Search results for 'By James D. Sellmann' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. By James D. Sellmann & Jay Goulding (2004). Timing and Rulership in Master Lü's Spring and Autumn Annals (Lüshi Chunqiu). Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (2):305–309.score: 2010.0
  2. James D. Sellmann (2013). Philosophy and Religion in Early Medieval China Ed. By Alan K. L. Chan and Yuet-Keung Lo (Review). Philosophy East and West 63 (3):451-455.score: 1620.0
    The Early Han enjoyed some prosperity while it struggled with centralization and political control of the kingdom. The Later Han was plagued by the court intrigue, corrupt eunuchs, and massive flooding of the Yellow River that eventually culminated in popular uprisings that led to the demise of the dynasty. The period that followed was a renewed warring states period that likewise stimulated a rebirth of philosophical and religious debate, growth, and innovations. Alan K. L. Chan and Yuet-Keung Lo's Philosophy and (...)
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  3. James D. Sellmann & Hans Julius Schneider (2003). Liberating Language in Linji and Wittgenstein. Asian Philosophy 13 (2-3):103-113.score: 1260.0
    Our aim in this paper is to explicate some unexpected and striking similarities and equally important differences, which have not been discussed in the literature, between Wittgenstein's methodology and the approach of Chinese Chan or Japanese Zen Buddhism. We say ?unexpected? similarities because it is not a common practice, especially in the analytic tradition, to invest very much in comparative philosophy. The peculiarity of this study will be further accentuated in the view of those of the ?old school? who see (...)
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  4. James D. Sellmann (1999). The Origin and Role of the State According to the Li Shi Chunqiu. Asian Philosophy 9 (3):193 – 218.score: 1260.0
    To study the L shi chunqiu (or L -shih ch'un-ch'iu. Master L 's Spring and Autumn Annals is to enter into the tumultuous but progressive times of the Warring States period (403-221 BCE). 1 This period is commonly referred to as 'the pre-Qin period' because of the fundamental changes that occurred after the Qin unification. Liishi chunqiu was probably completed, in 241 BCE, by various scholars at the estate of L Buwei (L Pu-wei) the prime minister of Qin and tutor (...)
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  5. James D. Sellmann (1995). A Belated Response to Hu Shih and D. T. Suzuki. Philosophy East and West 45 (1):97-104.score: 1125.0
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  6. James D. Sellmann (2013). Major, John S., Sarah A. Queen, Andrew Seth Meyer, and Harold D. Roth (Translators and Editors), The Huainanzi, A Guide to the Theory and Practice of Government in Early Han China of L Iu An, King of Huainan, New York: Columbia University Press, 2010, Xi + 986 Pages and Major, John S., Sarah A. Queen, Andrew Seth Meyer, and Harold D. Roth (Translators and Editors), The Essential Huainanzi of L Iu An, King of Huainan, New York: Columbia University Press, 2012, Vii + 252 Pages. [REVIEW] Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (2):267-270.score: 1125.0
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  7. James D. Sellmann (2009). Asian Insights on Violence and Peace. Asian Philosophy 19 (2):159 – 171.score: 855.0
    This paper challenges the view that justice leads to or generates peace. Islamic, Hindu, Buddhist, Confucian, Daoist and Chinese military philosophical perspectives on violence and peace are reviewed. Based on insights derived from these Asian traditions concerning the relationship between violence and peace, the author argues that the quest for world peace is not attainable. The author proposes that people need to direct their attention, energy and action to support personal and community peace, and to support justice, which entails legitimate (...)
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  8. James D. Sellmann (1999). David L. Hall, and Roger T. Ames, Thinking From the Hun: Self Truth, and Transcendence in Chinese and Western Culture. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 26 (4):513-520.score: 855.0
  9. James D. Sellmann (2006). On the Origin of Shang and Zhou Law. Asian Philosophy 16 (1):49 – 64.score: 855.0
    This paper refutes the hypothesis that Shang and Zhou law or penal law originated with the Miao tribe. After examining the sociological theory that custom is the basis of law, I focus on the role of ritual-action and law in Shang and Zhou China embodied in the military, the administrative operations at court, and in the records and literature, to show that the scientific position provides a reasonable interpretation that the Shang people originated their own law. The evidence for Shang (...)
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  10. James D. Sellmann (1995). Comment and Discussion. Philosophy East and West 45 (1):97-104.score: 855.0
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  11. James D. Sellmann (1987). Three Models of Self-Integration (Tzu Te) in Early China. Philosophy East and West 37 (4):372-391.score: 855.0
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  12. James D. Sellmann (1994). Robert E. Carter., Becoming Bamboo: Western and Eastern Explorations of the Meaning of Life. International Studies in Philosophy 26 (4):115-116.score: 855.0
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  13. James Sellmann (1995). Livia Kohn. The Taoist Experience. State University of New York Press, 1993. Pp. 391. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 22 (2):239-244.score: 240.0
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