Search results for 'By Kristie Miller' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Peter Miller (1998). Richard M. Miller, Casuistry and Modern Ethics: A Poetics of Practical Reasoning Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 18 (2):132-134.score: 1260.0
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  2. By Kristie Miller (2008). Endurantism, Diachronic Vagueness and the Problem of the Many. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 89 (2):242–253.score: 870.0
    A plausible desideratum for an account of the nature of objects, at, and across time, is that it accommodate the phenomenon of vagueness without locating vagueness in the world. A series of arguments have attempted to show that while universalist perdurantism – which combines a perdurantist account of persistence with an unrestricted mereological account of composition – meets this desideratum, endurantist accounts do not. If endurantists reject unrestricted composition then they must hold that vagueness is ontological. But if they embrace (...)
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  3. Kristie Miller (2013). A. A. Rini and M. J. Cresswell, The World-Time Parallel. Tense and Modality in Logic and Metaphysics. Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 33 (1):70-73.score: 810.0
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  4. Charles Weijer & Paul B. Miller (2007). Refuting the Net Risks Test: A Response to Wendler and Miller's "Assessing Research Risks Systematically". Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (8):487-490.score: 600.0
    Earlier in the pages of this journal (p 481), Wendler and Miller offered the "net risks test" as an alternative approach to the ethical analysis of benefits and harms in research. They have been vocal critics of the dominant view of benefit-harm analysis in research ethics, which encompasses core concepts of duty of care, clinical equipoise and component analysis. They had been challenged to come up with a viable alternative to component analysis which meets five criteria. The alternative must (...)
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  5. Sam Baron, Richard Coltheart, Raamy Majeed & Kristie Miller (2013). What is a Negative Property? Philosophy 88 (01):33-54.score: 540.0
    This paper seeks to differentiate negative properties from positive properties, with the aim of providing the groundwork for further discussion about whether there is anything that corresponds to either of these notions. We differentiate negative and positive properties in terms of their functional role, before drawing out the metaphysical implications of proceeding in this fashion. We show that if the difference between negative and positive properties tabled here is correct, then negative properties are metaphysically contentious entities, entities that many philosophers (...)
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  6. Kristie Miller (2009). Defending Contingentism in Metaphysics. Dialectica 63 (1):23-49.score: 450.0
    Metaphysics is supposed to tell us about the metaphysical nature of our world: under what conditions composition occurs; how objects persist through time; whether properties are universals or tropes. It is near orthodoxy that whichever of these sorts of metaphysical claims is true is necessarily true. This paper looks at the debate between that orthodox view and a recently emerging view that claims like these are contingent, by focusing on the metaphysical debate between monists and pluralists about concrete particulars. This (...)
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  7. David Braddon-Mitchell & Kristie Miller (2004). How to Be a Conventional Person. The Monist 87 (4):457 - 474.score: 450.0
    Recent work in personal identity has emphasized the importance of various conventions, or ‘person directed practices’ in the determination of personal identity. An interesting question arises as to whether we should think that there are any entities that have, in some interesting sense, conventional identity conditions. We think that the best way to understand such work about practices and conventions is the strongest and most radical. If these considerations are correct, persons are, on our view, conventional constructs: they are in (...)
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  8. Sam Baron, Peter Evans & Kristie Miller (2010). From Timeless Physical Theory to Timelessness. Humana.Mente 13:35-59.score: 450.0
    This paper addresses the extent to which both Julian Barbour‘s Machian formulation of general relativity and his interpretation of canonical quantum gravity can be called timeless. We differentiate two types of timelessness in Barbour‘s (1994a, 1994b and 1999c). We argue that Barbour‘s metaphysical contention that ours is a timeless world is crucially lacking an account of the essential features of time—an account of what features our world would need to have if it were to count as being one in which (...)
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  9. Kristie Miller (2008). Backwards Causation, Time, and the Open Future. Metaphysica 9 (2):173-191.score: 450.0
    Here are some intuitions we have about the nature of space and time. There is something fundamentally different about the past, present, and future. What is definitive of the past is that the past events are fixed. What is definitive of the future is that future events are not fixed. What is definitive of the present is that it marks the objective ontological border between the past and the future and, by doing so, instantiates a particularly salient phenomenological property of (...)
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  10. Sam Baron & Kristie Miller (forthcoming). Causation Sans Time. American Philosophical Quarterly.score: 450.0
    Is time necessary for causation? We argue that, given a counterfactual theory of causation, it is not. We defend this claim by considering cases of counterfactual dependence in quantum mechanics. These cases involve laws of nature that govern entanglement. These laws make possible the evaluation of causal counterfactuals between space-like separated entangled particles. There is, for the proponent of a counterfactual theory of causation, a possible world in which causation but not time exists that can be reached by ‘stripping out’ (...)
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  11. Kristie Miller (2006). Vagueness, Persistence and Indeterminate Identity. Erkenntnis 64 (2):223 - 230.score: 450.0
    I argue that for those who follow Evans in finding indeterminacy of de re identity statements problematic, ontic vagueness within a three-dimensionalist metaphysics will raise some problems that are not faced by the four-dimensionalist. For the types of strategies used to avoid de re indeterminacy within the context of ontic vagueness at-at-time, that is, spatial vagueness, are problematic within a three-dimensionalist framework when put to use within the context of ontic vagueness across-time, that is temporal vagueness.
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  12. Kristie Miller (2005). The Metaphysical Equivalence of Three and Four Dimensionalism. Erkenntnis 62 (1):91 - 117.score: 450.0
    I argue that two competing accounts of persistence, three and four dimensionalism, are in fact metaphysically equivalent. I begin by clearly defining three and four dimensionalism, and then I show that the two theories are intertranslatable and equally simple. Through consideration of a number of different cases where intuitions about persistence are contradictory, I then go on to show that both theories describe these cases in the same manner. Further consideration of some empirical issues arising from the theory of special (...)
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  13. Kristie Miller & David Braddon-Mitchell (2007). There Is No Simpliciter Simpliciter. Philosophical Studies 136 (2):249 - 278.score: 450.0
    This paper identifies problems with indexicalism and abverbialism about temporary intrinsic properties, and solves them by disentangling two senses in which a particular may possess a property simpliciter. The first sense is the one identified by adverbialists in which a particular possesses at all times the property as a matter of foundational metaphysical fact regardless of whether it is manifest. The second involves building on adverbialism to produce a semantics for property-manifestation according to which different members of a family of (...)
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  14. Kristie Miller (2010). Persons as Sui Generis Ontological Kinds: Advice to Exceptionists. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 81 (3):567-593.score: 450.0
    Many metaphysicians tell us that our world is one in which persisting objects are four-dimensionally extended in time, and persist by being partially present at each moment at which they exist. Many normative theorists tell us that at least some of our core normative practices are justified only if the relation that holds between a person at one time, and that person at another time, is the relation of strict identity. If these metaphysicians are right about the nature of our (...)
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  15. Kristie Miller (2013). “Personal Identity” Minus the Persons. Philosophical Studies 166 (1):91-109.score: 450.0
    This paper defends a version of strong conventionalism minus the ontological commitments of that view. It defends the claim that strictly speaking there are no persons, whilst explicating how to make sense of talk that is about (or purportedly about) persons, by appealing to features in common to conventionalist accounts of personal identity. This view has the many benefits of conventionalist accounts in being flexible enough to deal with problem cases, whilst also avoiding the various worries associated with the existence (...)
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  16. Kristie Lyn Miller (2006). Issues in Theoretical Diversity: Persistence, Composition, and Time. Springer.score: 450.0
    Our world is full of composite objects that persist through time: dogs, persons, chairs and rocks. But in virtue of what do a bunch of little objects get to compose some bigger object, and how does that bigger object persist through time? This book aims to answer these questions, but it does so by looking at accounts of composition and persistence through a new methodological lens. It asks the question: what does it take for two theories to be genuinely different, (...)
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  17. David Braddon-Mitchell & Kristie Miller (2006). Talking About a Universalist World. Philosophical Studies 130 (3):499 - 534.score: 450.0
    The paper defends a combination of perdurantism with mereological universalism by developing semantics of temporary predications of the sort ’some P is/was/will be (a) Q’. We argue that, in addition to the usual application of causal and other restrictions on sortals, the grammatical form of such statements allows for rather different regimentations along three separate dimensions, according to: (a) whether ‘P’ and ‘Q’ are being used as phase or substance sortal terms, (b) whether ‘is’, ‘was’, and ‘will be’ are (...)
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  18. Kristie Miller (2013). Properties in a Contingentist's Domain. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 94 (2):225-245.score: 450.0
    This article attempts to make sense of property contingentism, the view that the metaphysical nature of properties is contingent. That is, it is contingent whether properties are universals or tropes or some other kind of entity. The article argues that even if one thinks that necessities are exhausted by conceptual truths and a posteriori necessities, the sort of methodology that can lead one to endorse contingentism in various domains in metaphysics does not give us good grounds to suppose that the (...)
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  19. Kristie Miller (2006). Non-Mereological Universalism. European Journal of Philosophy 14 (3):404–422.score: 450.0
    In this paper I develop a version of universalism that is non-mereological. Broadly speaking, non-mereological universalism is the thesis that for any arbitrary set of objects and times, there is a persisting object which, at each of those times, will be constituted by those of the objects that exist at that time. I consider two general versions of non-mereological universalism, one which takes basic simples to be enduring objects, and the other which takes simples to be instantaneous objects. This yields (...)
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  20. J. Bossaer, J. A. Gray, S. E. Miller, V. C. Gaddipati, R. E. Enck & G. G. Enck (2013). The Use (and Misuse) of 'Cognitive Enhancers' by Students at an Academic Health Sciences Center. Academic Medicine (7):967-971.score: 420.0
    Purpose Prescription stimulant use as “cognitive enhancers” has been described among undergraduate college students. However, the use of prescription stimulants among future health care professionals is not well characterized. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of prescription stimulant misuse among students at an academic health sciences center. -/- Method Electronic surveys were e-mailed to 621 medical, pharmacy, and respiratory therapy students at East Tennessee State University for four consecutive weeks in fall 2011. Completing the survey was voluntary and (...)
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  21. Warner Allen Miller (1986). The Geometrodynamic Content of the Regge Equations as Illuminated by the Boundary of a Boundary Principle. Foundations of Physics 16 (2):143-169.score: 420.0
    In this paper the principle that the boundary of a boundary is identically zero (∂○∂≡0) is applied to a skeleton geometry. It is shown that the left-hand side of the Regge equation may be interpreted geometrically as the sum of the moments of rotation associated with the faces of a polyhedral domain. Here the polyhedron, warped though it may be, is located in a lattice dual to the original skeleton manifold. This sum is related to the amount of energy-momentum (E-p) (...)
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  22. Jon Charles Miller (2012). A Treatisevs.An Enquiry: Omissions and Distortions by the New Humeans. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (5):1015-1026.score: 420.0
    There is a definite stress on the primacy of An Enquiry concerning Human Understanding over A Treatise of Human Nature by the so-called New Humeans, who in turn, advocate the sceptical/causal realist interpretation of Hume's empiricism. This paper shows how there has been a deliberate attempt by them to omit and distort certain negative aspects of Hume's life in the belief that in order to accept their interpretations we must first acknowledge that, (1) the Enquiry is the superior text and, (...)
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  23. Laura Carlson, Marjorie Skubic, Jared Miller, Zhiyu Huo & Tatiana Alexenko (2014). Strategies for Human‐Driven Robot Comprehension of Spatial Descriptions by Older Adults in a Robot Fetch Task. Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (3):513-533.score: 420.0
    This contribution presents a corpus of spatial descriptions and describes the development of a human-driven spatial language robot system for their comprehension. The domain of application is an eldercare setting in which an assistive robot is asked to “fetch” an object for an elderly resident based on a natural language spatial description given by the resident. In Part One, we describe a corpus of naturally occurring descriptions elicited from a group of older adults within a virtual 3D home that simulates (...)
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  24. Kai J. Miller, Dora Hermes, Christopher J. Honey, Mohit Sharma, Rajesh P. N. Rao, Marcel Den Nijs, Eberhard E. Fetz, Terrence J. Sejnowski, Adam O. Hebb, Jeffrey G. Ojemann, Scott Makeig & Eric C. Leuthardt (2010). Dynamic Modulation of Local Population Activity by Rhythm Phase in Human Occipital Cortex During a Visual Search Task. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4:197.score: 420.0
    Brain rhythms are more than just passive phenomena in visual cortex. For the first time, we show that the physiology underlying brain rhythms actively suppresses and releases cortical areas on a second-to-second basis during visual processing. Furthermore, their influence is specific at the scale of individual gyri. We quantified the interaction between broadband spectral change and brain rhythms on a second-to-second basis in electrocorticographic (ECoG) measurement of brain surface potentials in five human subjects during a visual search task. Comparison of (...)
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  25. R. Miller (1973). The Use of Concrete and Abstract Concepts by Children and Adults. Cognition 2 (1):49-58.score: 420.0
    Tested the hypothesis that the younger the child the more perceptual and concrete are the concepts used. Differences were examined between children and adults (a) in using both concrete and abstract concepts as opposed to only one kind of concept, and (b) in using either concrete or abstract concepts for the 1st of 2 different kinds (concrete or abstract) of concepts. Equivalence tasks of a forced-choice type were employed to test the use of concrete and abstract concepts by 45 1st (...)
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  26. John Miller (2009). Critical Lessons: What Our Schools Should Teach - By Nel Noddings. British Journal of Educational Studies 57 (1):91-93.score: 420.0
    Critical Lessons: What Our Schools Should Teach. By Nel Noddings. Pp. 319. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 2006. $30 (US). ISBN 0-521-85188-2 (hbk).
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  27. Dan Miller (2010). Review of Slavoj Žižek and John Milbank's, the Monstrosity of Christ: Paradox or Dialectic? Edited by Creston Davis. [REVIEW] Sophia 49 (1):165-167.score: 360.0
    The Monstrosity of Christ provides an exchange between the Slovenian theorist Slavoj Žižek and the British theologian John Milbank. Both authors argue that Christianity is the religion of ‘absolute truth,’ but provide very different accounts of this. Milbank argues that Christianity is true insofar as only the incarnation of Christ mediates the paradoxical metaphysical participation of the finite within the infinite. Žižek argues that the crucifixion of Christ constitutes the death of God, demonstrating that there is no providential or transcendent (...)
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  28. Bradley W. Miller (2007). Review Essay: A Common Law Theory of Judicial Review by WJ Waluchow. American Journal of Jurisprudence 52.score: 360.0
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  29. Mara Miller (2009). Review of The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure, and Human Evolution by Dutton, Denis. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 67 (3):333-336.score: 360.0
  30. David Miller (2010). Reviews Unity, Truth and the Liar. The Modern Relevance of Medieval Solutions to the Liar Paradox . Edited by Shahid Rahman, Tero Tulenheimo, & Emmanuel Genot. Springer Verlag, 2008, Pp. XXIV+333, €160.45. [REVIEW] Philosophy 85 (3):433-436.score: 360.0
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  31. D. Miller (2010). Philosophy, Politics, Democracy * by Joshua Cohen. Analysis 71 (1):202-204.score: 360.0
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  32. David Miller (1988). The Rationality of Induction By D. C. Stove Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1986, 231 Pp., £22.50. [REVIEW] Philosophy 63 (244):286-.score: 360.0
  33. Jason S. Miller (2010). Our Stories: Essays on Life, Death, and Free Will by John Martin Fischer. Analysis 70 (1):196-198.score: 360.0
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  34. Geoffrey Miller (2008). Futility by Any Other Name. The Texas 10 Day Rule. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (4):265-270.score: 360.0
    This commentary examines the ethics and law in the United States as they relate to the foregoing of life sustaining treatment when such treatment is deemed medically inappropriate. In particular the article highlights the procedural approach when there is disagreement between physicians and surrogates or patients as exemplified in Texas Law. This approach, although worthy in concept, may in practice invite opposition and dissatisfaction as it may be perceived as coercive and pitting the weak against powerful adversaries and interests, in (...)
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  35. Mara Miller (2007). A Philosophy of Gardens by Cooper, David E. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65 (4):430–432.score: 360.0
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  36. Glen Miller & Qin Zhu (2011). Dao Ji Zhijian: Zhongguo Wenhua Beijing de Jishu Zhexue «道技之间: 中国文化背景的技术哲学»– By Wang Qian. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (2):317-320.score: 360.0
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  37. James B. Miller (2012). Haunted by the Ghost in the Machine. Commentary on “The Spirituality of Human Consciousness: A Catholic Evaluation of Some Current Neuro-Scientific Interpretations”. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (3):503-507.score: 360.0
    Metaphysical and epistemological dualism informs much contemporary discussion of the relationships of science and religion, in particular in relation to the neurosciences and the religious understanding of the human person. This dualism is a foundational artifact of modern culture; however, contemporary scientific research and historical theological scholarship encourage a more holistic view wherein human personhood is most fittingly understood as an emergent phenomenon of, but not simply reducible to, evolutionary and developmental neurobiology.
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  38. David Miller (1974). On the Comparison of False Theories by Their Bases. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 25 (2):178-188.score: 360.0
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  39. Franklin G. Miller & Robert D. Truog (2009). The Incoherence of Determining Death by Neurological Criteria: A Commentary on Controversies in the Determination of Death, A White Paper by the President's Council on Bioethics. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (2):185-193.score: 360.0
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  40. Jon Miller, Reviewed By.score: 360.0
    Ian Hacking is one of the most original and influential thinkers alive today. His Taming of Chance (Cambridge UP, 1990) was named to The Modern Library’s list of the 100 most important non-fiction books written in English since 1900. In 2001, he was the first Anglophone ever to be elected to a permanent chair at the Collège de France. Though he started in highly technical fields such as logic, statistical theory and formal philosophy of science, he soon moved on to (...)
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  41. Mara Miller (1997). Review of English Gardens by David Coffin. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 55 (3):333-334.score: 360.0
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  42. Christian Miller (2013). God and Moral Law: On the Theistic Explanation of Morality. By Mark C. Murphy. (Oxford UP, 2011. Pp. X + 192. Price £35.00.). [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 63 (251):398-400.score: 360.0
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  43. Peter Miller (1974). On Justifying Moral Judgments. By Lawrence C. Becker. (International Library of Philosophy and Scientific Method.) New York: Humanities Press. 1973. Pp. Xii, 199. $10.50. [REVIEW] Dialogue 13 (02):396-398.score: 360.0
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  44. Franklin G. Miller & Robert D. Truog (2009). The Incoherence of Determining Death by Neurological Criteria: Reply to John Lizza. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (4):397-399.score: 360.0
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  45. Harvey Friedman, Krzysztof Kurdyka, Chris Miller & Patrick Speissegger (2010). Expansions of the Real Field by Open Sets: Definability Versus Interpretability. Journal of Symbolic Logic 75 (4):1311-1325.score: 360.0
    An open U ⊆ ℝ is produced such that (ℝ, +, ·, U) defines a Borel isomorph of (ℝ, +, ·, ℕ) but does not define ℕ. It follows that (ℝ, +, ·, U) defines sets in every level of the projective hierarchy but does not define all projective sets. This result is elaborated in various ways that involve geometric measure theory and working over o-minimal expansions of (ℝ, +, ·). In particular, there is a Cantor set E ⊆ ℝ (...)
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  46. Lee A. Miller & Annemarie Surlykke (2001). How Some Insects Detect and Avoid Being Eaten by Bats: Tactics and Countertactics of Prey and Predator Evolutionarily Speaking, Insects Have Responded to Selective Pressure From Bats with New Evasive Mechanisms, and These Very Responses in Turn Put Pressure on Bats to “Improve” Their Tactics. BioScience 51 (7):570-581.score: 360.0
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  47. Dale E. Miller (2014). Jonathan Haidt, The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion (New York: Pantheon, 2012), Pp. Xvii + 419. [REVIEW] Utilitas 26 (1):124-127.score: 360.0
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  48. Corey Miller (2013). The Second-Person Perspective in Aquinas's Ethics: Virtues and Gifts. By Andrew Pinsent. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 87 (1):207-211.score: 360.0
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  49. Leonard G. Miller (1971). Demons, Dreamers, and Madmen: The Defense of Reason in Descartes' Meditations. By Harry G. Frankfurt. Indianapolis and New York: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, Inc., 1970. Pp. Ix, 193. $7.95. [REVIEW] Dialogue 10 (04):839-843.score: 360.0
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  50. J. T. M. Miller (2013). Eli Hirsch , Quantifier Variance and Realism: Essays in Metaontology . Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 33 (6):464-467.score: 360.0
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