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Profile: Byron J. Stoyles (Trent University)
  1. Byron J. Stoyles (2014). Teleology, First Principles, and Scientific Method in Aristotle's Biology, by Allan Gotthelf. Mind 123 (491):909-913.
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  2. Byron J. Stoyles (2013). Μέγιστα Γένη and Division in Aristotle's Generation of Animals. Apeiron 46 (1):1-25.
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  3. Byron J. Stoyles & Sorin Costreie (2013). Rethinking Voluntary Euthanasia. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (6):jht045.
    Our goal in this article is to explicate the way, and the extent to which, euthanasia can be voluntary from both the perspective of the patient and the perspective of the health care providers involved in the patient’s care. More significantly, we aim to challenge the way in which those engaged in ongoing philosophical debates regarding the morality of euthanasia draw distinctions between voluntary, involuntary, and nonvoluntary euthanasia on the grounds that drawing the distinctions in the traditional manner (1) fails (...)
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  4. Byron J. Stoyles (2012). Explanation and Teleology in Aristotle's Science of Nature. By Mariska Leunissen. Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):452-458.
  5. Byron J. Stoyles (2012). Philosophical Suicide. Think 11 (30):73-84.
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  6. Byron J. Stoyles (2011). Challenging the Epicureans: Death and Two Kinds of Well-Being. Philosophical Forum 42 (1):1-19.
  7. Byron J. Stoyles (2007). Aristotle, Akrasia, and the Place of Desire in Moral Reasoning. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (2):195 - 207.
    This paper serves both as a discussion of Henry’s (Ethical Theory Moral Practice, 5:255–270, 2002) interpretation of Aristotle on the possibility of akrasia – knowing something is wrong and doing it anyway – and an indication of the importance of desire in Aristotle’s account of moral reasoning. As I will explain, Henry’s interpretation is advantageous for the reason that it makes clear how Aristotle could have made good sense of genuine akrasia, a phenomenon that we seem to observe in the (...)
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  8. Byron J. Stoyles (2003). Internal Rhetorics. Dialogue 42 (4):816-818.
     
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  9. Byron J. Stoyles (2003). Internal Rhetorics: Toward a History and Theory of Self-Persuasion Jean Nienkamp Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press, 2001, Xiv + 170 Pp. [REVIEW] Dialogue 42 (04):816-.
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  10. Byron J. Stoyles (2003). Reasons and the Fear of Death R. E. Ewin Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2002, Vii + 167 Pp., $70.00, $24.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Dialogue 42 (04):821-.
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  11. Byron J. Stoyles (2003). Reasons and the Fear of Death. Dialogue 42 (4):821-823.
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