Search results for 'By Robert Schroer' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Robert Schroer (2012). Representationalism and the Scene-Immediacy of Visual Experience: A Journey to the Fringe and Back. Philosophical Psychology 25 (4):595 - 615.score: 1230.0
    Both visual experience and conscious thought represent external objects, but in visual experience these objects seem present before the mind and available for direct access in a way that they don?t in conscious thought. In this paper, I introduce a couple of challenges that this ?Scene-Immediacy? of visual experience raises for traditional versions of Representationalism. I then identify a resource to which Representationalists can appeal in addressing these challenges: the low-detail fringe of visual experience. I argue that low-detail contents within (...)
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  2. J. Robert & S. Whittle (1986). The Developmental Programme - Concept or Muddle?Programmes for Development, Genes, Chromosomes and Computer Models in Developmental Biology. Edited by Alma Swan, HERBERT Macgregor and Robert Ransom.J. Embryol. Exp. Morph. Volume 83 Supplement. The Company of Biologists Ltd, Cambridge, 1984. Pp. 369. �12.00, $23.00. [REVIEW] Bioessays 5 (2):91-92.score: 780.0
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  3. Robert Schroer (2002). Seeing It All Clearly: The Real Story on Blurry Vision. American Philosophical Quarterly 39 (3):297-301.score: 450.0
    Representationalism is the position that the phenomenal character of a perceptual experience supervenes upon its representational content. The phenomenon of blurry vision is thought to raise a difficulty for this position. More specifically, it is alleged that representationalists cannot account for the phenomenal difference between clearly seeing an indistinct edge and blurrily seeing a distinct edge solely in terms of represented features of the surrounding environment. I defend representationalism from this objection by offering a novel account of the phenomenal difference (...)
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  4. Robert Schroer (2008). Memory Foundationalism and the Problem of Unforgotten Carelessness. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 89 (1):74–85.score: 450.0
    According to memory foundationalism, seeming to remember that P is prima facie justification for believing that P. There is a common objection to this theory: If I previously believed that P carelessly (i.e. without justification) and later seem to remember that P, then (according to memory foundationalism) I have somehow acquired justification for a previously unjustified belief. In this paper, I explore this objection. I begin by distinguishing between two versions of it: One where I seem to remember that P (...)
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  5. Brendan O'Sullivan & Robert Schroer (2012). Painful Reasons: Representationalism as a Theory of Pain. Philosophical Quarterly 62 (249):737-758.score: 450.0
    It is widely thought that functionalism and the qualia theory are better positioned to accommodate the ‘affective’ aspect (i.e., the hurtfulness) of pain phenomenology than representationalism. In this paper, we attempt to overturn this opinion by raising problems for both functionalism and the qualia theory on this score. With regard to functionalism, we argue that it gets the order of explanation wrong: pain experience gives rise to the effects it does because it hurts, and not the other way around. With (...)
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  6. Robert Schroer (2010). How Far Can the Physical Sciences Reach? American Philosophical Quarterlly 47 (3):253-266.score: 450.0
    : It is widely thought that dispositional properties depend upon categorical properties; specifying the nature of this dependency, however, has proven a difficult task. The dependency of dispositional properties upon categorical properties also presents a challenge to the thesis of Physicalism: If the physical sciences only tell us about the dispositional properties of the objects they study and if dispositional properties depend upon categorical properties, then it appears that there will be kind of property—categorical properties—that will escape description by the (...)
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  7. Robert Schroer (2010). Is There More Than One Categorical Property? Philosophical Quarterly 60 (241):831-850.score: 450.0
    I develop a new theory of properties by considering two central arguments in the debate whether properties are dispositional or categorical. The first claims that objects must possess categorical properties in order to be distinct from empty space. The second argument, however, points out several untoward consequences of positing categorical properties. I explore these arguments and argue that despite appearances, their conclusions need not be in conflict with one another. In particular, we can view the second argument as supporting only (...)
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  8. Robert Schroer (2004). Environmental Representationalists on Afterimages and Phosphenes: Putting Our Best Foot Forward. Southern Journal of Philosophy 42 (4):531-546.score: 450.0
    Environmental representationalism is the position that phenomenal differences between visual experiences are determined by the representational claims those experiences make about the surrounding environment. Afterimage and phosphene experiences are an important and widely cited objection to this position. In this paper, I defend environmental representationalism from this objection. In particular, I point out several ways in which typical environmental representationalist accounts of these experiences are lacking while developing a more satisfying account which focuses on how the visual system generates its (...)
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  9. Robert Schroer (2010). Where's the Beef? Phenomenal Concepts as Both Demonstrative and Substantial. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (3):505-522.score: 450.0
    One popular materialist response to the explanatory gap identifies phenomenal concepts with type-demonstrative concepts. This kind of response, however, faces a serious challenge: that our phenomenal concepts seem to provide a richer characterization of their referents than just the demonstrative characterization of 'that quality'. In this paper, I develop a materialist account that beefs up the contents of phenomenal concepts while retaining the idea that these contents contain demonstrative elements. I illustrate this account by focusing on our phenomenal concepts of (...)
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  10. Jeanine Schroer & Robert Schroer (2013). Two Potential Problems with Philosophical Intuitions: Muddled Intuitions and Biased Intuitions. Philosophia 41 (4):1263-1281.score: 450.0
    One critique of experimental philosophy is that the intuitions of the philosophically untutored should be accorded little to no weight; instead, only the intuitions of professional philosophers should matter. In response to this critique, “experimentalists” often claim that the intuitions of professional philosophers are biased. In this paper, we explore this question of whose intuitions should be disqualified and why. Much of the literature on this issue focuses on the question of whether the intuitions of professional philosophers are reliable. In (...)
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  11. Robert Schroer (2009). Does the Phenomenality of Perceptual Experience Present an Obstacle to Phenomenal Externalism? Philosophical Papers 39 (1):93-110.score: 450.0
    : Although Externalism is widely accepted as a thesis about belief, as a thesis about experience it is both controversial and unpopular. One potential explanation of this difference involves the phenomenality of perceptual experience—perhaps there is something about how perceptual experiences seem that straightforwardly speaks against Externalist accounts of their individuation conditions. In this paper, I investigate this idea by exploring the role that the phenomenality of color experience plays in a prominent argument against Phenomenal Externalism: Ned Block’s Inverted Earth (...)
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  12. Robert Schroer (2007). Reticence of Visual Phenomenal Character: A Spatial Interpretation of Transparency. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 85 (3):393-414.score: 450.0
    It is often claimed that the phenomenal character of visual experience is 'transparent' in that the phenomenal features of visual experience do not seem 'mental'. It is then claimed that this transparency speaks in favour of some theories of experience while speaking against others. In this paper, I advance both a negative and a positive thesis about transparency. My negative thesis is that visual phenomenal character is reticent in that it does not reveal whether it is mental or non-mental in (...)
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  13. Robert Schroer (2013). Do the Primary and Secondary Intensions of Phenomenal Concepts Coincide in All Worlds? Dialectica 67 (4):561-577.score: 450.0
    A slew of conceivability arguments have been given against physicalism. Many physicalists try to undermine these arguments by offering accounts of phenomenal concepts that explain how there can be an epistemic gap, but not an ontological gap, between the phenomenal and the physical. Some complain, however, that such accounts fail to do justice to the nature of our introspective grasp of phenomenal properties. A particularly influential version of this complaint comes from David Chalmers (1996; 2003), who claims, in opposition to (...)
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  14. Robert Schroer (2002). Matching Sensible Qualities: A Skeleton in the Closet for Representationalism. Philosophical Studies 107 (3):259-73.score: 450.0
    The intransitivity of matching sensible qualities of color is a threat not only to the sense-data theory, but to all realist theories of sensible qualities, including the current leading realist theory: representationalism. I save representationalism from this threat by way of a novel yet empirically plausible hypothesis about the introspective classification of sensible qualities of color. I argue that due to limitations of the visual system's ability to extract fine-grained information about color from the environment, introspective classification of sensible qualities (...)
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  15. Robert Schroer (2008). The Woman in the Painting and the Image in the Penny: An Investigation of Phenomenological Doubleness, Seeing-in, and “Reversed Seeing-In”. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 139 (3):329 - 341.score: 450.0
    The experience of looking at a tilted penny involves a “phenomenological doubleness” in that it simultaneously seems to be of something circular and of something elliptical. In this paper, I investigate the phenomenological doubleness of this experience by comparing it to another case of phenomenological doubleness––the phenomenological doubleness of seeing an object in a painting. I begin by pointing out some striking similarities between the phenomenological characters of these two experiences. I then argue that these phenomenological characters have a common (...)
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  16. Robert Schroer (2013). Can a Single Property Be Both Dispositional and Categorical? The “Partial Consideration Strategy”, Partially Considered. Metaphysica 14 (1):63-77.score: 450.0
    One controversial position in the debate over dispositional and categorical properties maintains that our concepts of these properties are the result of partially considering unitary properties that are both dispositional and categorical. As one of its defenders (Heil 2005, p. 351) admits, this position is typically met with “incredulous stares”. In this paper, I examine whether such a reaction is warranted. This thesis about properties is an instance of what I call “the Partial Consideration Strategy”—i.e., the strategy of claiming that (...)
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  17. Richmond Campbell & Jason Scott Robert (2005). The Structure of Evolution by Natural Selection. Biology and Philosophy 20 (4):673-696.score: 200.0
    We attempt a conclusive resolution of the debate over whether the principle of natural selection (PNS), especially conceived as the `principle' of the `survival of the fittest', is a tautology. This debate has been largely ignored for the past 15 years but not, we think, because it has actually been settled. We begin by describing the tautology objection, and situating the problem in the philosophical and biology literature. We then demonstrate the inadequacy of six prima facie plausible reasons for believing (...)
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  18. Isabelle Travis (2011). 'Is Getting Well Ever An Art?': Psychopharmacology and Madness in Robert Lowell's Day by Day. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (4):315-324.score: 144.0
    On the publication of Robert Lowell’s Life Studies in 1959, some critics were shocked by the poet’s use of seemingly frank autobiographical material, in particular the portrayal of his hospitalizations for bipolar disorder. During the late fifties and throughout the sixties, a rich vein, influenced by Lowell , developed in American poetry. Also during this time, the nascent science of psychopharmacology competed with and complemented the more established somatic treatments, such as psychosurgery, shock treatments, and psychoanalytical therapies. The development (...)
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  19. Robert F. Potter (1997). Book Review: Considering Moral Sensitivity in Media Ethics Courses and Research: An Essay Review by Robert F. Potter. [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 12 (1):51 – 57.score: 118.0
    (1997). Considering moral sensitivity in media ethics courses and research: An essay review by Robert F. Potter. Journal of Mass Media Ethics: Vol. 12, No. 1, pp. 51-57. doi: 10.1207/s15327728jmme1201_4.
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  20. Charles Muller, Cultivating Original Enlightenment: Wonhyo's Exposition of the Vajrasamadhi-Sutra, by Robert E. Buswell, Jr.score: 112.0
    This is a review of the book Cultivating Original Enlightenment: Wŏnhyo's Exposition of the Vajrasamādhi-Sūtra , by Robert E. Buswell, Jr., published by the Univeristy of Hawaii Press (2008). This volume, the first to be published in the Collected Works of Wŏnhyo series, contains the translation of a single text by Wŏnhyo, the Kŭmgang Sammaegyŏng Non.
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  21. Richard L. Moreland & Sascha Topolinski (2010). The Mere Exposure Phenomenon: A Lingering Melody by Robert Zajonc. Emotion Review 2 (4):329-339.score: 108.0
    The mere exposure phenomenon (repeated exposure to a stimulus is sufficient to improve attitudes toward that stimulus) is one of the most inspiring phenomena associated with Robert Zajonc’s long and productive career in social psychology. In the first part of this article, Richard Moreland (who was trained by Zajonc in graduate school) describes his own work on exposure and learning, and on the relationships among familiarity, similarity, and attraction in person perception. In the second part, Sascha Topolinski (a recent (...)
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  22. Michael L. Raposa (2014). Realism in Religion: A Pragmatist's Perspective by Robert Cummings Neville (Review). The Pluralist 9 (1):104-108.score: 108.0
    Robert Neville is the author of more than twenty books, and he is presently completing a three-volume systematic philosophical theology, a work that promises to be the crown jewel in a lifetime of extraordinary scholarly accomplishment. Considered within the framework supplied by this remarkable oeuvre, the material published in Realism in Religion takes on a special significance. The essays collected here, although in most cases modified for inclusion, first appeared in various other contexts over a period of time spanning (...)
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  23. Aaron Smuts (2007). Review: Hitchcock as Philosopher by Yanal, Robert J. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65 (3):339–341.score: 96.0
    In Hitchcock as Philosopher, Robert Yanal argues that not only can we find illustrations of philosophical ideas in Hitchcock's films, but that Hitchcock does philosophy through his movies. This is a bold claim. It would be ambitious to merely assert that there are elements in Hitchcock's movies that can support rich philosophical interpretations. This sets the bar high and forces the interpreter to prove the point by supplying productive readings of the films. But Yanal accepts an even more ambitious (...)
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  24. Richard Brown (2007). Review of 'Zombies and Consciousness' by Robert Kirk. [REVIEW] Philosophical Psychology 20 (3):12-15.score: 90.0
    This book covers a vast amount of material in the philosophy of mind, which makes it difficult to do justice to its tightly argued and nuanced details. It does, however, have two overarching goals that are visible, so to speak, from space. In the first half of the book Kirk aims to show that, contra his former self, philosophical zombies are not conceivable. By this he means that the zombie scenario as usually constructed contains an unnoticed contradiction, and explaining the (...)
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  25. Colin Klein, Critical Notice: Cognitive Systems and the Extended Mind by Robert Rupert.score: 90.0
    Robert Rupert is well-known as an vigorous opponent of the hypothesis of extended cognition (HEC). His Cognitive Systems and the Extended Mind is a first-rate development of his “systems-based” approach to demarcating the mind. The results are impressive. Rupert’s account brings much-needed clarity to the often-frustrating debate over HEC: much more than just an attack on HEC, he gives a compelling picture of why the debate matters.
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  26. Robert J. Deltete (2010). The Evolution of God. By Robert Wright. Zygon 45 (2):530-531.score: 90.0
  27. Robert E. Carter (1970). The Structure of Value: Foundations of Scientific Axiology. By Robert S. Hartman. Carbondale, Southern Illinois University Press, 1967. Pp. Vii, 384. $10.00; Second Edition, Paperback, 1969, $2.85. [REVIEW] Dialogue 8 (04):727-730.score: 90.0
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  28. Robert Browning (1959). Karl Strecker: Introduction to Medieval Latin. English Translation and Revision by Robert B. Palmer. Pp. 159. Berlin: Weidmann, 1957. Paper, $3.50. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 9 (02):176-177.score: 90.0
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  29. Thomas M. Alexander (2014). Susanne Langer in Focus: The Symbolic Mind by Robert E. Innis (Review). The Pluralist 9 (1):108-114.score: 90.0
    Robert Innis has performed an immensely valuable service for scholars in the fields of American philosophy, aesthetics, and semiotics. Not only does his comprehensive view of Susanne K. Langer’s opus show us its development, but this is the only book in English devoted solely to Langer. I hope it may help retrieve her considerable philosophical achievement from the penumbral, fading status it has today. Not only does Innis give us a close discussion of Langer’s philosophy, but he also presents (...)
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  30. John Albin Broyer (1982). Essays on the Philosophy of W. V. Quine. Edited and with an Introduction by Robert W. Shahan and Chris Swoyer. [REVIEW] The Modern Schoolman 60 (1):51-52.score: 90.0
    Here are ten essays written by a happily balanced mixture of younger and of more senior Quine scholars commenting on the philosophy of Willard Van Orman Quine, and collected in honor of his seventieth birthday, June 1978.
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  31. Walter Gulick (2013). Realism in Religion: A Pragmatist's Perspective by Robert Cummings Neville (Review). American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 34 (1):70-74.score: 90.0
    Although the title Realism in Religion suggests that this collection of essays might be narrowly focused, this work is an ideal entry to Robert Neville's wide-ranging thought as a whole. All but two of the essays were written as lectures, and consequently, Neville states, "the necessity of writing so as to be understood on first reading makes this book more accessible than my more numbingly nuanced monographs" (xiii). Most of the essays date from the past decade, although two were (...)
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  32. Jerome Lowenstein (2011). Reflections on Medicine: Essays by Robert U. Massey, M.D. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 54 (4):595-598.score: 90.0
    Reflections on Medicine is a rich sampling of 70 essays from a collection of more than 300 essays Robert Massey wrote for Connecticut Medicine: The Journal of the Connecticut State Medical Society, between 1973 and 2005. It is an elegant buffet of the thoughts and observations of a remarkable man. In his foreword to the book, Sherwin Nuland writes: "he applied his massive erudition to so many [other] themes, universal and specific—he accepted the uncertainty of human wisdom and even (...)
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  33. Carl Schmitt (1987). Interrogation of Carl Schmitt by Robert Kempner (I). Telos 1987 (72):97-129.score: 90.0
    Kempner. You do not have to testify, Professor Schmitt, if you do not want to, and if you think you are incriminating yourself. But if you do testify, then I would be grateful if you would be absolutely truthful, would neither conceal nor add anything. Is that your wish? Schmitt: Yes, of course. Kempner: And if I come to something you might find self-incriminating, you can simply say you prefer to remain silent. Schmitt: I have already been interrogated by the (...)
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  34. Robert B. Talisse (2013). Democratic Authority and the Separation of Church and State, by Robert Audi. Mind 122 (487):fzt083.score: 90.0
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  35. Robert Gould (2012). "Nonviolence in Theory and Practice," 3rd Edition, Edited by Robert L. Holmes and Barry L. Gan. Teaching Philosophy 35 (3):316-318.score: 90.0
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  36. M. Nicolson (2010). Death and Doctor Hornbook by Robert Burns: A View From Medical History. Medical Humanities 36 (1):23-26.score: 90.0
    Robert Burns's poem, Death and Doctor Hornbook, 1785, tells of the drunken narrator's late night encounter with Death. The Grim Reaper is annoyed that ‘Dr Hornbook’, a local schoolteacher who has taken to selling medications and giving medical advice, is successfully thwarting his efforts to gather victims. The poet fears that the local gravedigger will be unemployed but Death reassures him that this will not be the case since Hornbook kills more than he cures. Previous commentators have regarded the (...)
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  37. Robert A. Preston (1967). "Theories of Knowledge: A Critical Introduction," by Robert Ackermann. The Modern Schoolman 44 (2):197-198.score: 90.0
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  38. Robert H. Stoothoff (1965). Frontiers of Science and Philosophy. Edited by Robert G. Colodny. (London: George Allen and Unwin Ltd., 1964. Pp. 288. Price 28s. [REVIEW] Philosophy 40 (153):261-.score: 90.0
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  39. Robert Kempner (1987). Interrogation of Carl Schmitt by Robert Kempner (I) and (II). Telos 72:97-107.score: 90.0
     
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  40. Robert Lane (2000). Voodoo Science: The Road From Foolishness to Fraud, by Robert Park. [REVIEW] Knowledge Technology and Policy 13 (2):117-120.score: 90.0
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  41. Ipotesi Modalita (2006). Publications by Robert Stalnaker. In Judith Jarvis Thomson & Alex Byrne (eds.), Content and Modality: Themes From the Philosophy of Robert Stalnaker. Oxford University Press. 296.score: 90.0
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  42. Daniel Morris (2013). American Pragmatism and Democratic Faith by Robert J. Lacey (Review). American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 34 (3):292-295.score: 90.0
    Robert J. Lacey has reservations about both the philosophical roots and the institutional legacy of American participatory democracy. In his combination of political philosophy and intellectual history, Lacey explores several ideas that he takes to be central to participatory democracy in America. Although students of pragmatism may be unsatisfied with some of Lacey’s evaluative conclusions, this book looks at a well-worn topic with new eyes, and offers a fresh interpretation of democratic thought in America. The central event around which (...)
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  43. Robert C. Neville (1991). On the Buddha's Answer to the Silence of God A Review of'The Silence of God: The Answer of the Buddha, By Raimundo Panikkar. Translated From the Italian by Robert R. Barr. [REVIEW] Philosophy East and West 41 (4):557-570.score: 90.0
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  44. John W. Tigue Robert A. Segal (1997). Chaos and Complexity: Scientific Perspectives on Divine Action, Edited by Robert John Russell, Nancey Murphy, and Arthur R. Peacocke JOHN R. ALBRIGHT 433 The Transformation of Consciousness in Myth. Zygon 32 (3):298.score: 90.0
     
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  45. John H. Taylor (2013). In Defence of Powerful Qualities. Metaphysica 14 (1):93-107.score: 87.0
    The ontology of ‘powerful qualities’ is gaining an increasing amount of attention in the literature on properties. This is the view that the so-called categorical or qualitative properties are identical with ‘dispositional’ properties. The position is associated with C.B. Martin, John Heil, Galen Strawson and Jonathan Jacobs. Robert Schroer ( 2012 ) has recently mounted a number of criticisms against the powerful qualities view as conceived by these main adherents, and has also advanced his own (radically different) version (...)
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  46. John Michael Roberts (2007). Review of "Critique Today". Edited by Robert Sinnerbrink, Jean-Philippe Deranty, Nicholas H. Smith and Peter Schmiedgen. Leiden, The Netherlands and Boston: Brill, 2006. [REVIEW] Journal of Critical Realism 6 (2):286-290.score: 86.0
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  47. D. F. Roberts (1993). Growth, Maturation and Physical Activity. Edited by Robert M. Malina & Claude Bouchard. Pp. 501. (Human Kinetics Books, Champaign, Illinois, 1991.) £34.00Worldwide Variation in Human Growth (2nd Edn). Edited by Phyllis B. Eveleth & James M. Tanner. Pp. 397. (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1990.). [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 25 (2):281-283.score: 86.0
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  48. David Yates (2012). The World in the Head by Robert Cummins. (OUP 2010). [REVIEW] Analysis 72 (1):193-196.score: 84.0
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  49. Michael Huemer (2008). Intellectual Virtues: An Essay in Regulative Epistemology - by Robert C. Roberts and W. Jay Wood. Philosophical Books 49 (4):388-390.score: 84.0
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  50. Peter Goldie (2007). Not Passion's Slave: Emotions and Choice, by Robert C. Solomon and From Passions to Emotions: The Creation of a Secular Psychological Category, by Thomas Dixon. European Journal of Philosophy 15 (1):106–110.score: 84.0
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