Search results for 'By Michael Ridge' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Michael Ridge (2014). Impassioned Belief. Oup Oxford.score: 1230.0
    Michael Ridge presents an original expressivist theory of normative judgments--Ecumenical Expressivism--which offers distinctive treatments of key problems in metaethics, semantics, and practical reasoning. He argues that normative judgments are hybrid states partly constituted by ordinary beliefs and partly constituted by desire-like states.
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  2. Michael Ridge, Michael A. Smith.score: 720.0
    Back in the bad old days, it was easy enough to spot non-cognitivists. They pressed radical doctrines with considerable bravado. Intoxicated by the apparent implications of logical positivism, early noncognitivsts would say things like, "in saying that a certain type of action is right or wrong, I am not making any factual statement..." (Ayer 1936: 107) Like most rebellious youths, non-cognitivism eventually grew up. Later non-cognitivists developed the position into a more subtle doctrine, no longer committed to the revisionary doctrines (...)
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  3. Michael Ridge (2003). Judith Jarvis Thomson, Goodness and Advice, Edited by Amy Gutmann:Goodness and Advice. Ethics 113 (2):447-450.score: 630.0
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  4. Michael Ridge (2007). Anti-Reductionism and Supervenience. Journal of Moral Philosophy 4 (3):330-348.score: 450.0
    In this paper, I argue that anti-reductionist moral realism still has trouble explaining supervenience. My main target here will be Russ Shafer-Landau's attempt to explain the supervenience of the moral on the natural in terms of the constitution of moral property instantiations by natural property instantiations. First, though, I discuss a recent challenge to the very idea of using supervenience as a dialectical weapon posed by Nicholas Sturgeon. With a suitably formulated supervenience thesis in hand, I try to show how (...)
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  5. Michael Ridge (2001). Agent-Neutral Consequentialism From the Inside-Out: Concern for Integrity Without Self-Indulgence. Utilitas 13 (02):236-.score: 450.0
    Is there a justification of concern for one's own integrity that agent-neutral consequentialism cannot explain? In addressing this question, it is important to be clear about what is meant by 'agent-neutral', 'consequentialism', and 'integrity'. Let 'consequentialism' be constituted by the following two theses.
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  6. Michael Ridge (2004). Moral Realism: A Defence. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (3):540 – 544.score: 450.0
    Book Information Moral Realism: A Defence. Moral Realism: A Defence Russ Shafer-Landau , Oxford : Clarendon Press , 2003 , x + 322 , £35 ( cloth ) By Russ Shafer-Landau. Clarendon Press. Oxford. Pp. x + 322. £35 (cloth:).
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  7. Michael Ridge (2006). Sincerity and Expressivism. Philosophical Studies 131 (2):487 - 510.score: 450.0
    What is it for a speech-act to be sincere? A very tempting answer, defended by John Searle and others, is that a speech-act is sincere just in case the speaker has the state of mind it expresses. I argue that we should instead hold that a speech-act is sincere just in case the speaker believes that she has the state of mind she believes it expresses (Sections 1 and 2). Scenarios in which speakers are deluded about their own states of (...)
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  8. Michael Ridge (2005). The Many Moral Particularisms. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 35 (1):83 - 106.score: 450.0
    What place, if any, moral principles should or do have in moral life has been a longstanding question for moral philosophy. For some, the proposition that moral philosophy should strive to articulate moral principles has been an article of faith. At least since Aristotle, however, there has been a rich counter-tradition that questions the possibility or value of trying to capture morality in principled terms. In recent years, philosophers who question principled approaches to morality have argued under the banner of (...)
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  9. Michael Ridge (2003). Epistemology Moralized: David Hume's Practical Epistemology. Hume Studies 29 (2):165-204.score: 450.0
    - Peter Railton1 Railton's remark is accurate; contemporary philosophers almost invariably suppose that morality is more vulnerable than empirical science to scepticism. Yet David Hume apparently embraces an inversion of this twentieth century orthodoxy.2 In book I of the Treatise, he claims that the understanding, when it reflects upon itself, "entirely subverts itself" (T 1. 4.7.7; SBN 267) while, in contrast, in book III he claims that our moral faculty, when reflecting upon itself, acquires "new force" (T 3.3.6.3; SBN 619). (...)
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  10. Michael Ridge (2012). David Hume, Paternalist. Hume Studies 36 (2):149-170.score: 450.0
    Were there a species of creatures intermingled with men, which, though rational, were possessed of such inferior strength, both of body and mind, that they were incapable of all resistance, and could never, upon the highest provocation, make us feel the effects of their resentment; the necessary consequence, I think, is that we should be bound by the laws of humanity to give gentle usage to these creatures, but should not, properly speaking, lie under any restraint of justice with regard (...)
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  11. Michael Ridge (2006). Introducing Variable-Rate Rule-Utilitarianism. Philosophical Quarterly 56 (223):242 - 253.score: 450.0
    The basic idea of rule-utilitarianism is that right action should be defined in terms of what would be required by rules which would maximize either actual or expected utility if those rules gained general acceptance, or perhaps general compliance. Rule-utilitarians face a dilemma. They must characterize 'general acceptance' either as 100% acceptance, or as something less. On the first horn of the dilemma, rule-utilitarianism in vulnerable to the charge of utopianism; on the second, it is open to the charge of (...)
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  12. Michael Ridge, Scanlon, Permissions, and Redundancy: Response to McNaughton and Rawling.score: 450.0
    According to one formulation of <span class='Hi'>Scanlon</span>’s contractualist principle, certain acts are wrong if they are permitted by principles that are reasonably rejectable because they permit such acts. According to the redundancy objection, if a principle is reasonably rejectable because it permits actions which have feature F, such actions are wrong simply in virtue of having F and not because their having F makes principles permitting them reasonably rejectable. Consequently <span class='Hi'>Scanlon</span>’s contractualist principle adds nothing to the reasons we have (...)
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  13. Michael Ridge (2009). The Truth in Ecumenical Expressivism. In David Sobel & Steven Wall (eds.), Reasons for Action. Cambridge University Press.score: 450.0
    Early expressivists, such as A.J. Ayer, argued that normative utterances are not truth-apt, and many found this striking claim implausible. After all, ordinary speakers are perfectly happy to ascribe truth and falsity to normative assertions. It is hard to believe that competent speakers could be so wrong about the meanings of their own language, particularly as these meanings are fixed by the conventions implicit in their own linguistic behavior. Later expressivists therefore tried to arrange a marriage between expressivism and the (...)
     
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  14. Michael Ridge (2005). Universalizability for Collective Rational Agents: A Critique of Agentrelativism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (1):34–66.score: 450.0
    Kantians argue that any sound theory of practical reason must be universalizable. Their opponents argue that insofar as universalizability is hedged enough to be defensible it is an "empty formalism." The critic presents the Kantian with a dilemma. They argue that if the only notion of a contradiction in play in the categorical imperative is simply that of logical one (as opposed to some sort of practical or teleological contradiction)1 then the categorical imperative it too anemic to have interesting consequences. (...)
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  15. Michael Ridge, How to Be a Rule-Utilitarian: Introducing Variable-Rate Rule-Utilitarianism.score: 450.0
    Rule-utilitarianism, in spite of its considerable attractions, is a theory in need of a plausible and precise formulation. The basic idea behind rule-utilitarianism is that right action should be defined in terms of what would be required by rules which would maximise either actual or expected utility if those rules gained general acceptance or (on some versions of the theory) general compliance. Rule-utilitarians differ over whether acceptance or compliance is the key notion (see Hooker 2000: 75-80) and also over whether (...)
     
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  16. Michael Ridge (2005). Why Must We Threat Humanity with Respect? Evaluating the Regress Argument. European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 1 (1):57-73.score: 450.0
    -- Immanuel Kant (Kant 1990, p. 46/429) The idea that our most basic duty is to treat each other with respect is one of the Enlightenment’s greatest legacies and Kant is often thought to be one of its most powerful defenders. If Kant’s project were successful then the lofty notion that humanity is always worthy of respect would be vindicated by pure practical reason. Further, this way of defending the ideal is supposed to reflect our autonomy, insofar as it is (...)
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  17. Stephen Darwall, George Sher, Michael Ridge, François Schroeter & Christian List (2006). 10. Philip Pettit, Samuel Scheffler, and Michael Smith, Eds., Reason and Value: Themes From the Moral Philosophy of Joseph Raz Philip Pettit, Samuel Scheffler, and Michael Smith, Eds., Reason and Value: Themes From the Moral Philosophy of Joseph Raz (Pp. 435-440). [REVIEW] Ethics 116 (2).score: 420.0
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  18. Ira Singer (2011). Principled Ethics: Generalism as a Regulative Ideal. By Sean McKeever and Michael Ridge. Metaphilosophy 42 (1-2):170-177.score: 261.0
  19. Nancy E. Schauber (2008). Principled Ethics: Generalism as a Regulative Ideal - by Sean McKeever and Michael Ridge. Philosophical Books 49 (2):181-182.score: 261.0
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  20. Paul Richard Blum, Michael Polanyi: Can the Mind Be Represented by a Machine? Existence and Anthropology.score: 108.0
    On the 27th of October, 1949, the Department of Philosophy at the University of Manchester organized a symposium "Mind and Machine", as Michael Polanyi noted in his Personal Knowledge (1974, p. 261). This event is known, especially among scholars of Alan Turing, but it is scarcely documented. Wolfe Mays (2000) reported about the debate, which he personally had attended, and paraphrased a mimeographed document that is preserved at the Manchester University archive. He forwarded a copy to Andrew Hodges and (...)
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  21. Hans S. Reinders (1999). Response to “Euthanasia and Health Reform in Canada” by Michael Stingl (CQ Vol 7, No 4). Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (02):238-240.score: 108.0
    Michael Stingl's sensitive paper links two debates now dominating contemporary Western societies: the debate on euthanasia and the debate on healthcare reform. The link is important for both practical and theoretical reasons. Given the rise of national expenditures for healthcare, most governments have a strong interest in cost containment. In various countries we see reduced accessibility to healthcare services and facilities, albeit for different reasons. Sometimes healthcare is largely a matter of private insurance, as in the United States; sometimes (...)
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  22. Jacob L. Goodson (2013). William James on Ethics and Faith by Michael R. Slater (Review). American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 34 (3):285-288.score: 108.0
    Through an analysis and explication of William James’s writings, such as “The Moral Philosopher and the Moral Life” and The Varieties of Religious Experience, Michael Slater successfully defends the argument “that on James’s view morality cannot be finally separated from religion, because there are moral goods that only religious faith—and in some cases, only the objects of religious faith—can plausibly bring about” (7). Slater advances this argument by making two significant claims concerning James’s work. First, James’s ethics require “the (...)
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  23. By Michael Ridge (2006). Introducing Variable-Rate Rule-Utilitarianism. Philosophical Quarterly 56 (223):242–253.score: 96.0
    The basic idea of rule-utilitarianism is that right action should be defined in terms of what would be required by rules which would maximize either actual or expected utility if those rules gained general acceptance, or perhaps general compliance. Rule-utilitarians face a dilemma. They must characterize 'general acceptance' either as 100% acceptance, or as something less. On the first horn of the dilemma, rule-utilitarianism in vulnerable to the charge of utopianism; on the second, it is open to the charge of (...)
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  24. Phillip Aspinall (2014). My Ecumenical Journey by Bishop Michael Putney. Australasian Catholic Record, The 91 (2):227.score: 96.0
    Aspinall, Phillip This volume is a collection of essays, papers presented and talks on ecumenism and interfaith relations by Bishop Michael Putney. Spanning the years 1977-2009, they represent thirty-two years of ecumenical endeavour.
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  25. Liz Wells (2003). Reflections on Experimental Film, on The Undercut Reader , Edited by Nina Danino and Michael Maziere. Film-Philosophy 7 (7).score: 96.0
    _The Undercut Reader_ Edited by Nina Danino and Michael Maziere London: Wallflower Press, 2003 ISBN 1-903364-47-7 277 pp.
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  26. David Deutsch, Comment on 'Many Minds' Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics by Michael Lockwood”.score: 90.0
    At the philosophical foundations of our best and deepest theory of the structure of reality, namely quantum mechanics, there is an intellectual scandal that reflects badly on most of this century’s leading physicists and philosophers of physics. One way of making the nature of the scandal plain is simply to observe that this paper [1] by Lockwood is untainted by it. Lockwood gives us an up to date investigation of metaphysics, and discusses the implications of quantum theory for some of (...)
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  27. Michael Esfeld & Michael Sollberger (2008). Strukturale Repräsentation – by Andreas Bartels Subjektivität, Intersubjektivität, Personalität. Ein Beitrag Zur Philosophie der Person – by Christian Beyer Bilder Im Geiste. Die Imagery-Debatte – by Verena Gottschling der Blick Von Innen. Zur Transtemporalen Identität Bewusstseinsfähiger Wesen – by Martine Nida-Rümelin Illusion Freiheit? Mögliche Und Unmögliche Konsequenzen der Hirnforschung – by Michael Pauen Willensfreiheit Und Hirnforschung. Das Freiheitsmodell Des Epistemischen Libertarismus – by Bettina Walde der Mentale Zugang Zur Welt. Realismus, Skeptizismus Und Intentionalität – by Marcus Willaschek. [REVIEW] Dialectica 62 (1):128–135.score: 90.0
  28. C. Tappolet (2011). Truth as One and Many, by Michael P. Lynch. Mind 119 (476):1193-1198.score: 90.0
    For someone who is inclined towards truth monism and moral realism, reading this book is like journeying through a foreign country: somewhat disconcerting, but nonetheless enjoyable. Michael Lynch’s world is a stoutly naturalistic world, in which representation is conceived in terms of causal or teleological relations. This is a world in which it is hard to fit normative facts. Thus, the reader is told that there are good reasons to think that ‘moral properties, should they exist, would not be (...)
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  29. Michael Devitt, Reply by Michael Devitt — '(2007) Dodging the Argument on the Subject Matter of Grammars: A Reponse to John Collins and Peter Slezak' - (16/8/2007). (PDF). [REVIEW]score: 90.0
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  30. William Simkulet (2013). Essays on the History of Ethics by Michael Slote (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (3):500-501.score: 90.0
    In this book Michael Slote discusses the history of ethics from a sentimentalist perspective. It can be read in two ways: first, as a tribute to great thinkers whose contributions have helped shape contemporary ethics, and second, as a defense of a sentimentalist virtue theory. This review centers on the two chapters most relevant to sentimentalist virtue theory: chapter 1, in which Slote defines and defends elevationism, and chapter 5, in which he offers a defense of sentimentalism. The first (...)
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  31. Paul Fischer (2013). Dong Zhongshu: A 'Confucian' Heritage and the Chunqiu Fanlu by Michael Loewe (Review). Philosophy East and West 63 (2):306-308.score: 90.0
    In Dong Zhongshu: A 'Confucian' Heritage and the Chunqiu Fanlu, eminent sinologist Michael Loewe shines a bright light on the traditionally seminal but consistently understudied figure of Dong Zhongshu. Having authored several monographs on the Han dynasty over the last four decades, including a recent two-volume Biographical Dictionary (2000) and a "Companion" to those volumes (2004),1 there is probably no one more suitable to undertake such an inquiry. Loewe's contextualization of Dong and the Chunqiu fanlu is thoroughly detailed and (...)
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  32. Michael McGuckian (2009). Appropriating the Lonergan Idea. By Frederick E. Crowe, S.J., Edited by Michael Vertin. Heythrop Journal 50 (3):533-534.score: 90.0
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  33. Michael Gorr (1991). An Essay on Moral Responsibility, by Michael Zimmerman. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (3):713-716.score: 90.0
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  34. Michael T. McFall (2012). Wise Stewards: Philosophical Foundations of Christian Parenting, by Michael W. Austin. Faith and Philosophy 29 (3):368-372.score: 90.0
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  35. Michael Goldman (2013). "Morality and Global Justice: Justifications and Applications," by Michael Boylan; and "The Morality and Global Justice Reader," Ed. Michael Boylan. Teaching Philosophy 36 (1):77-82.score: 90.0
  36. Michael Ruse (1973). The Matter of Life: Philosophical Problems of Biology. By Michael A. Simon. New Haven and London: Yale University Press; Montreal: McGill - Queen's University Press. 1971. Pp. Xi, 258. $7.50. [REVIEW] Dialogue 12 (01):157-158.score: 90.0
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  37. W. Lewis (2002). “You Keep Telling Me What has Been Lost, and I Keep Telling You Something Remains.” A Personal Response To: Scar Tissue by Michael Ignatieff. Medical Humanities 28 (2):105-106.score: 90.0
    Michael Ignatieff is well known as a journalist and broadcaster of a distinctly intellectual kind. He has written movingly on the trauma of modern warfare and Europe following the Cold War. His CV also boasts of studies on the Scottish Enlightenment and nineteenth century penal policy. Additionally, his Booker short listed novel Scar Tissue is one of the most interesting studies of medicine and the human consequences of disease of the last decade.
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  38. Michael Kelly, Edgar Morin: Introduction (Special Issue Edited by Michael Kelly).score: 90.0
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  39. Michael Shermer, By Michael Shermer.score: 90.0
    Humans are pattern-seeking, storytelling animals. We look for and find patterns in our world and in our lives, then weave narratives around those patterns to bring them to life and give them meaning. Such is the stuff of which myth, religion, history, and science are made.
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  40. Michael Wyschogrod (2009). Sacred Attunement: A Jewish Theology – By Michael Fishbane. Modern Theology 25 (4):709-711.score: 90.0
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  41. Michael D. A. Freeman (ed.) (2008). Law and Bioethics / Edited by Michael Freeman. Oxford University Press.score: 90.0
     
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  42. Michael Fried (2005). Editorial Note: Two Poems by Michael Fried. Critical Inquiry 31 (3):747-748.score: 90.0
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  43. Michael Robertson (2009). Book Review: The Ethical Brain By Michael S. Gazzaniga. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics in Mental Health 1 (1):12.score: 90.0
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  44. Michael Tye (1982). A Causal Analysis of Seeing by Michael Tye. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 42 (March):311-325.score: 90.0
     
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  45. Uri D. Leibowitz (2014). Explaining Moral Knowledge. Journal of Moral Philosophy 11 (1):35-56.score: 87.0
    In this paper I assess the viability of a particularist explanation of moral knowledge. First, I consider two arguments by Sean McKeever and Michael Ridge that purport to show that a generalist, principle-based explanation of practical wisdom—understood as the ability to acquire moral knowledge in a wide range of situations—is superior to a particularist, non-principle-based account. I contend that both arguments are unsuccessful. Then, I propose a particularist-friendly explanation of knowledge of particular moral facts. I argue that when (...)
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  46. Brad Hooker & Guy Fletcher (2008). Variable Versus Fixed-Rate Rule-Utilitarianism. Philosophical Quarterly 58 (231):344–352.score: 87.0
    Fixed-rate versions of rule-consequentialism and rule-utilitarianism evaluate rules in terms of the expected net value of one particular level of social acceptance, but one far enough below 100% social acceptance to make salient the complexities created by partial compliance. Variable-rate versions of rule-consequentialism and rule-utilitarianism instead evaluate rules in terms of their expected net value at all different levels of social acceptance. Brad Hooker has advocated a fixed-rate version. Michael Ridge has argued that the variable-rate version is better. (...)
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  47. Luke Robinson (2008). Moral Principles Are Not Moral Laws. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 2 (3):1-22.score: 87.0
    What are moral principles? The assumption underlying much of the generalism–particularism debate in ethics is that they are (or would be) moral laws: generalizations or some special class thereof, such as explanatory or counterfactual-supporting generalizations. I argue that this law conception of moral principles is mistaken. For moral principles do at least three things that moral laws cannot do, at least not in their own right: explain certain phenomena, provide particular kinds of support for counterfactuals, and ground moral necessities, “necessary (...)
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  48. David Copp (2005). The Normativity of Self-Grounded Reason. Social Philosophy and Policy 22 (2):165-203.score: 87.0
    In this essay, I propose a standard of practical rationality and a grounding for the standard that rests on the idea of autonomous agency. This grounding is intended to explain the “normativity” of the standard. The basic idea is this: To be autonomous is to be self-governing. To be rational is at least in part to be self-governing; it is to do well in governing oneself. I argue that a person's values are aspects of her identity—of her “self-esteem identity”—in a (...)
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  49. Sean D. McKeever (2006). Principled Ethics: Generalism as a Regulative Ideal. Oxford University Press.score: 87.0
    Moral philosophy has long been dominated by the aim of understanding morality and the virtues in terms of principles. However, the underlying assumption that this is the best approach has received almost no defence, and has been attacked by particularists, who argue that the traditional link between morality and principles is little more than an unwarranted prejudice. In Principled Ethics, Michael Ridge and Sean McKeever meet the particularist challenge head-on, and defend a distinctive view they call "generalism as (...)
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