizing Laws 25–41 Gary Ebbs/is Skepticism About Self-Knowledge Coherent? 43–58 David Braun/Russellianism and Prediction 59–105. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 105:309-310.
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  27. H. S. Harris (1982). Crawford Elder, Appropriating Hegel Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 2 (5):217-219.
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  28. Ronald Singer (1974). Methods and Theories of Anthropological Genetics Edited by M. H. Crawford and P. L. Workman. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 18 (1):144-145.
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  29.  33
    By Crawford L. Elder (2006). Conventionalism and Realism-Imitating Counterfactuals. Philosophical Quarterly 56 (222):1–15.
    Historically, opponents of realism have argued that the world’s objects are constructed by our cognitive activities—or, less colorfully, that they exist and are as they are only relative to our ways of thinking and speaking. To this realists have stoutly replied that even if we had thought or spoken in ways different from our actual ones, the world would still have been populated by the same objects as it actually is, or at least by most of them. (Our thinking differently (...)
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  30.  11
    Patricia A. Ralston, Anne E. Larson & Cathy L. Bays (2012). An Assessment of Undergraduate Engineering Students' Critical Thinking Skills Guided by the Paul-Elder Critical Thinking Framework. Inquiry 26 (3):25-32.
    Faculty in a large, urban school of engineering designed a longitudinal study to assess the critical thinking skills of undergraduate students as they progressed through the engineering program. The Paul-Elder critical thinking framework was used to design course assignments and develop a holistic assessment rubric. This paper presents the analysis of the freshman course artifacts and associated faculty scoring sessions for all three cohorts. A total of 649 first semester freshman students at least 18 years old agreed to participate (...)
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  31. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (eds.) (2007). Creations of the Mind: Theories of Artifacts and Their Representaion. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Creations of the Mind presents sixteen original essays by theorists from a wide variety of disciplines who have a shared interest in the nature of artifacts and their implications for the human mind. All the papers are written specially for this volume, and they cover a broad range of topics concerned with the metaphysics of artifacts, our concepts of artifacts and the categories that they represent, the emergence of an understanding of artifacts in infants' cognitive development, as well as the (...)
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  32.  8
    B. L. Hallward (1932). The Elder Africanus Scipio Africanus in the Second Punic War. By Howard H. Scullard. Pp. Xv + 331; 3 Plates, 8 Plans, Maps. Cambridge: University Press, 1929. Cloth, 12s. 6d. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 46 (01):24-25.
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  33.  13
    Peter J. Arnold (2004). The Philosophical Athlete By Heather L. Reid. Published 2002 by Carolina Academic Press, Durham, NC. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 31 (1):97-99.
    (2004). The Philosophical Athlete By Heather L. Reid. Published 2002 by Carolina Academic Press, Durham, NC. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport: Vol. 31, No. 1, pp. 97-99.
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  34. Kristen Irwin (2016). Les Lumières de Leibniz: Controverses Avec Huet, Bayle, Regis Et More by Mogens Lærke. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (2):338-339.
    The historiography of philosophy is a hot topic these days. One need only peruse the 2013 Philosophy and Its History, edited by Mogens Lærke, Justin E. H. Smith, and Eric Schliesser, or this journal’s debate between Daniel Garber and Michael Della Rocca, to see that methodological issues in the history of philosophy are the subject of substantive contemporary discussion. In the volume under review, Lærke defends an approach to the historiography of philosophy that is fundamentally inseparable from the history of (...)
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  35.  8
    Max Grober (2012). Essays on David Hume, Medical Men and the Scottish Enlightenment: 'Industry, Knowledge and Humanity.' by Roger L. Emerson. [REVIEW] Hume Studies 38 (2):243-247.
    This volume collects ten essays by the distinguished historian Roger L. Emerson. Many are augmented versions of public lectures or conference papers, and all advance Emerson’s career-long study of the Scottish Enlightenment, its social foundations, and its institutional embodiments. Emerson states his case and names his rivals in the anchor piece of the collection, “What is to be Done About the Scottish Enlightenment?” The Scottish Enlightenment, he argues, was a broad-based, indigenous movement of long standing, largely independent of English models. (...)
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  36. W. Davie (2000). David Hume. An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding. Edited by Tom L. Beauchamp. Hume Studies 26 (2):344-346.
  37. Fritz J. McDonald (2013). New Waves in Metaethics By Michael Brady * New Waves in Truth By Cory D. Wright and Nikolaj J.L.L. Pedersen. Analysis 73 (2):400-402.
    Review of New Waves in Metaethics, edited by Michael Brady; and New Waves in Truth, edited by Cory D. Wright and Nikolaj J.L.L. Pedersen.
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  38.  49
    Jeff Jordan (2009). Review of William L. Rowe on Philosophy of Religion: Selected Writings , Edited by Nick Trakakis. [REVIEW] Sophia 48 (4):495-496.
    ‘William L. Rowe on Philosophy of Religion’ edited by Nick Trakakis, collects 30 papers of William Rowe's important work in the philosophy of religion. I review this collection, and offer an objection of one of Rowe's arguments.
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  39.  23
    Jean-Luc Rinaudo (2012). Espace et temps vécus dans les pratiques professionnelles enseignantes médiatisées par les technologies de l’information et de la communicationSpace and Time Lived in the Teachers’ Professional Practices Mediatised by Information and Communication Technologies. Phronesis 1 (1):85-91.
    From several researches in educational sciences, the aim of this text is to understand how virtuality questions the professional situation of the teachers, in particular in the unconscious dimensions of the space and of time. The unconscious dimension of professional situation is revealing by the work of unlinking which the context of the information and communication technologies creates. -/- Ce texte tente de repérer à partir de plusieurs travaux de recherche menés en sciences de l’éducation comment la virtualité vient remettre (...)
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  40.  14
    François Aubry & Yves Couturier (2012). L’Habilitation des Nouveaux Préposés aux Bénéficiaires Par le Groupe de Pairs Dans les Organisations Gériatriques de Type CHSLD au QuébecEnablement of the News Recruits by the Peer Group in Geriatric Organizations Like CHSLD in Quebec. Phronesis 1 (2):5-14.
    The aim of this article is to show how the integration of new nursing assistants in nursing homes in Quebec can be analyzed as a process of “enablement” or identity construction of the recruits by peer group through two specific phases: experienced nursing assistants quickly judge the ability of the recruit to support the heavy workload during the phase known as “orientation”, selecting recruits by this criterion; and they will transmit some informal competences to recruits selected and considered able to (...)
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  41.  48
    Paul B. Thompson (2013). F. Bailey Norwood and Jayson L. Lusk: Compassion by the Pound: The Economics of Farm Animal Welfare. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (2):517-521.
    F. Bailey Norwood and Jayson L. Lusk: Compassion by the Pound: The Economics of Farm Animal Welfare Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-5 DOI 10.1007/s10806-012-9377-z Authors Paul B. Thompson, WK Kellogg Professor of Agricultural, Food and Community Ethics, Department of Philosophy, Michigan State University, 503 South Kedzie Hall, East Lansing, MI 48824-1032, USA Journal Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics Online ISSN 1573-322X Print ISSN 1187-7863.
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  42.  20
    Gregory Landini (forthcoming). Ontology Made Easy By Amie L. Thomasson. Analysis:anw057.
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  43.  30
    James D. Sellmann (2013). Philosophy and Religion in Early Medieval China Ed. By Alan K. L. Chan and Yuet-Keung Lo (Review). Philosophy East and West 63 (3):451-455.
    The Early Han enjoyed some prosperity while it struggled with centralization and political control of the kingdom. The Later Han was plagued by the court intrigue, corrupt eunuchs, and massive flooding of the Yellow River that eventually culminated in popular uprisings that led to the demise of the dynasty. The period that followed was a renewed warring states period that likewise stimulated a rebirth of philosophical and religious debate, growth, and innovations. Alan K. L. Chan and Yuet-Keung Lo's Philosophy and (...)
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  44.  6
    P. Cornelissen, M. C. Gresnigt, R. A. Vermeulen, J. Bokdam & R. Smit, Transition of a Sambucus Nigra L. Dominated Woody Vegetation Into Grassland by a Self Regulating Multi-Species Herbivore Assemblage.
    We describe and analyse how large herbivores strongly diminished a woody vegetation, dominated by the unpalatable shrub Sambucus nigra L. and changed it into grassland. Density of woody species and cover of vegetation were measured in 1996, 2002 and 2012 in the grazed Oostvaardersplassen. In 2002 and 2012 we also measured density and cover in an ungrazed control site. In 2002 we measured intensity of browsing and bark loss of Sambucus shrubs in the grazed and control sites. In the grazed (...)
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  45.  8
    Alpesh Maisuria (2011). Critical Race Theory Matters: Education and Ideology. By M. Zamudio, C. Russell, M. A. Rios and J. L. Bridgeman. British Journal of Educational Studies 59 (3):348-350.
    (2011). Critical Race Theory Matters: Education and Ideology. By M. Zamudio, C. Russell, M. A. Rios and J. L. Bridgeman. British Journal of Educational Studies: Vol. 59, Research capacity building, pp. 348-350.
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  46.  14
    Pao-Li Chang, Vincent C. H. Chua & Moshé Machover, L S Penrose's Limit Theorem: Tests by Simulation.
    L S Penrose’s Limit Theorem – which is implicit in Penrose [7, p. 72] and for which he gave no rigorous proof – says that, in simple weighted voting games, if the number of voters increases indefinitely and the relative quota is pegged, then – under certain conditions – the ratio between the voting powers of any two voters converges to the ratio between their weights. Lindner and Machover [4] prove some special cases of Penrose’s Limit Theorem. They give a (...)
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  47.  4
    Rodrigo Coppe Caldeira (2013). HEFT, James L. (Edited by). After Vatican II. Trajectories and hermeneutics. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2012. Horizonte 11 (29):421-424.
    RESENHA HEFT, James L. (Edited by). After Vatican II . Trajectories and hermeneutics. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2012.
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  48.  6
    A. Berriedale Keith (1910). Farnell's Cults of the Greek States The Cults of the Greek States. By L. R. Farnell, D. Litt. Vol. V. Pp. Xii+496, with 19 Collotypes and 41 Other Illustrations. Price 18s. 6d. Net. Clarendon Press, Oxford. 1909. [REVIEW] Classical Quarterly 4 (04):282-.
    The Cults of the Greek States. By L. R. Farnell, D. Litt. Vol. V. Pp. xii+496, with 19 collotypes and 41 other illustrations. Price 18s. 6d. net. Clarendon Press, Oxford. 1909.
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  49.  34
    Lajos L. Brons (2016). Engaging Buddhism: Why It Matters to Philosophy, by Jay L. Garfield. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 94 (2):415-415.
  50.  8
    Silver Bronzo (2016). Review of Representation and Reality in Wittgenstein's Tractatus by J. L. Zalabardo. [REVIEW] Nordic Wittgenstein Review 5 (1):139-144.
    Book review of J. L. Zalabardo, Representation and Reality in Wittgenstein's Tractatus. Oxford: OUP 2015.
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