Search results for 'By Rowan Cruft' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Rowan Cruft (2004). Rights: Beyond Interest Theory and Will Theory? [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 23 (4):347 - 397.score: 450.0
    It is common for philosophers and legal theorists to bemoan the proliferation of the language of rights in popular discourse.1 In a wide range of contemporary public political and ethical debates, disputants are quick to appeal to the existence of rights that support their position – the ‘human rights’ of innocent victims of war, animals’ noninterference rights, individuals’ and businesses’ rights to economic freedom. It is often maintained, with some plausibility, that these public disputes involve hasty and undefended reliance on (...)
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  2. Rowan Cruft, Matthew H. Kramer & Mark R. Reiff (eds.) (2011). Crime, Punishment, and Responsibility: The Jurisprudence of Antony Duff. Oxford University Press.score: 450.0
    This volume collects essays by leading criminal law theorists to explore the principal themes in his work.
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  3. Rowan Cruft, Are Property Rights Ever Basic Human Rights?score: 450.0
    Stealing from someone is not as bad as torturing, killing or raping them. But is the difference between theft and these fundamental violations simply a difference in degree (of severity)? I begin this article by outlining several ways in which the moral grounds for property rights differ in kind from those for basic human rights, differences that underpin and explain the difference in severity. I go on to ask whether, despite these differences, there might be some property rights that we (...)
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  4. Rowan Cruft (2010). Two Approaches to Human Rights. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 60 (238):176-182.score: 240.0
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  5. Rowan Cruft (2006). Against Individualistic Justifications of Property Rights. Utilitas 18 (2):154-172.score: 240.0
    In this article I argue that, despite the views of such theorists as Locke, Hart and Raz, most of a person's property rights cannot be individualistically justified. Instead most property rights, if justified at all, must be justified on non-individualistic (e.g. consequentialist) grounds. This, I suggest, implies that most property rights cannot be morally fundamental ‘human rights’.
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  6. Rowan Cruft (2010). On the Non-Instrumental Value of Basic Rights. Journal of Moral Philosophy 7 (4):441-461.score: 240.0
    Basic rights are often of great instrumental value in securing protection for important human needs and interests. The first two sections of this paper defend the thesis that basic rights are also valuable independently of their instrumental role. Taking my cue from Frances Kamm's suggestion that basic rights reflect or express human worth, in the third, fourth and fifth sections I develop the proposal that the non-instrumental value of basic rights derives from their constitutive role in a universal form of (...)
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  7. Rowan Cruft (2005). Human Rights and Positive Duties. Ethics and International Affairs 19 (1):29–37.score: 240.0
  8. Rowan Cruft (2005). Human Rights, Individualism and Cultural Diversity. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 8 (3):265-287.score: 240.0
    Abstract Two features of human?rights discourse are often targeted for criticism: its universalism and its individualism. Both features, it is usually claimed, illegitimately overlook the significance of cultural diversity. In this essay I argue that individualism is incompatible with universalism and compatible with cultural diversity. Thus I defend the view that human rights are individualistically justified, and I argue that it follows from this that human rights are in an important sense non?universal. I go on to show how my non?universalist (...)
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  9. Rowan Cruft (2005). Against Equality of Opportunity. Philosophical Books 46 (1):59-65.score: 240.0
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  10. Rowan Cruft (2010). Kamm and Miller on Rights' Compatibility. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (4):393 - 401.score: 240.0
    In their recent books, National Responsibility and Global Justice (2007) and Intricate Ethics (2007), David Miller and Frances Kamm give two similar arguments aimed at preventing their favoured accounts of the moral justification of rights from justifying an excess of demanding assistance rights. Both arguments appeal to the fact that a proliferation of assistance rights would conflict with other rights. In this paper, I show that these arguments fail. As Miller recognises in a footnote, the failure of such arguments appears (...)
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  11. Rowan Cruft (2006). Why Aren't Duties Rights? Philosophical Quarterly 56 (223):175-192.score: 240.0
    I do not answer my title’s question in this paper. Instead, my aims are first to show that the question is worth asking, secondly to show that its answer will not be trivial, and thirdly to show that it is unclear what the answer is. From these three conclusions it follows that many contemporary Hohfeldian approaches to the conceptual analysis of rights (including those of Sumner, Jones, Kramer, Wenar and myself)1, while potentially capable of extensional accuracy, overlook an essential but (...)
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  12. Rowan Cruft, Human Rights as Rights.score: 240.0
    This essay makes three suggestions: first, that it is attractive to conceive individualistic justification as one of the hallmarks - maybe even the one hallmark - of human rights; secondly, that combining this conception of human rights with standard worries about socioeconomic rights can tempt one to take the phrase "human rights" to refer to any individualistically justified weighty normative consideration (including considerations that are not rights); and thirdly, that reflections on the individuation of rights and rights' dynamic quality give (...)
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  13. Rowan Cruft (2008). Liberalism and the Changing Character of the Criminal Law: Response to Ashworth and Zedner. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 2 (1):59-65.score: 240.0
  14. Rowan Cruft & Maksymilian Del Mar (2013). Introduction (Symposium on the Human Right to Subsistence). Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (1):53-56.score: 240.0
  15. Rowan Cruft (2013). Why is It Disrespectful to Violate Rights? Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 113 (2pt2):201-224.score: 240.0
    Violating a person's rights is disrespectful to that person. This is because it is disrespectful to someone to violate duties owed to that person. I call these ‘directed duties’; they are the flipside of rights. The aim of this paper is to consider why directed duties and respect are linked, and to highlight a puzzle about this linkage, a puzzle arising from the fact that many directed duties are justified independently of whether they do anything for those to whom they (...)
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  16. Rowan Cruft & Maksymilian Del Mar (2013). Introduction (Symposium on the Human Right to Subsistence). Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (1):53-56.score: 240.0
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  17. Rowan Cruft, Matthew Liao & Massimo Renzo (eds.) (forthcoming). The Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights. Oxford University Press.score: 240.0
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  18. Mark R. Reiff & Rowan Cruft (2011). Antony Duff and the Philosophy of Punishment. In Rowan Cruft, Matthew H. Kramer & Mark R. Reiff (eds.), Crime, Punishment, and Responsibility: The Jurisprudence of Antony Duff. Oup Oxford.score: 240.0
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  19. R. J. Rowan (1977). Discretion to Disobey: A Study of Lawful Departures From Legal Rules. By Mortimer R. Kadish & Sanford H. Kadish. Stanford University Press, Stanford, California. 1973. Pp. X, 241. $8.95. [REVIEW] Dialogue 16 (03):534-538.score: 240.0
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  20. John R. Rowan (1998). Michael P. Zuckert, The Natural Rights Republic Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 18 (5):387-388.score: 240.0
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  21. David DeGrazia & Andrew Rowan (1991). Pain, Suffering, and Anxiety in Animals and Humans. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 12 (3).score: 120.0
    We attempt to bring the concepts of pain, suffering, and anxiety into sufficient focus to make them serviceable for empirical investigation. The common-sense view that many animals experience these phenomena is supported by empirical and philosophical arguments. We conclude, first, that pain, suffering, and anxiety are different conceptually and as phenomena, and should not be conflated. Second, suffering can be the result — or perhaps take the form — of a variety of states including pain, anxiety, fear, and boredom. Third, (...)
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  22. Andrew Nicholas Rowan (2006). Animal Cruelty: Definitions and Sociology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):238-239.score: 120.0
    The definition of cruelty used by the author is broad and ambiguous and does not distinguish between acts of sadism, abuse, and neglect that all lead to the suffering of other beings. Some of the research involving animal cruelty is reviewed with the aim of raising questions about the relevance of the pain–blood–death (PBD) complex described by Nell.
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  23. Michael Rowan (1993). Stove on the Rationality of Induction and the Uniformity Thesis. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 44 (3):561-566.score: 120.0
    Stove attempts to undermine Hume's argument on induction by denying Hume the claim that induction presupposes the uniformity of nature. I argue that Stove's attack on Hume's argument fails. *A paper from which the present piece was derived was read at the Hume Symposium. Flinders Medical Centre, South Australia, in July 1990, where George Couvalis and David Gauthier made helpful criticisms of my argument.
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  24. John R. Rowan (2000). Privacy, Safety, and Human Dignity. Social Philosophy Today 16:171-181.score: 120.0
    This paper is an analysis of the reasoning behind Megan’s Laws, which pertain to the notification of communities when convicted sex offenders move into the area, especially those offenders who have carried out crimes against children. Liberals tend to criticize these laws and often point to the value of privacy, which they claim would be unacceptably compromised by allowing them. Communitarians tend to endorse these laws and often point to the value of safety, which they claim would be unacceptably compromised (...)
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  25. By Rowan Cruft (2006). Why Aren't Duties Rights? Philosophical Quarterly 56 (223):175–192.score: 87.0
    I do not answer my title’s question in this paper. Instead, my aims are first to show that the question is worth asking, secondly to show that its answer will not be trivial, and thirdly to show that it is unclear what the answer is. From these three conclusions it follows that many contemporary Hohfeldian approaches to the conceptual analysis of rights (including those of Sumner, Jones, Kramer, Wenar and myself)1, while potentially capable of extensional accuracy, overlook an essential but (...)
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  26. B. Quash (2001). Book Reviews : Lost Icons: Reflections on Cultural Bereavement, by Rowan Williams. Edinburgh: T&T Clark, 2000.190 Pp. Pb. 12.95. ISBN 0-567-08722-. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 14 (1):117-120.score: 84.0
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  27. William Blissett (2006). Grace and Necessity: Reflections on Art and Love, by Rowan Williams. The Chesterton Review 32 (3/4):443-449.score: 84.0
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  28. Cyril O'Regan (2010). Wrestling with Angels: Conversations in Modern Theology – By Rowan Williams. Modern Theology 26 (1):149-152.score: 84.0
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  29. John Perry (2014). Faith in the Public Square by Rowan Williams (London: Bloomsbury, 2012), Vi + 344 Pp. [REVIEW] Modern Theology 30 (1):181-183.score: 84.0
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  30. Ritamary Bradley (1990). Oliver Davies, God Within: The Mystical Tradition of Northern Europe. Foreword by Rowan Williams. New York and Mahwah, NJ: Paulist Press, 1988. Paper. Pp. Xii, 224. $9.95. [REVIEW] Speculum 65 (3):648-650.score: 84.0
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  31. Gaëlle Fiasse (2000). Thomas Aquinas, Commentary on Aristotle's «Nicomachean Ethics». Translated by CI Litzinger, Op Foreword by Ralph McInerny** _Thomas Aquinas, Commentary on Aristotle's «De Anima». Translated by Kenelm Foster, Op, and Silvester Humphries, Op Introduction by Ralph McInerny_** Thomas Aquinas, Commentary on Aristotle's «Metaphysics». Translation and Introduction by John P. Rowan. Preface by Ralph McInerny. [REVIEW] Revue Philosophique de Louvain 98 (3):610-612.score: 72.0
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  32. A. Hamilton (1997). Life in the Middle Ages From the Seventh to the Thirteenth Century (Hans-Werner Goetz; Edited by Steven Rowan). Heythrop Journal 38:337-337.score: 72.0
     
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  33. Wayne Hankey (1997). Re-Christianizing Augustine Postmodern Style: Readings by Jacques Derrida, Robert Dodaro, Jean-Luc Marion, Rowan Williams, Lewis Ayres and John Milbank. Animus 2:387-415.score: 72.0
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  34. Re-Christianizing Augustine Postmodern Style (1997). Readings by Jacques Derrida, Robert Dodaro, Jean-Luc Marion, Rowan Williams, Lewis Ayres and John Milbank,". Animus 2.score: 72.0
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  35. Medi Ann Volpe (2013). Christ the Stranger: The Theology of Rowan Williams by Benjamin Myers (London: T&T Clark, 2012), X + 130 Pp. [REVIEW] Modern Theology 29 (3):398-400.score: 72.0
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  36. Catherine Rowett (2013). Christopher Stead. Studia Patristica 53 (1):17-30.score: 36.0
    Professor Christopher Stead was Ely Professor of Divinity from 1971 until his retirement in 1980 and one of the great contributors to the Oxford Patristic Conferences for many years. In this paper I reflect on his work in Patristics, and I attempt to understand how his interests diverged from the other major contributors in the same period, and how they were formed by his philosophical milieu and the spirit of the age. As a case study to illustrate and diagnose his (...)
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  37. Rowan Moore (2012). Why We Build. Picador.score: 30.0
    In Why We Build Rowan Moore shows how buildings are driven by human emotions and desires – such as hope, power, money, sex, and the idea of home – and how buildings then shape our experiences.
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  38. Stephen Mulhall (2011). Theology and Narrative: The Self, the Novel, the Bible. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 69 (1):29-43.score: 24.0
    This paper critically evaluates the work of Charles Taylor and Alasdair MacIntyre by comparing their understanding of the narrative structure of selfhood with paradigms derived from three other sources: Heidegger’s conception of human being as Dasein; Rowan Williams’ interpretation of Dostoevsky’s theology of narrative; and Kierkegaard’s project of reading the Old Testament narrative of Abraham and Isaac as part of the Christian God’s autobiography. These comparisons suggest that Taylor and MacIntyre’s own narratives of Western culture lack a certain, theologically (...)
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  39. William Mark Goodwin (2009). Visual Representations in Science. Philosophy of Science 76 (3):372-390.score: 24.0
    This paper evaluates a general argument for the conclusion that visual representations in science must play the role of truth bearers if they are to figure as legitimate contributors to scientific arguments and explanations. The argument is found to be unsound. An alternative approach to assessing the role of visual representations in science is exemplified by an examination of the role of structural formulas in organic chemistry. Structural formulas are found not to play the role of truth bearers; nonetheless, they (...)
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  40. Janet Folina (2012). Newton and Hamilton: In Defense of Truth in Algebra. Southern Journal of Philosophy 50 (3):504-527.score: 24.0
    Although it is clear that Sir William Rowan Hamilton supported a Kantian account of algebra, I argue that there is an important sense in which Hamilton's philosophy of mathematics can be situated in the Newtonian tradition. Drawing from both Niccolo Guicciardini's (2009) and Stephen Gaukroger's (2010) readings of the Newton–Leibniz controversy over the calculus, I aim to show that the very epistemic ideals that underpin Newton's argument for the superiority of geometry over algebra also motivate Hamilton's philosophy of algebra. (...)
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  41. Stanley Hauerwas (2007). The State of the University: Academic Knowledges and the Knowledge of God. Blackwell Pub..score: 24.0
    In this book, controversial and world-renowned theologian, Stanley Hauerwas, tackles the issue of theology being sidelined as a necessary discipline in the modern university. It is an attempt to reclaim the knowledge of God as just that – knowledge. Questions why theology is no longer considered a necessary subject in the modern university, and explores the role it should play in the development of our “knowledge” Considers how theology is often excluded from the knowledges of the modern university because these (...)
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  42. William Franke (2013). Apophasis as the Common Root of Radically Secular and Radically Orthodox Theologies. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 73 (1):57-76.score: 24.0
    On the one hand, we find secularized approaches to theology stemming from the Death of God movement of the 1960s, particularly as pursued by North American religious thinkers such as Thomas J.J. Altizer, Mark C. Taylor, Charles Winquist, Carl Raschke, Robert Scharlemann, and others, who stress that the possibilities for theological discourse are fundamentally altered by the new conditions of our contemporary world. Our world today, in their view, is constituted wholly on a plane of immanence, to such an extent (...)
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  43. M. Cooke (2010). Privatization or Pluralization?: Reflections on Multiple Jurisdictions. Philosophy and Social Criticism 36 (3-4):425-440.score: 24.0
    In a widely publicized lecture in 2008, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams, expressed his concern that the conception of law and democratic citizenship prevailing in England may lead to ghettoization. The problem, in his view, is that the bulk of the convictions and commitments that define a given citizen’s identity are seen as a matter of individual choice and relegated to the private realm. In diagnosing this problem, Williams tacitly distances himself from a privatizing view of democratic politics. (...)
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  44. Ian A. Nell (2013). Service Delivery in Belhar? Leadership Challenges Between the Real and the Ideal. Hts Theological Studies 69 (2):01-09.score: 24.0
    In the discipline of practical theology, one finds a long history of linking the name of the field to diaconiology, in which you find the Greek word diaconia, directly translated as 'service'. For good and scientific reasons, the field changed its name to practical theology in some Faculties of Theology but that does not take away the fact that this field of research is still very much engaged in the broad area of 'service of all kinds'. The purpose of this (...)
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  45. Russell Sandberg, Gillian Douglas, Norman Doe, Sophie Gilliat-Ray & Asma Khan (2013). Britain's Religious Tribunals: 'Joint Governance' in Practice. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 33 (2):263-291.score: 24.0
    In recent years, there have been a number of moral panics in Western societies about the existence of religious courts and tribunals in general and Shariah law in particular. In England and Wales, these concerns came to the fore following the 2008 lecture by the then Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams, on ‘Civil Law and Religious Law in England’. In that lecture, Williams drew upon the work of the Canadian scholar Ayelet Shachar endorsing her concept of ‘transformative accommodation’. (...)
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  46. Peter Schaar (2010). Privacy by Design. Identity in the Information Society 3 (2):267-274.score: 18.0
    In view of rapid and dramatic technological change, it is important to take the special requirements of privacy protection into account early on, because new technological systems often contain hidden dangers which are very difficult to overcome after the basic design has been worked out. So it makes all the more sense to identify and examine possible data protection problems when designing new technology and to incorporate privacy protection into the overall design, instead of having to come up with laborious (...)
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  47. Pierrick Bourrat (2014). From Survivors to Replicators: Evolution by Natural Selection Revisited. Biology and Philosophy 29 (4):517-538.score: 18.0
    For evolution by natural selection to occur it is classically admitted that the three ingredients of variation, difference in fitness and heredity are necessary and sufficient. In this paper, I show using simple individual-based models, that evolution by natural selection can occur in populations of entities in which neither heredity nor reproduction are present. Furthermore, I demonstrate by complexifying these models that both reproduction and heredity are predictable Darwinian products (i.e. complex adaptations) of populations initially lacking these two properties but (...)
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  48. Ann Cavoukian, Scott Taylor & Martin E. Abrams (2010). Privacy by Design: Essential for Organizational Accountability and Strong Business Practices. [REVIEW] Identity in the Information Society 3 (2):405-413.score: 18.0
    An accountability-based privacy governance model is one where organizations are charged with societal objectives, such as using personal information in a manner that maintains individual autonomy and which protects individuals from social, financial and physical harms, while leaving the actual mechanisms for achieving those objectives to the organization. This paper discusses the essential elements of accountability identified by the Galway Accountability Project, with scholarship from the Centre for Information Policy Leadership at Hunton & Williams LLP. Conceptual Privacy by Design principles (...)
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  49. Derek Alan Woodard-Lehman (2008). Body Politics and the Politics of Bodies: Racism and Hauerwasian Theopolitics. Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (2):295-320.score: 18.0
    Today dominative power operates apart from, and exterior to, those state governmentalities that the "body politics" of Stanley Hauerwas disavows as "constantinian" entanglements such as military service, governmental office, and conspicuous expressions of civil religion. This is especially true with respect to those biopolitical modalities David Theo Goldberg names as "racelessness," by which material inequalities are racially correlated, thereby allowing whiteness to mediate life and ration death. If, as Hauerwas contends, radical ecclesiology is indeed a theopolitical alternative to the nation–state's (...)
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  50. Petr Cintula & Carles Noguera (2013). The Proof by Cases Property and its Variants in Structural Consequence Relations. Studia Logica 101 (4):713-747.score: 18.0
    This paper is a contribution to the study of the rôle of disjunction inAlgebraic Logic. Several kinds of (generalized) disjunctions, usually defined using a suitable variant of the proof by cases property, were introduced and extensively studied in the literature mainly in the context of finitary logics. The goals of this paper are to extend these results to all logics, to systematize the multitude of notions of disjunction (both those already considered in the literature and those introduced in this paper), (...)
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