Search results for 'ByAlan Millar' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. ByAlan Millar (2005). Travis' Sense of Occasion. Philosophical Quarterly 55 (219):337–342.score: 240.0
    Charles Travis promotes a conception of knowledge on which knowledge is unmistakable. I raise some issues about what he means by this. Though sympathetic to his project, I give reasons for doubting that he has shown that all knowledge depends on having proof.
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  2. Alan Millar (2004). Understanding People: Normativity and Rationalizing Explanation. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Alan Millar examines our understanding of why people think and act as they do. His key theme is that normative considerations form an indispensable part of the explanatory framework in terms of which we seek to understand each other. Millar defends a conception according to which normativity is linked to reasons. On this basis he examines the structure of certain normative commitments incurred by having propositional attitudes. Controversially, he argues that ascriptions of beliefs and intentions in and of (...)
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  3. Alan Millar (1991). Reasons and Experience. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Millar argues against the tendency in current philosophical thought to treat sensory experiences as a peculiar species of propositional attitude. While allowing that experiences may in some sense bear propositional content, he presents a view of sensory experiences as a species of psychological state. A key theme in his general approach is that justified belief results from the competent exercise of conceptual capacities, some of which involve an ability to respond appropriately to current experience. In working out this approach (...)
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  4. Boyd Millar (2011). Sensory Phenomenology and Perceptual Content. Philosophical Quarterly 61 (244):558-576.score: 30.0
    The consensus in contemporary philosophy of mind is that how a perceptual experience represents the world to be is built into its sensory phenomenology. I defend an opposing view which I call ‘moderate separatism’, that an experience's sensory phenomenology does not determine how it represents the world to be. I argue for moderate separatism by pointing to two ordinary experiences which instantiate the same sensory phenomenology but differ with regard to their intentional content. Two experiences of an object reflected in (...)
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  5. Boyd Millar (2014). The Phenomenological Problem of Perception. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 88 (3):625-654.score: 30.0
    A perceptual experience of a given object seems to make the object itself present to the perceiver’s mind. Many philosophers have claimed that naïve realism (the view that to perceive is to stand in a primitive relation of acquaintance to the world) provides a better account of this phenomenological directness of perceptual experience than does the content view (the view that to perceive is to represent the world to be a certain way). But the naïve realist account of this phenomenology (...)
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  6. Boyd Millar (2010). Peacocke's Trees. Synthese 174 (3):445-461.score: 30.0
    In Sense and Content , Christopher Peacocke points out that two equally-sized trees at different distances from the perceiver are normally represented to be the same size, despite the fact that in a certain sense the nearer tree looks bigger ; he concludes on the basis of this observation that visual experiences possess irreducibly phenomenal properties. This argument has received the most attention of all of Peacocke’s arguments for separatism—the view that the intentional and phenomenal properties of experiences are independent (...)
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  7. Alan Millar (2008). Perceptual-Recognitional Abilities and Perceptual Knowledge. In Adrian Haddock & Fiona Macpherson (eds.), Disjunctivism: Perception, Action, Knowledge. Oxford University Press. 330--47.score: 30.0
    A conception of recognitional abilities and perceptual-discriminative abilities is deployed to make sense of how perceptual experiences enable us to make cognitive contact with objects and facts. It is argued that accepting the emerging view does not commit us to thinking that perceptual experiences are essentially relational, as they are conceived to be in disjunctivist theories. The discussion explores some implications for the theory of knowledge in general and, in particular, for the issue of how we can shed light on (...)
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  8. Boyd Millar (2013). Colour Constancy and Fregean Representationalism. Philosophical Studies 164 (1):219-231.score: 30.0
    All representationalists maintain that there is a necessary connection between an experience’s phenomenal character and intentional content; but there is a disagreement amongst representationalists regarding the nature of those intentional contents that are necessarily connected to phenomenal character. Russellian representationalists maintain that the relevant contents are composed of objects and/or properties, while Fregean representationalists maintain that the relevant contents are composed of modes of presentation of objects and properties. According to Fregean representationalists such as David Chalmers and Brad Thompson, the (...)
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  9. Alan Millar (2002). The Normativity of Meaning. In Anthony O'Hear (ed.), Logic, Thought, and Language. Cambridge University Press. 57-73.score: 30.0
  10. Boyd Millar (2006). The Conflicted Character of Picture Perception. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (4):471–477.score: 30.0
    It is often assumed that there is a perceptual conflict in looking at a picture since one sees both a two-dimensional surface and a three-dimensional scene simultaneously. In this paper, I argue that it is a mistake to think that looking at pictures requires the visual system to perform the special task of reconciling inconsistent impressions of space, or competing information from different depth cues. To the contrary, I suggest that there are good reasons to think that the perception of (...)
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  11. Alan Millar (2009). What is It That Cognitive Abilities Are Abilities to Do? Acta Analytica 24 (4):223-236.score: 30.0
    This article outlines a conception of perceptual-recognitional abilities. These include abilities to recognize certain things from their appearance to some sensory modality, as being of some kind, or as possessing some property. An assumption of the article is that these abilities are crucial for an adequate understanding of perceptual knowledge. The specific aim here is to contrast those abilities with abilities or competences as conceived in the virtue-theoretic literature, with particular reference to views of Ernest Sosa and John Greco. In (...)
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  12. Alan Millar (2000). The Scope of Perceptual Knowledge. Philosophy 75 (291):73-88.score: 30.0
  13. Alan Millar (2008). Disjunctivism and Skepticism. In John Greco (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Skepticism. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    The paper explains what disjunctivism is and explores its implications for skepticism. Following an account of Paul Snowdon’s conception of a disjunctivist account of perceptual experience the the focus is on how disjunctivism has figured in the epistemological work of John McDowell. A conception of recognitional abilities is deployed to expand on McDowell’s position. Finally, there is consideration of whether McDowell offers a satisfactory response to skepticism, taking account of criticism’s made by Crispin Wright.
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  14. Alan Millar (2011). How Visual Perception Yields Reasons for Belief. Philosophical Issues 21 (1):332-351.score: 30.0
    It is argued that seeing that P is a mode of knowing that P that is to be explained in terms of the exercise of visual-perceptual recognitional abilities. The nature of those abilities is described. The justification for believing that P, when one sees that P, is provided by the fact that one sees that P. Access to this fact is explained in terms of an ability to recognize of seen objects that one is seeing them. Reasons for resistance to (...)
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  15. Alan Millar (2007). What the Disjunctivist is Right About. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (1):176-199.score: 30.0
    There is a traditional conception of sensory experience on which the experiences one has looking at, say, a cat could be had by someone merely hallucinating a cat. Disjunctivists take issue with this conception on the grounds that it does not enable us to understand how perceptual knowledge is possible. In particular, they think, it does not explain how it can be that experiences gained in perception enable us to be in ‘cognitive contact’ with objects and facts. I develop this (...)
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  16. Alan Millar (2012). Scepticism, Perceptual Knowledge, and Doxastic Responsibility. Synthese 189 (2):353-372.score: 30.0
    Arguments for scepticism about perceptual knowledge are often said to have intuitively plausible premises. In this discussion I question this view in relation to an argument from ignorance and argue that the supposed persuasiveness of the argument depends on debatable background assumptions about knowledge or justification. A reasonable response to scepticism has to show there is a plausible epistemological perspective that can make sense of our having perceptual knowledge. I present such a perspective. In order give a more satisfying response (...)
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  17. Adrian Haddock, Alan Millar & Duncan Pritchard (eds.) (2010). Social Epistemology. Oxford University Press, USA.score: 30.0
    The fifteen new essays presented in this volume aim to show the fertility and variety of social epistemology and to set the agenda for future research.
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  18. Karsten Jensen, Ellen-Marie Forsberg, Christian Gamborg, Kate Millar & Peter Sandøe (2011). Facilitating Ethical Reflection Among Scientists Using the Ethical Matrix. Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (3):425-445.score: 30.0
    Several studies have indicated that scientists are likely to have an outlook on both facts and values that are different to that of lay people in important ways. This is one significant reason it is currently believed that in order for scientists to exercise a reliable ethical reflection about their research it is necessary for them to engage in dialogue with other stakeholders. This paper reports on an exercise to encourage a group of scientists to reflect on ethical issues without (...)
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  19. Alan Millar (2011). Why Knowledge Matters. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 85 (1):63-81.score: 30.0
    An explanation is given of why it is in the nature of inquiry into whether or not p that its aim is fully achieved only if one comes to know that p or to know that not-p and, further, comes to know how one knows, either way. In the absence of the latter one is in no position to take the inquiry to be successfully completed or to vouch for the truth of the matter in hand. An upshot is that (...)
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  20. Alan Millar (1994). Possessing Concepts: Christopher Peacocke's a Study of Concepts. [REVIEW] Mind 103 (409):73-82.score: 30.0
  21. A. Millar & A. Haddock, Why the Conditional Probability Solution to the Swamping Problem Fails.score: 30.0
    The Swamping Problem is one of the standard objections to reliabilism. If one assumes, as reliabilism does, that truth is the only non instrumental epistemic value, then the worry is that the additional value of knowledge over true belief cannot be adequately explained, for reliability only has instrumental value relative to the non instrumental value of truth. Goldman and Olsson reply to this objection that reliabilist knowledge raises the objective probability of future true beliefs and is thus more valuable than (...)
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  22. Matthias Kaiser, Kate Millar, Erik Thorstensen & Sandy Tomkins (2007). Developing the Ethical Matrix as a Decision Support Framework: GM Fish as a Case Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 20 (1):65-80.score: 30.0
    The Ethical Matrix was developed to help decision-makers explore the ethical issues raised by agri-food biotechnologies. Over the decade since its inception the Ethical Matrix has been used by a number of organizations and the philosophical basis of the framework has been discussed and analyzed extensively. The role of tools such as the Ethical Matrix in public policy decision-making has received increasing attention. In order to further develop the methodological aspects of the Ethical Matrix method, work was carried out to (...)
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  23. Alan Millar (2009). The Measure of Mind: Propositional Attitudes and Their Attribution • by Robert J. Matthews. Analysis 69 (1):185-187.score: 30.0
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  24. Boyd Millar (2014). The Phenomenological Directness of Perceptual Experience. Philosophical Studies 170 (2):235-253.score: 30.0
    When you have a perceptual experience of a given physical object that object seems to be immediately present to you in a way it never does when you consciously think about or imagine it. Many philosophers have claimed that naïve realism (the view that to perceive is to stand in a primitive relation of acquaintance to the world) can provide a satisfying account of this phenomenological directness of perceptual experience while the content view (the view that to perceive is to (...)
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  25. Adrian Haddock, Alan Millar & Duncan Pritchard (eds.) (2009). Epistemic Value. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    Recent epistemology has reflected a growing interest in issues about the value of knowledge and the values informing epistemic appraisal. Is knowledge more valuable that merely true belief or even justified true belief? Is truth the central value informing epistemic appraisal or do other values enter the picture? Epistemic Value is a collection of previously unpublished articles on such issues by leading philosophers in the field. It will stimulate discussion of the nature of knowledge and of directions that might be (...)
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  26. José Luis Bermúdez & Alan Millar (eds.) (2002). Reason and Nature: Essays in the Theory of Rationality. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    The essays in this volume investigate the norms of reason--the standards which contribute to determining whether beliefs, inferences, and actions are rational. Nine philosophers and two psychologists discuss what kinds of things these norms are, how they can be situated within the natural world, and what role they play in the psychological explanation of belief and action. Current work in the theory of rationality is subject to very diverse influences ranging from experimental and theoretical psychology, through philosophy of logic and (...)
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  27. Carla Cjm Millar, Tarek I. EldomIaty, Chong Ju Choi & Brian Hilton (2005). Corporate Governance and Institutional Transparency in Emerging Markets. Journal of Business Ethics 59 (1-2):163 - 174.score: 30.0
    This paper posits that differences in corporate governance structure partly result from differences in institutional arrangements linked to business systems. We developed a new international triad of business systems: the Anglo-American, the Communitarian and the Emerging system, building on the frameworks of Choi et al. (British Academy of Management (Kynoch Birmingham) 1996, Management International Review 39, 257–279, 1999). A common factor determining the success of a corporate governance structure is the extent to which it is transparent to market forces. Such (...)
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  28. Alan Millar (1994). Possessing Concepts. [REVIEW] Mind 103 (409):73-82.score: 30.0
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  29. Alan Millar (1996). The Idea of Experience. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 96:75-90.score: 30.0
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  30. Alan Millar (1991). Concepts, Experience, and Inference. Mind 100 (399):495-505.score: 30.0
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  31. Alan Millar (2001). Rationality and Higher-Order Intentionality. Philosophy Supplement 49:179-198.score: 30.0
  32. Alan Millar (2008). Reviews Truth, Thought, Reason: Essays on Frege by Tyler Burge Clarendon Press, Oxford, 2005, Pp. 419 + XII. Philosophy 83 (2):275-279.score: 30.0
  33. Alan Millar (1996). Sensibility and Understanding. Inquiry 39 (3 & 4):459 – 478.score: 30.0
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  34. Kate Millar & Sandy Tomkins (2007). Ethical Analysis of the Use of GM Fish: Emerging Issues for Aquaculture Development. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 20 (5):437-453.score: 30.0
    Improvements in production methods over the last two decades have resulted in aquaculture becoming a significant contributor to food production in many countries. Increased efficiency and production levels are off-setting unsustainable capture fishing practices and contributing to food security, particularly in a number of developing countries. The challenge for the rapidly growing aquaculture industry is to develop and apply technologies that ensure sustainable production methods that will reduce environmental damage, increase productivity across the sector, and respect the diverse social and (...)
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  35. Alan Millar (2007). The State of Knowing. Philosophical Issues 17 (1):179–196.score: 30.0
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  36. Alan Millar (1989). Experience and the Justification of Belief. Ratio 2 (2):138-152.score: 30.0
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  37. Carla C. J. M. Millar & Chong Ju Choi (2003). Advertising and Knowledge Intermediaries: Managing the Ethical Challenges of Intangibles. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 48 (3):267-277.score: 30.0
    In today''s business environment, the knowledge-based society, globalisation, and information and communication technologies (ICT) have increased the role of "intangible" values of assets and resources for all industries. As a result there is an increased role for knowledge intermediaries; one of these, advertising, plays an important role in affecting consumer choice and knowledge. Ethical issues which arise for traditional purveyors of intangibility – cultural industries such as art, music, or film, spread to advertising. Building on our perspective of the measurement (...)
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  38. Alan Millar (2014). Reasons for Belief, Perception, and Reflective Knowledge. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 88 (1):1-19.score: 30.0
    A conception of the relation between reasons for belief, justified belief, and knowledge is outlined on which (1) a belief is justified, in the sense of being well-founded, only if there is an adequate (normative) reason to believe it, (2) (normative) reasons to believe something are constituted by truths, and (3) a reason to believe something justifies one in believing it only if it is constituted by a truth or truths that one knows. It is argued that, contrary to initial (...)
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  39. Alan Millar (1986). What's in a Look? Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 86:83-98.score: 30.0
  40. Carla C. J. M. Millar, Chong-Ju Choi & Philip Y. K. Cheng (2009). Co-Evolution: Law and Institutions in International Ethics Research. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 87 (4):455 - 462.score: 30.0
    Despite the importance of the co-evolution approach in various branches of research, such as strategy, organisation theory, complexity, population ecology, technology and innovation (Lewin et al., 1999; March, 1991), co-evolution has been relatively neglected in international business and ethics research (Madhok and Phene, 2001). The purpose of this article is to show how co-evolution theory provides a theoretical framework within which some issues of ethics research are addressed. Our analysis is in the context of the contrasts between business systems (North, (...)
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  41. Alan Millar (2011). Mill on the Cultivation of Feeling. Philosophical Papers 39 (3):457-472.score: 30.0
    Aspects of Mill's moral and political philosophy are explored in the light of key themes from his posthumously published essay 'Utility of Religion'.
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  42. P. Millar (1973). On the Point of the Imitation Game. Mind 82 (October):595-97.score: 30.0
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  43. Alan Millar (2007). Review of Anil Gupta, Empiricism and Experience. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (2).score: 30.0
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  44. Alan Millar (2002). Review: Perception, Knowledge and Belief: Selected Essays. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (442):389-392.score: 30.0
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  45. A. Millar (2010). The Nature of Normativity, by Ralph Wedgwood. Mind 119 (473):262-266.score: 30.0
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  46. Alan Millar (1985). Veridicality: More on Searle. Analysis 45 (March):120-124.score: 30.0
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  47. Carla C. J. M. Millar & Chong Ju Choi (2010). MNCs, Worker Identity and the Human Rights Gap for Local Managers. Journal of Business Ethics 97 (S1):55-60.score: 30.0
    This article analyses MNCs, worker identity and the ethical vulnerability caused by over-reliance on expatriate managers and under-reliance on local managers, who are often undervalued. It is argued that MNCs not only need but also have an obligation to assess local managers’ knowledge and contributions as having not only operational and market values, but also institutional value. Local managers both give access to and form part of local social capital and the treatment they receive is an element in the CSR (...)
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  48. M. Millar (2012). Constraining the Use of Antibiotics: Applying Scanlon's Contractualism. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (8):465-469.score: 30.0
    Decisions to use antibiotics require that patient interests are balanced against the public good, that is, control of antibiotic resistance. Patients carry the risks of suboptimal antibiotic treatment and many physicians are reluctant to impose even small avoidable risks on patients. At the same time, antibiotics are overused and antibiotic-resistant microbes are contributing an increasing burden of adverse patient outcomes. It is the criteria that we can use to reject the use of antibiotics that is the focus of this paper. (...)
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  49. Roderick Millar (1982). A Defence of Direct Surface Realism. Philosophy 57 (July):339-355.score: 30.0
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  50. Alan Millar (1988). Following Nature. Philosophical Quarterly 38 (151):165-185.score: 30.0
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