Search results for 'By John Whipple' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. H. Grundmann Christoffer & R. Eckrich John (2011). Philosophy, Science and Divine Action Edited by F. LeRon Shults, Nancey Murphy, and Robert John Russell. Zygon 46 (3):764-765.score: 1260.0
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  2. Varol Akman (1995). Book Review -- Vladimir Lifschitz, Ed., Formalizing Common Sense: Papers by John McCarthy. [REVIEW] Philosophical Explorations.score: 168.0
    This is a review of Formalizing Common Sense: Papers by John McCarthy, ed. by Vladimir Lifschitz, published by Ablex Publishing Corp. in 1990.
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  3. Raymond Spier (2002). Reflections on ' Real Science: What It is, and What It Means ' by John Ziman. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (2):235-252.score: 168.0
    In these reflections on the recent book by John Ziman entitled ‘Real Science: What it is and what it means’, I have sought to review his main points and carry on the discussion that Ziman seeks to provoke. His approach to this subject arises from what exists on the ground and the way practising scientists view this area. I have taken a wider more abstract view of what is entailed by science than Ziman and have examined the implications of (...)
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  4. Hedwig Gorski (2004). Wajda's Films Bequest the Irony in Polish History, on The Cinema of Andrzej Wajda Edited by John Orr and Elzbieta Ostrowska. Film-Philosophy 8 (3).score: 168.0
    _The Cinema of Andrzej Wajda: The Art of Irony and Defiance_ Edited by John Orr and Elzbieta Ostrowska Foreword by Andrzej Wajda London: Wallflower Press, 2003 ISBN 1-903364-89-2 227 pages.
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  5. Giles Hudson (2010). Essay Review of 'The Ambassadors' Secret: Holbein and the World of the Renaissance' by John North. Annals of Science 60 (2):201-205.score: 168.0
    (2003). Essay Review of 'The Ambassadors' Secret: Holbein and the World of the Renaissance' by John North. Annals of Science: Vol. 60, No. 2, pp. 201-205.
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  6. Kathleen R. Kesson & James G. Henderson (2010). Reconceptualizing Professional Development for Curriculum Leadership: Inspired by John Dewey and Informed by Alain Badiou. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (2):213-229.score: 164.0
    Almost a hundred years ago, John Dewey clarified the relationship between democracy and education. However, the enactment of a 'deeply democratic' educational practice has proven elusive throughout the ensuing century, overridden by managerial approaches to schooling young people and to the standardized, technical preparation and professional development of teachers and educational leaders. A powerful counter-narrative to this 'standardized management paradigm' exists in the field of curriculum studies, but is largely ignored by mainstream approaches to the professional development of educators. (...)
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  7. Christopher J. Voparil (2014). Pragmatist Politics: Making the Case for Liberal Democracy by John McGowan (Review). Education and Culture 30 (1):113-118.score: 164.0
    Given how much the tradition owes to Dewey’s pragmatic reconstruction of philosophy, that more is not written of a political bent by those working under the sign of pragmatism is to me always surprising. John McGowan’s Pragmatist Politics is a shining exception. The book’s aim is “to articulate and practice a liberal democratic ethos inspired primarily by the American pragmatist tradition.”1 Two compelling opening chapters lay out McGowan’s melioristic conception of pragmatism as a philosophy of possibility animated by a (...)
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  8. Kelley Ross, By John R. Searle.score: 164.0
    The title of The Rediscovery of the Mind suggests the question "When was the mind lost?" Since most people may not be aware that it ever was lost, we must also then ask "Who lost it?" It was lost, of course, only by philosophers, by certain philosophers. This passed unnoticed by society at large. The "rediscovery" is also likely to pass unnoticed. But has the mind been rediscovered by the same philosophers who "lost" it? Probably not. John Searle is (...)
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  9. T. L. Zutlevics (2002). Response to “Cutting Bodies to Harvest Organs” by John Portmann (CQ Vol 8, No 3). Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (1):68-72.score: 164.0
    John Portmann attributes the current shortage of organs for transplantation to the dual effects of bioethics' reverence for autonomy and a general anxiety in the public about cutting bodies. Contrary to Portmann, I argue that attributing even partial blame to autonomy for organ shortages wrongly locates the problem. Indeed, there is reason to believe that waiting lists would be considerably shortened by respecting people's autonomy. I also question Portmann's explanation of the general aversion to organ donation in terms of (...)
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  10. Madison Powers (2014). Climate Matters: Ethics in a Warming World by John Broome (Review). [REVIEW] Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 24 (2):1-5.score: 164.0
    John Broome’s Climate Matters is a timely, elegant, and accessible book. His book is deliberately interdisciplinary, as is much of his work in moral philosophy more generally. The discussion of what should be done, and by whom, to prevent the adverse effects of climate change is informed by many years of philosophical engagement with economic theory, especially problems arising in the conceptualization and technical implementation of cost-benefit analysis.The central arguments in the book are informed as well by a longstanding (...)
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  11. John Campbell, An Interventionist Approach to Causation in Psychology by John Campbell.score: 152.0
    My project in this paper is to extend the interventionist analysis of causation to give an account of causation in psychology. Many aspects of empirical investigation into psychological causation fit straightforwardly into the interventionist framework. I address three problems. First, the problem of explaining what it is for a causal relation to be properly psychological rather than merely biological. Second, the problem of rational causation: how it is that reasons can be causes. Finally, I look at the implications of an (...)
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  12. Hansjörg Hohr (2013). The Concept of Experience by John Dewey Revisited: Conceiving, Feeling and “Enliving”. Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (1):25-38.score: 152.0
  13. Barbara Crostini (2009). Renaissance Education: Between Religion and Politics (CS 845). By Paul F. Grendler�Greeks and Latins in Renaissance Italy: Studies on Humanism and Philosophy in the 15thCentury (CS 801). By John Monfasani. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 50 (2):317-317.score: 152.0
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  14. Nomy Arpaly & John Doris (2005). Review: Comments on "Lack of Character" by John Doris. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 71 (3):643 - 647.score: 146.0
  15. Guy Axtell (2012). Achieving Knowledge: A Virtue-Theoretic Account of Epistemic Normativity. By John Greco. (Cambridge UP, 2010. Pp. X + 205. Price £17.99/US$29.99.). [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 62 (246):208-211.score: 146.0
    A Review of John Greco's book Acheiving Knowledge. The critical points I make involve three claims Greco makes that represent common ground between the reliabilists (including agent reliabilists like himself) and the character epistemologists (which would include myself): I. Such virtues are often needed to make our cognitive abilities reliable (to turn mere faculties into excellences); II. Such virtues might be essentially involved in goods other than knowledge; III. Such virtues might be valuable in themselves.
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  16. Stephen C. Angle (2004). New Confucianism: A Critical Examination, Edited by John Makeham. [REVIEW] Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (4):535–540.score: 146.0
    This collection of essays explores the development of the New Confucianism movement during the 20th century and questions whether it is, in fact, a distinctly new intellectual movement or one that has been mostly retrospectively created. The questions that contributors to this book seek to answer about this neo-conservative philosophical movement include: “What has been the cross-fertilization between Chinese scholars in China and overseas made possible by the shared discourse of Confucianism?” “To what extent does this discourse transcend geographical, political, (...)
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  17. John Turri (2012). Achieving Knowledge: A Virtue-Theoretic Account of Epistemic Normativity, by John Greco. Mind 121 (481):183-187.score: 146.0
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  18. Richard Holton (2000). Reviews of Meaning, Knowledge and Reality, and Mind, Value and Reality by John McDowell. [REVIEW] Times Literary Supplement.score: 146.0
    In a characteristic passage John McDowell says: [T]his is one of those set-ups that are familiar in philosophy, in which a supposedly exhaustive choice confers a spurious plausibility on a philosophical position. The apparent plausibility is not intrinsic to the position, but reflects an assumed framework; when one looks at the position on its own, the plausibility crumbles away ... In such a situation, the thing to do is to query the assumption that seems to force the choice.
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  19. Robert Guay, Aesthetics of Appearing. By Martin Seel. Translated by John Farrell. Stanford: Stanford University Press. 2005. Pp. XIV + 238. £16.95. [REVIEW]score: 146.0
    One of the many virtues of Martin Seel’s Aesthetics of Appearing is that it lays its cards on the table at the very outset. The final three chapters consist in a series of complex digressions from the main discussion: one on the aesthetic significance of ‘resonating’(p. 139), one organized around the metaphysics of pictures, and one charged with defending the implausible claim that the artistic representation of violence is uniquely capable of revealing ‘what is violent about violence’ (p. 191). But (...)
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  20. Chad Carmichael (2013). The Universe As We Find It, by John Heil. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2013.score: 146.0
    In this ambitious work, John Heil presents a fundamental ontology (chapters 1-8) consisting of finitely many substances and their properties (which he thinks of as particular, trope-like things), together with an account of causation, truthmaking, and a chapter on relations generally. He then applies this ontology (chapters 9-12) to a number of outstanding problems about reductionism, kinds, essences, emergence, consciousness, cognition, and much else. A final chapter reprises the main points about fundamental ontology from the first chapters.
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  21. Allison Merrick (2013). Nietzsche and the Necessity of Freedom by John Mandalios (Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (1):132-134.score: 146.0
    It is widely assumed that there may be a tension in Nietzsche’s views concerning freedom. In particular, Nietzsche seems to deny certain views of free will (GM I:13) and warns against “the hundred-times-refuted theory of ‘free will’” (BGE 18). Nevertheless, he also appears to admire the sovereign individual––“the man who has his own independent, protracted will,” “this master of a free will” (GM II:2)––as well as those who have forged a “free spirit” (GS 347). John Mandalios’s Nietzsche and the (...)
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  22. Charles Pigden (1996). Review of Why Be Moral? : The Egoistic Challenge by John van Ingen. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 74 (4).score: 146.0
    Van Ingen's aim aim is to vindicate the moral life by mounting and then meeting a powerful challenge. But he makes it so easy to be moral - it is enough to care about one other person - and so tough to be amoral - it involves being absolutely selfish - that his challenge is no challenge at all. It's not much of a vindication of morality if the morality you vindicate makes Tony Soprano a moral person.
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  23. John P. Ferre (1995). A 'Great Man' Approach: A Book Review by John P. Ferre. [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 10 (1):55 – 56.score: 146.0
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  24. Mark Sagoff (2014). Climate Matters: Ethics in a Warming World, by John Broome. [REVIEW] Mind 123 (489):194-197.score: 146.0
    Review of John Broome's overview of climate ethics.
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  25. Varol Akman, John McCarthy, Formalizing Common Sense: Papers by John McCarthy.score: 146.0
    This is a review of the above title published by Ablex Publishing Corporation, Norwood, New Jersey, 1990; vi + 256 pages, hardback, ISBN 0{89391{535{1 (Library of Congress: Q335.M38 1989), edited by Vladimir Lifschitz.
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  26. John R. Williams (2007). Globalization and Catholic Social Thought: Present Crisis, Future Hope. Edited by John A. Coleman and William F. Ryan. Heythrop Journal 48 (2):338–340.score: 146.0
  27. John Wilhelm Wurzer (2002). Enigmatic Sayings. Review of the Hypocritical Imagination: Between Kant and Levinas by John Llewelyn. Research in Phenomenology 32 (1):233-237.score: 146.0
  28. John Kinsey (2012). The Human Condition – By John Kekes; Why Believe? – By John Cottingham. Philosophical Investigations 35 (1):88-94.score: 146.0
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  29. John Kinsey (2008). The Spiritual Dimension: Religion, Philosophy and Human Value – by John Cottingham. Philosophical Investigations 31 (2):191–194.score: 146.0
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  30. John O. Omachonu (1995). The Theoretical Capacity: A Book Review by John O. Omachonu. [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 10 (1):54.score: 146.0
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  31. John Sisko (2012). Parmenides and Presocratic Philosophy. By John Palmer. Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):407-415.score: 146.0
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  32. John P. Ferre (1991). Book Review: Toward a History of Journalism Ethics: An Essay Review by John P. Ferre. [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 6 (3):182 – 187.score: 146.0
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  33. Kipton E. Jensen (2013). John Dewey's Philosophy of Spirit by John R. Shook and James A. Good (Review). The Pluralist 8 (1):129-137.score: 146.0
    The recent publication of Dewey's seminar lectures on Hegel's philosophy of spirit, which he delivered in Chicago in 1897, contributes significantly to the ongoing task of more accurately appreciating the confluence of historical influences that shaped the trajectory of classical American philosophy. Dewey's 1897 Hegel lectures are situated within their philosophical context by two seminal essays describing the relevance of recent scholarship to the philosophical or historical question of Dewey's ambivalent indebtedness to Hegel. In their essays, Shook and Good emphasize (...)
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  34. John J. Jenkins (1972). Locke and the Compass of Human Understanding. By John W. Yolton. Cambridge University Press. 1970. Pp. 234 + X. Price £3. [REVIEW] Philosophy 47 (179):82-.score: 146.0
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  35. John Laird (1927). The Making of the Modern Mind. By John H. Randall Jr., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Columbia University. (London: George Allen & Unwin, Ltd. 1927. Pp. X + 653. Price 15s. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 2 (07):402-.score: 146.0
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  36. John Laird (1935). The Philosophy of Communism. By John Macmurray . (London: Faber and Faber, Ltd. 1933. Pp. 96. Price 3s. 6d.). Philosophy 10 (40):482-.score: 146.0
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  37. John H. Mcmanus (1997). Book Review: Questions of Media Power: A Book Review by John H. McManus. [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 12 (3):186 – 189.score: 146.0
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  38. Paul Vincent Spade, Three Questions by John of Wesel on Obligationes and Insolubilia.score: 146.0
    The manuscript Venice, Biblioteca Nazionale Marciana, Class XI n. 12, Zanetti Latini 301 (= 1576), contains on fols. 1r–24v a seemingly unique copy of a series of fifteen logical questions, ten on obligationes and the remaining five on insolubilia.1 The series on obligationes is untitled and unattributed in the manuscript, but the questions on insolubilia begin (fol. 18r11) “Incipiunt quaestiones super insolubilibus,” and are attributed at the end to a certain John of Wesel (fol. 24v41): “Ergo expletae sunt quaestiones (...)
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  39. John R. Williams (2013). Placing Nature on the Borders of Religion, Philosophy and Ethics (Transcending Boundaries in Philosophy and Theology). Edited by Forrest Clingerman and Mark H. Dixon . Pp. Xiv, 224, Farnham, Surrey, Ashgate, 2011, £50.00. Turning Images in Philosophy, Science, & Religion: A New Book of Nature. Edited by Charles Taliaferro and Jil Evans . Pp. Xii, 256, Oxford University Press, 2011, £30.00/$50.00. The Singing Heart of the World: Creation, Evolution and Faith. By John Feehan. Pp. 204, Dublin, Columba Press, 2010, €14.99/£12.99. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 54 (4):706-708.score: 146.0
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  40. John Edwards (2003). Justice as Fairness: A Restatement by John Rawls Edited by Erin Kelly. Philosophy of Management 3 (1):63-64.score: 146.0
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  41. Guillaume Fréchette (forthcoming). Alessandro Salice (Ed.), Intentionality. Historical and Systematic Perspectives. With a Foreword by John R. Searle. Husserl Studies:1-5.score: 146.0
    This volume presents thirteen essays on intentionality, with a strong focus on historical issues—nine articles deal with the concepts of intentionality in Spinoza, Leibniz, Bolzano, Brentano, Marty, Husserl, and Pfänder—but also taking into consideration some contemporary issues about intentionality, especially from the perspective of externalism and on the question of collective intentionality. The wide variety of topics, historical periods, and perspectives presented in this volume bears witness to the fact that intentionality is widely acknowledged as a central phenomenon in philosophy (...)
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  42. John Teehan (1996). American Philosophic Naturalism in the Twentieth Century. Edited by John Ryder. Metaphilosophy 27 (4):426-432.score: 146.0
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  43. John Hick (1970). Experience and God. By John E. Smith. (Oxford University Press, 1968. Pp. 209. 40s 6d). Philosophy 45 (171):74-.score: 146.0
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  44. John P. Ferre (1998). The American View: A Book Review by John P. Ferre. [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 13 (3):196-198.score: 146.0
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  45. John L. Treloar (1977). "God and Creatures: The Quodlibetal Questions," by John Duns Scotus, Trans., with Introduction, Notes, and Glossary by Felix Alluntis, O.F.M., and Allan B. Wolter, O.F.M. [REVIEW] Modern Schoolman 54 (3):301-301.score: 146.0
  46. John W. Yolton (1968). Animal Faith and Spiritual Life. Previously Unpublished and Uncollected Writings of George Santayana with Critical Essays on His Thought. Edited by John Lachs. New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts, New York, 1967. Pp. Ix + 470. $3.95. [REVIEW] Dialogue 7 (01):129-131.score: 146.0
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  47. René Descartes & John Veitch, Discourse on the Method of Rightly Conducting the Reason, and Seeking Truth in the Sciences. Tr. From the French and Collated with the Latin by John Veitch. Authorized Reprint. [REVIEW]score: 146.0
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  48. John P. Doyle (1973). "Cajetan's Notion of Existence," by John P. Reilly. Modern Schoolman 51 (1):73-74.score: 146.0
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  49. John R. Bowlin (2000). Comment by John R. Bowlin. Journal of Religious Ethics 28 (3):473-477.score: 146.0
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  50. John Burk (2010). God's Joust, God's Justice: Law and Religion in the Western Tradition. By John Witte, Jr., Reaping the Whirlwind: Liberal Democracy & The Religious Axis. By John R. Pottenger and A Theology of Public Life. By Charles Matthewes. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 51 (4):690-693.score: 146.0
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